Press releases

Learning from Minority Serving Institutions key to tackling critical shortage of teachers of color

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New research published in The Teacher Educator highlights the continuing shortage of black and ethnic minority teachers in US schools (with only half of schools employing a teacher of color), and suggests that learning about, and investing in, innovative approaches happening at Minority Serving Institutions (MSIs) is key to diversifying the teacher workforce and improving minority student achievement.

What is the psychology of job interviews?

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Most people, at some point in their lives, experience the stress of being interviewed for a job they want. Many also face the challenge of interviewing other people. But what does the science tell us about this unique social situation?

Spiritual retreats change feel-good chemical systems in the brain; May prime for spiritual experiences

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PHILADELPHIA (March 23, 2017) — More Americans than ever are turning to spiritual, meditative and religious retreats as a way to reset their daily life and enhance wellbeing. Now, researchers at The Marcus Institute of Integrative Health at Thomas Jefferson University show there are changes in the dopamine and serotonin systems in the brains of retreat participants. The team published their results in Religion, Brain & Behavior.

Economic models behind EU-Canada free trade agreement questioned

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The EU-Canada Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA), recently approved by the European Parliament, will ultimately result in unemployment, inequality and loss of economic efficiency, according to a paper published in the International Journal of Political Economy.

Study sparks debate over relationship between compact development and driving

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Compact development is often recommended as a way to get people to drive less and create more sustainable communities. However, different studies over the years have yielded different outcomes, leading to a muddled understanding about the true impact of compact development. After using meta-aggression analysis, Mark R. Stevens of the University of British Columbia, concludes that planners should not rely on compact development as their only strategy for reducing driving, as it doesn’t have much of an impact.

What’s the best way to raise a secure child?

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Parents (and expectant parents) all want to do the best for their children. They read up on all the latest parenting theories, find the best nurseries and preschools, figure out which foods will promote healthy growth, and vow to avoid making the same "mistakes" other people make—or that their own parents made

Better communication key to cutting earthquake death toll, experts say

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Communicating earthquake risk has long been a major challenge for scientists. Yet the right messages at the right time can and will save lives, say U.S. communication scholars in an article published in the Journal of Applied Communication Research, a National Communication Association publication.

Public may be more accepting of advocacy by climate scientists than previously thought

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Research published today in Environmental Communication suggests that scientists may have more freedom than previously thought to engage in certain forms of climate change advocacy without risking harm to their credibility. The experiment, conducted by researchers at George Mason University’s Center for Climate Change Communication, showed that on five out of six occasions when a fictional scientist made advocacy statements to the public on Facebook, their own and their colleagues credibility was left unharmed.

Organic foods: Neurologically less rewarding

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The study, published in Cogent Psychology, successfully demonstrates for the first time that different parts of the brain are activated when perceiving popular food brands as opposed to organic brands. The new insight marks a breakthrough in the understanding of consumer neuroscience and behaviour, and may ultimately lead to consumers choosing healthier eating options.

Rare fossil discovery raises questions

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Adult and juvenile remains of a giant rodent species (Isostylomys laurdillardi) have been uncovered by researchers, in the Río de la Plata coastal region of southern Uruguay, raising questions about classification within dinomids.

Innovation Management – The State of the Art

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The 60th volume of Research-Technology Management, the award-winning journal of the Industrial Research Institute (IRI), begins 2017 with a themed issue “Innovation Management—The State of the Art”.

How Thailand eliminated mother-to-child HIV transmission

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Thailand has become the first Asian country to eliminate mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV, thanks to a pragmatic multi-sector response backed by strong political commitment and heavy government investment, a study published in Paediatrics and International Child Health reports.

The solution from the skies to save endangered species

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Four hundred years ago Galileo created a revolution by pointing his telescope to the skies. Now an astrophysicist and an ecologist from Liverpool John Moores University (LJMU) are reversing this perspective to help endangered species including rhinos and orang-utans.

Gull decline on Scottish island linked to decline in fishing discards

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The research, published in the British Trust for Ornithology (BTO) journal Bird Study, looked at the breeding populations of three species of large gull; Herring Gull, Great Black-backed Gull and Lesser Black-backed Gull on the Hebridean island of Canna, and the relationship between these gull populations and the fall in the quantity of fish landed in the nearby harbour of Mallaig.

Cyanobacteria: the future of sunscreen?

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Sunscreens and moisturizers derived from biological sources such as cyanobacteria could represent a safer alternative to current, synthetically produced cosmetics, research published in the European Journal of Phycology suggests.

Environmental DNA effectively monitors aquatic species populations

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Environmental DNA (eDNA), the nuclear or mitochondrial DNA shed from an organism into its environment, is a rapidly evolving tool for monitoring the distribution of aquatic species. A new study published in Transactions of the American Fisheries Society discusses the ability of eDNA to accurately predict the presence, relative abundance, and biomass of wild Brook Trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) populations.

Psychoanalysts need a better understanding of human sexuality to help their patients

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“Psychoanalysts were once thought to be experts on sexual issues, but that is less true today. The rift between psychoanalysis and scientific sexology that occurred in the mid-20th century may be partly responsible,” states Mark J. Blechner, PhD, author of “Psychoanalysis and Sexual Issues,” a new article available from Contemporary Psychoanalysis, the official publication of the William Alanson White Institute and the William Alanson White Psychoanalytic Society. 

How to overcome end-point bias in the media to make smarter decisions

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“End-point bias” is a well-known psychological tendency to interpret a recent short-term fluctuation as a reversal of a long-term trend. A study published in Environment Communication has concluded that end-point bias can be overcome by use of the LIVA – Leveraging-Involving-Visualizing-Analogizing – method, which has the potential to improve decisions made by the public and policy makers.

‘Toxic forms of consumer credit’: how payday lenders manipulate consumers

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A new study has revealed how payday lenders use manipulative language and cunning marketing strategies to lure borrowers into exploitative loan agreements. The article, published in Critical Discourse Studies, scrutinizes the techniques employed online by leading payday lender Wonga, which hide the dangerous nature of their loans. Understanding these techniques is essential for financial watchdogs and consumers alike in protecting the vulnerable from predatory lenders.

Confronting the psychological demands on endurance athletes

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What are the psychological demands commonly faced by endurance athletes? New research published in the International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology has identified psychological stressors common to endurance athletes across different sports at different performance levels. The article underscores where researchers can make effective recommendations to athletes of all abilities in helping them cope with pervasive psychological difficulties. The new research is therefore an important set of findings for anyone interested in improving performance in endurance sports.

Was Brexit an act of self-protection?

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The Brexit vote should be understood as ‘a form of social self-protection’ according to leading economist Ann Pettifor. Writing in the journal Globalizations, Pettifor has derided ‘the predatory nature of market fundamentalism’ in which self-regulating markets are left to govern themselves beyond the control of democratic regulations. Voting for Brexit, Pettifor argues, was a rejection of the ‘religion’ of the ‘dominant liberal finance narrative’ by the people that market fundamentalism has left behind.

Can research methods from different disciplines work together?

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A new article exploring how to make research methods from different disciplines work together has been published in Cultural Trends. The article’s recommendations are based on the experience of organizing an enormous multidisciplinary project, Dementia and Imagination. With an emphasis on multidisciplinary research growing in the academy and social policy alike, this new article offers valuable insight to researchers and teams involved in collaborations between different specialisms.

Women strongly under-represented in British broadcast media

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Recent research in Journalism Practice has revealed a steady disparity between the numbers of male and female experts on British flagship TV and radio news. Despite a prevalence of female authority figures in Britain, authors Lis Howell and Jane B. Singer found that women were outnumbered by four to one.

Early marriage and pregnancy risk for adolescent Syrian refugees

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Education and counselling are key to improving the lives of Syrian girls in Jordanian refugee camps, according to a new study. Writing in the journal Pathogens and General Health, three current and former experts at the United Nations Population Fund outline the dire situation in which many young women in the Zaatari Camp find themselves.

Could honey bee brood be the future of food?

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With human population set to reach 9 billion by 2050, eating insects is gaining attention as a possible way to feed the world. A paper published in the Journal of Apicultural Research shows how honey bee brood – the larvae and pupae of drones – has great potential as a food source.

Greater practitioner support needed for teenagers engaging in ‘sexting’

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A new study published in the Journal of Youth Studies highlights a need for practitioners to discuss with teenagers safe ways to engage in so-called 'sexting', the sending of self-made, sexually explicit images sent via mobile phone or computers. The research uncovers a disparity between gendered perceptions of sexting, and what the perceived risks and consequences are.

Suicide prevention: reacting to the tell-tale signs

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Can search engines save lives? Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich researchers are working on an approach which would enable search engines to more effectively identify users who are at risk of suicide and provide them with information on where to find help.

Are family relationships at the root of financial risk-taking?

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What makes some young adults behave in ways that have the potential to harm themselves or those around them? Many studies have examined the complex psychology of financial risk-taking, but new research from Cogent Economics & Finance suggests that financial risk-taking in young adults, including going into debt or breaking the law, could be rooted in their childhood relationships with parents.

Routledge to publish the Journal of Urban Affairs

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Taylor & Francis Group and the Urban Affairs Association (UAA) are pleased to announce a new publishing partnership. Beginning with the 2017 Volume, Taylor & Francis will publish and distribute UAA's highly regarded journal, the Journal of Urban Affairs (JUA), under the Routledge imprint.

Men welcome revolutionary male contraceptive

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A new study has found that men have positive attitudes towards an innovative male contraceptive, Vasalgel. The landmark study, published in Cogent Medicine, is the first insight into how men perceive the new contraceptive.

Male sleep habits may increase risk of cancer

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Men who have worked night shifts for more than twenty years, or who work night shifts without daytime napping, or sleep for more than ten hours per night on average may have an increased risk of cancer, according to a study published in Annals of Medicine.

Celebrating achievements in the humanities, arts and social sciences

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The Council for the Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences (CHASS) has announced the publication of a new book to showcase the significant contribution made by Australian academics to the fields of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences (HASS). Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences: It’s everyone’s business published on behalf of CHASS by Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group, was launched at a celebratory dinner at RMIT University in Melbourne to honour distinguished achievements in Australian research.

The link between corporate social responsibility and success in management

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How vital is it for leaders in modern business to be ‘socially responsible’? Can business ethics influence quality management? Recent open access research from Cogent Business & Management identifies key parallels between quality management and the importance of taking socially responsible steps in business.

New research shows dieting success may be hardwired into the brain

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Obesity and dieting are increasingly common in contemporary society, and many dieters struggle to lose excess weight. A new research paper, by Chen et al in Cognitive Neuroscience, studied the connections between the executive control and reward systems in the brain, and discovered the ability to self-regulate a healthy body weight may be dependent on individual brain structure.

An open letter to the presidential nominees from Change: the magazine of higher learning

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Taylor & Francis Group and the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA) are pleased to announce the publication of an open letter to the presidential nominees from Change: The Magazine of Higher Learning entitledHigher Education, The Road to American Success: An Open Letter to the Presidential Nominees” written by George Pernsteiner and Rebecca Martin.

How sweet it is: artificial sweeteners in blood

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A recent study by investigators at the National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive and Kidney Diseases at the National Institutes of Health measured how much artificial sweetener is absorbed into the blood stream by children and adults after drinking a can of diet soda.

Taylor & Francis partners with ReadCube to enhance discoverability of article and book collections

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Taylor & Francis, one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly content, today announced its partnership with publishing technology company, ReadCube. Through ReadCube’s Discover service, over four million Taylor & Francis journal articles and book chapters are now indexed and discoverable across ReadCube’s platform.  By incorporating popular features from Taylor & Francis Online with those of ReadCube’s reference management tools, scholars will enjoy a more immersive and productive research experience.

How the news media helped nominate Trump

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Donald Trump’s rise to Republican Presidential Nominee has raised important questions regarding the media’s relationship with political institutions and candidates. In “How the News Media Helped to Nominate Trump” Julia R. Azari offers valuable insight into how news media has come to work within, not against, the political institutions that shape nominations. This article is part of The Forum - a new section of Political Communication centered on dynamic scholarly review of books, articles, and ideas of importance to researchers, journalists, students, and the public.

Unprecedented insight into the Iran Deal

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A unique first-hand account of the negotiations leading to the Iran nuclear deal has been published by the former French Prime Minister, Laurent Fabius, in The Washington Quarterly. The article unflinchingly discloses the innermost workings of one of the most important agreements of international diplomacy of the new millennium.

New analysis sheds light on Zika virus evolution and spread

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In a study published in Pathogens and Global Health, researchers have modelled the evolutionary development and diversity of the Zika virus to better understand how infection spreads between populations and how the virus reacts with the immune system. Such an understanding is essential if an effective vaccine is to be developed.

Researchers describe new large prehistoric shark

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Megalolamna paradoxodon is the name of a new extinct shark described by an international research team who based their discovery on fossilized teeth up to 4.5 centimeters (1.8 inches) tall found from the eastern and western United States (California and North Carolina), Peru and Japan. The new study, "A new elusive otodontid shark (Lamniformes: Otodontidae) from the lower Miocene, and comments on the taxonomy of otodontid genera, including the 'megatoothed' clade,” will appear in the forthcoming issue of the international scientific journal, Historical Biology and online on October 3.

#allmalepanels – how to break the cycle of discrimination

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It might seem that equal rights have come a long way, but how far are we from true diversity and equality? New research by Cardiff Univeristy's Marysia Zalewski in the International Feminist Journal of Politics broaches the issue of endemic discrimination by looking at the all too common phenomena of ‘all male panels’.