Press releases

Cyanobacteria: the future of sunscreen?

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Sunscreens and moisturizers derived from biological sources such as cyanobacteria could represent a safer alternative to current, synthetically produced cosmetics, research published in the European Journal of Phycology suggests.

Environmental DNA effectively monitors aquatic species populations

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Environmental DNA (eDNA), the nuclear or mitochondrial DNA shed from an organism into its environment, is a rapidly evolving tool for monitoring the distribution of aquatic species. A new study published in Transactions of the American Fisheries Society discusses the ability of eDNA to accurately predict the presence, relative abundance, and biomass of wild Brook Trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) populations.

Psychoanalysts need a better understanding of human sexuality to help their patients

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“Psychoanalysts were once thought to be experts on sexual issues, but that is less true today. The rift between psychoanalysis and scientific sexology that occurred in the mid-20th century may be partly responsible,” states Mark J. Blechner, PhD, author of “Psychoanalysis and Sexual Issues,” a new article available from Contemporary Psychoanalysis, the official publication of the William Alanson White Institute and the William Alanson White Psychoanalytic Society. 

How to overcome end-point bias in the media to make smarter decisions

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“End-point bias” is a well-known psychological tendency to interpret a recent short-term fluctuation as a reversal of a long-term trend. A study published in Environment Communication has concluded that end-point bias can be overcome by use of the LIVA – Leveraging-Involving-Visualizing-Analogizing – method, which has the potential to improve decisions made by the public and policy makers.

‘Toxic forms of consumer credit’: how payday lenders manipulate consumers

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A new study has revealed how payday lenders use manipulative language and cunning marketing strategies to lure borrowers into exploitative loan agreements. The article, published in Critical Discourse Studies, scrutinizes the techniques employed online by leading payday lender Wonga, which hide the dangerous nature of their loans. Understanding these techniques is essential for financial watchdogs and consumers alike in protecting the vulnerable from predatory lenders.

Confronting the psychological demands on endurance athletes

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What are the psychological demands commonly faced by endurance athletes? New research published in the International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology has identified psychological stressors common to endurance athletes across different sports at different performance levels. The article underscores where researchers can make effective recommendations to athletes of all abilities in helping them cope with pervasive psychological difficulties. The new research is therefore an important set of findings for anyone interested in improving performance in endurance sports.

Was Brexit an act of self-protection?

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The Brexit vote should be understood as ‘a form of social self-protection’ according to leading economist Ann Pettifor. Writing in the journal Globalizations, Pettifor has derided ‘the predatory nature of market fundamentalism’ in which self-regulating markets are left to govern themselves beyond the control of democratic regulations. Voting for Brexit, Pettifor argues, was a rejection of the ‘religion’ of the ‘dominant liberal finance narrative’ by the people that market fundamentalism has left behind.

Can research methods from different disciplines work together?

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A new article exploring how to make research methods from different disciplines work together has been published in Cultural Trends. The article’s recommendations are based on the experience of organizing an enormous multidisciplinary project, Dementia and Imagination. With an emphasis on multidisciplinary research growing in the academy and social policy alike, this new article offers valuable insight to researchers and teams involved in collaborations between different specialisms.

Women strongly under-represented in British broadcast media

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Recent research in Journalism Practice has revealed a steady disparity between the numbers of male and female experts on British flagship TV and radio news. Despite a prevalence of female authority figures in Britain, authors Lis Howell and Jane B. Singer found that women were outnumbered by four to one.

Early marriage and pregnancy risk for adolescent Syrian refugees

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Education and counselling are key to improving the lives of Syrian girls in Jordanian refugee camps, according to a new study. Writing in the journal Pathogens and General Health, three current and former experts at the United Nations Population Fund outline the dire situation in which many young women in the Zaatari Camp find themselves.

Could honey bee brood be the future of food?

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With human population set to reach 9 billion by 2050, eating insects is gaining attention as a possible way to feed the world. A paper published in the Journal of Apicultural Research shows how honey bee brood – the larvae and pupae of drones – has great potential as a food source.

Greater practitioner support needed for teenagers engaging in ‘sexting’

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A new study published in the Journal of Youth Studies highlights a need for practitioners to discuss with teenagers safe ways to engage in so-called 'sexting', the sending of self-made, sexually explicit images sent via mobile phone or computers. The research uncovers a disparity between gendered perceptions of sexting, and what the perceived risks and consequences are.

Suicide prevention: reacting to the tell-tale signs

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Can search engines save lives? Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich researchers are working on an approach which would enable search engines to more effectively identify users who are at risk of suicide and provide them with information on where to find help.

Are family relationships at the root of financial risk-taking?

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What makes some young adults behave in ways that have the potential to harm themselves or those around them? Many studies have examined the complex psychology of financial risk-taking, but new research from Cogent Economics & Finance suggests that financial risk-taking in young adults, including going into debt or breaking the law, could be rooted in their childhood relationships with parents.

Routledge to publish the Journal of Urban Affairs

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Taylor & Francis Group and the Urban Affairs Association (UAA) are pleased to announce a new publishing partnership. Beginning with the 2017 Volume, Taylor & Francis will publish and distribute UAA's highly regarded journal, the Journal of Urban Affairs (JUA), under the Routledge imprint.

Men welcome revolutionary male contraceptive

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A new study has found that men have positive attitudes towards an innovative male contraceptive, Vasalgel. The landmark study, published in Cogent Medicine, is the first insight into how men perceive the new contraceptive.

Male sleep habits may increase risk of cancer

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Men who have worked night shifts for more than twenty years, or who work night shifts without daytime napping, or sleep for more than ten hours per night on average may have an increased risk of cancer, according to a study published in Annals of Medicine.

Celebrating achievements in the humanities, arts and social sciences

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The Council for the Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences (CHASS) has announced the publication of a new book to showcase the significant contribution made by Australian academics to the fields of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences (HASS). Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences: It’s everyone’s business published on behalf of CHASS by Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group, was launched at a celebratory dinner at RMIT University in Melbourne to honour distinguished achievements in Australian research.

The link between corporate social responsibility and success in management

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How vital is it for leaders in modern business to be ‘socially responsible’? Can business ethics influence quality management? Recent open access research from Cogent Business & Management identifies key parallels between quality management and the importance of taking socially responsible steps in business.

New research shows dieting success may be hardwired into the brain

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Obesity and dieting are increasingly common in contemporary society, and many dieters struggle to lose excess weight. A new research paper, by Chen et al in Cognitive Neuroscience, studied the connections between the executive control and reward systems in the brain, and discovered the ability to self-regulate a healthy body weight may be dependent on individual brain structure.

An open letter to the presidential nominees from Change: the magazine of higher learning

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Taylor & Francis Group and the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA) are pleased to announce the publication of an open letter to the presidential nominees from Change: The Magazine of Higher Learning entitledHigher Education, The Road to American Success: An Open Letter to the Presidential Nominees” written by George Pernsteiner and Rebecca Martin.

How sweet it is: artificial sweeteners in blood

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A recent study by investigators at the National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive and Kidney Diseases at the National Institutes of Health measured how much artificial sweetener is absorbed into the blood stream by children and adults after drinking a can of diet soda.

Taylor & Francis partners with ReadCube to enhance discoverability of article and book collections

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Taylor & Francis, one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly content, today announced its partnership with publishing technology company, ReadCube. Through ReadCube’s Discover service, over four million Taylor & Francis journal articles and book chapters are now indexed and discoverable across ReadCube’s platform.  By incorporating popular features from Taylor & Francis Online with those of ReadCube’s reference management tools, scholars will enjoy a more immersive and productive research experience.

How the news media helped nominate Trump

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Donald Trump’s rise to Republican Presidential Nominee has raised important questions regarding the media’s relationship with political institutions and candidates. In “How the News Media Helped to Nominate Trump” Julia R. Azari offers valuable insight into how news media has come to work within, not against, the political institutions that shape nominations. This article is part of The Forum - a new section of Political Communication centered on dynamic scholarly review of books, articles, and ideas of importance to researchers, journalists, students, and the public.

Unprecedented insight into the Iran Deal

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A unique first-hand account of the negotiations leading to the Iran nuclear deal has been published by the former French Prime Minister, Laurent Fabius, in The Washington Quarterly. The article unflinchingly discloses the innermost workings of one of the most important agreements of international diplomacy of the new millennium.

New analysis sheds light on Zika virus evolution and spread

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In a study published in Pathogens and Global Health, researchers have modelled the evolutionary development and diversity of the Zika virus to better understand how infection spreads between populations and how the virus reacts with the immune system. Such an understanding is essential if an effective vaccine is to be developed.

Researchers describe new large prehistoric shark

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Megalolamna paradoxodon is the name of a new extinct shark described by an international research team who based their discovery on fossilized teeth up to 4.5 centimeters (1.8 inches) tall found from the eastern and western United States (California and North Carolina), Peru and Japan. The new study, "A new elusive otodontid shark (Lamniformes: Otodontidae) from the lower Miocene, and comments on the taxonomy of otodontid genera, including the 'megatoothed' clade,” will appear in the forthcoming issue of the international scientific journal, Historical Biology and online on October 3.

#allmalepanels – how to break the cycle of discrimination

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It might seem that equal rights have come a long way, but how far are we from true diversity and equality? New research by Cardiff Univeristy's Marysia Zalewski in the International Feminist Journal of Politics broaches the issue of endemic discrimination by looking at the all too common phenomena of ‘all male panels’.

“See it before it’s gone”: the paradox of ‘last chance tourism’ on the Great Barrier Reef

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Many of the tourists now flocking to see Australia’s Great Barrier Reef (GBR) are hoping to ‘see it before it’s gone’ – in the latest example of what’s come to be known as ‘Last Chance Tourism (LCT)’. Annah Piggott-McKellar and Karen McNamara from the University of Queensland (Australia) explain the concept of ‘LCT’ in the current issue of the Journal of Sustainable Tourism.

Feeding a Mars mission: the challenges of growing plants in space

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Plants will play a critical role in the survival of human beings on long-duration space missions, such as a mission to Mars.  However, as a paper published in Botany Letters shows, many challenges need to be addressed if astronauts are to successfully grow enough food on board spacecraft and on other planets.

Do the writing styles of Hillary’s memoirs mirror her greatest political struggle?

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The memoir has long formed an important part of politicians’ careers, no more so when they are positioning themselves for a run to the highest level of office. A new review of Hillary Clinton’s two political memoirs reveal a common theme of Clinton’s guardedness – which may mirror how she is perceived more generally as a politician in the forthcoming U.S. presidential election. The authors discuss their findings in a new study published in the Quarterly Journal of Speech, a National Communication Association journal.

Do dogs go to heaven?

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The first study to systematically explore beliefs about animal afterlife by asking a national sample of Americans has been published in the journal Anthrozoös. It investigated how demographic categories can have a considerable influence on beliefs about animal afterlife. With around 70% of US households owning pets, the study marks a new insight into a largely unexplored area of American spirituality.

Drinking to belong: Students and low self-esteem

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It’s that time of year again, when students old and new are heading to university. Certain behaviors might be expected in the coming months, drinking in particular. Drinking is widespread among student populations, whether for social enrichment or the need to conform.

Western diet increases Alzheimer’s risk

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Globally, about 42 million people now have dementia, with Alzheimer’s disease as the most common type of dementia. Rates of Alzheimer’s disease are rising worldwide. The most important risk factors seem to be linked to diet, especially the consumption of meat, sweets, and high-fat dairy products that characterize a Western Diet. For example, when Japan made the nutritional transition from the traditional Japanese diet to the Western diet, Alzheimer’s disease rates rose from 1% in 1985 to 7% in 2008, with rates lagging the nutrition transition by 20-25 years. The evidence of these risk factors, which come from ecological and observational studies, also shows that fruits, vegetables, grains, low-fat dairy products, legumes, and fish are associated with reduced risk. “Using Multicountry Ecological and Observational Studies to Determine Dietary Risk Factors for Alzheimer's Disease,” a review article from the Journal of the American College of Nutrition presents the data.

Concussions and brain injury - can omega-3 intake aid in brain health recovery?

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The treatment of concussions and traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a clinical challenge. Clinical studies thus far have failed to identify an effective treatment strategy when a combination of targets controlling aspects of neuroprotection, neuroinflammation, and neuroregeneration is needed.  According to emerging science and clinical experience, aggressive intake of omega-3 fatty acids (n-3FA) seems to be beneficial to TBI, concussion, and post-concussion syndrome patients. This research is presented in "Concussions, Traumatic Brain Injury, and the Innovative Use of Omega-3s", a review article from the Journal of the American College of Nutrition, official publication of the American College of Nutrition.

Education not to blame for increasing childlessness in Europe

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The increasing proportion of the population who prefer to remain childless is a major social problem for many European countries. However this trend has not (so far) been the result of the expansion of education. This is the conclusion of new research, published in the journal Population Studies.

Do the tools to quantify addiction help to define it?

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Understanding what counts as an addiction, and what can be done to address it is the work of researchers across many disciplines. But what tools are used to ‘measure’ addiction, and are these capable of legitimising an addiction or improving our knowledge of it?

Fighting the stigma of albinism

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People with albinism face major health problems, including skin cancer, involuntary eye movements, and poor eyesight. According to a new study in the journal Anthropology & Medicine, many of them also suffer severe discrimination and social stigmatization.

China’s honey bee losses are low compared with West

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Since concern about widespread honey bee colony losses began ten years ago, there have been surveys carried out to assess winter losses in North America and many European countries. So far, the picture in China, the largest beekeeping country in the world, has been unclear. Now for the first time, information about winter losses from a large-scale survey carried out from 2010-13 has been published.

How do we become who we are?

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What might it feel like to be born? What does ‘I love you’ really mean? Why do we repeat the patterns of our parents’ and grandparents’ lives without realising it? The Stages of Life provides the ‘big picture’ of the human lifespan that is often missing in developmental psychology courses. The author explores how our personalities evolve in response to both genetic and social influences, how and why individuals differ, and how some problems tend to develop at particular stages of the life course.

TerraPop: Changing the way we manage geospatial data

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The Journal of Map & Geography Libraries is pleased to announce the winner of the 2016 Best Paper Award: “Terra Populus: Workflows for Integrating and Harmonizing Geospatial Population and Environmental Data,” by Tracy A. Kugler, David C. Van Riper, Steven M. Manson, David A. Haynes II, Joshua Donato, and Katie Stinebaugh.

The censoring of menstruation in adolescent literature: a growing problem

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'The Censoring of Menstruation in Adolescent Literature: A Growing Problem,' an article published in Women’s Reproductive Health, discusses the importance of “shedding the shame and secrecy” of menstruation in adolescent literature. While other “sensitive” topics of the past aren’t being censored in schools today, menstruation still is in many cases.

Do women believe in menstrual synchrony?

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'Demystifying Menstrual Synchrony: Women’s Subjective Beliefs About Bleeding in Tandem With Other Women,' an article recently published in Women’s Reproductive Health, addresses the overlooked issue of why many women believe in menstrual synchrony. While there is a substantial body of scientific work on whether or not menstrual synchrony exists, far less work has examined why women believe in menstrual synchrony and the reasons they attribute to its existence. While there is empirical uncertainty as to the existence of menstrual synchrony, the results from this study reveal that women overwhelmingly endorse its occurrence.

Peep Show: Pretending to be a normal human being

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If you are a fan of British comedy, you will no doubt have come across the institution that is Peep Show. 54 episodes spanning over a decade from 2003 – 2015, following the humorously depressing lives of protagonists Mark Corrigan and Jeremy Usbourne.

Flattering rivals gains politicians more votes

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Focusing on the negative aspects of one’s political opponent has become the norm in election campaigns across the world. But a recent study by Nicoletta Cavazza published in Social Influence shows that it could be in politicians’ interests to pay more attention to positive campaigning.

Who uses public bicycles?

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Public Bicycle Sharing Systems are becoming increasingly common across the world’s cities and towns – but who is making use of them? A new study in Applied Economics Letters finds a difference between those who use public bicycle schemes, and those who prefer to use their own bike.

It’s hard to be a ‘Girl DJ’ - Exploring gender (in)equality behind the scenes of the Music industry

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Electronic clubbing scenes in 70’s New York and Britain’s rave culture in the 80’s have been celebrated as times of emancipation in their fusion of class, culture and gender. In a new article published by Contemporary Music Review, Tami Gadir challenges the idea that total gender equality now prevails. Are gender related prejudices still rife in clubs despite snapshots of social and political consciousness in dance music culture?

Water - the office hero

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The culture of grabbing something quick to eat amid a mounting pile of to-dos at work often leads to making the wrong decisions when searching for something to eat in the workplace. Unplanned cake offerings and the emergence of ‘food altars’ – central places for leftovers from work meetings or unhealthy snacks present workers with a never-ending stream of choice. A recent study in the journal Food, Culture & Society: An International Journal of Multidisciplinary Research reveals water to be the main redeemer of ‘negative nutrition’ in the workplace.

Britain’s wealth lies in its people

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A decade ago a World Bank report asked ‘Where is the Wealth of Nations?’ New calculations published in Scandinavian Economic History Review show that for Britain, the answer is undoubtedly in its people.