Taylor & Francis Newsroom

, Oxford.

The secret to raising well behaved teens? Maximise their Zzzzz’s!

A new study from Taylor & Francis reveals youth’s irritability and laziness aren’t down to attitude problems but lack of sleep.

Recently published in the journal of Learning, Media and Technology, this interesting paper exposes the negative consequences of sleep deprivation caused by early school bells, and shows that altering education times not only perks up teens’ mood, but also enhances learning and health. 

It is no secret that human biology and education measure time in different ways; however, "our ability to function optimally [and learn], varies with biological time rather than conventional social times," explain the team leading the research.

When the two are more closely aligned, like in early years education, this is not so critical.

But things drastically change during adolescence, when "the conflict between social and biological time is greater than at any point in our lives", continue the academics.

Our sleep-wake cycle, or circadian rhythm, is the result of a complex balance between states of alertness and sleepiness regulated by a part of the brain called Suprachiasmatic Nucleus (SNC); in puberty, shifts in our body clocks push optimal sleep later into the evening, making it extremely difficult for most teenagers to fall asleep before 11.00pm.

This, coupled with early morning school starts, results in chronically sleep-deprived and cranky teens, as well as plummeting grades and health problems.

There is a body of evidence showing the benefits of synchronising education times with teens’ body clocks; interestingly, while "studies of later start times have consistently reported benefits to adolescent sleep health and learning, there [is no evidence] showing early starts have a positive impact on such things", add the researchers.

In spite of examples corroborating this theory —crucial is the case of the United States Air Force Academy, where a later start policy has been instrumental in trumpeting the marks of a group of 18–19 year olds —educators still fail to grasp it’s not laziness that keeps teens in bed in the morning but their biological clocks.

However, regardless of reluctance to alter the way things have always been done, a number of initiatives —including the Start School Later campaign and the establishment of the National Sleep Foundation —indicate a change may be in the air for education policies and practices in the U.S.

"Good policies should be based on good evidence and the data shows that children are currently placed at an enormous disadvantage by being forced to keep inappropriate education times", argue the team.

Will priorities be reshuffled to allow teenagers to cop some more z’s then? This still remains to be seen.

NOTE TO JOURNALISTS
When referencing the article: Please include Journal title, author, published by Taylor & Francis and the following statement:

* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17439884.2014.942666

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.   From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information please contact:
Diane Minvalla, Marketing Executive
Arts & Humanities Journals
Email: diane.minvalla@tandf.co.uk

, Oxford.

Change schools – not students – for more inclusive education

A study of Australian mothers’ attempts to access more appropriate schooling for their autistic children offers a new perspective on inclusive education policies and practices.

Writing in the International Journal of Inclusive Education, Rozanna Lilley of Macquarie University draws on the experiences of eight New South Wales families whose children needed to change primary schools.

Central to Lilley’s study were the experiences of the children’s mothers, who intervened and worked tirelessly with educators, bureaucrats, and therapists to secure the right education for their children – even when it meant the distress and trauma of changing school. Many struggled to convince the authorities that their children were suffering in their current setting; some even found themselves paying for additional help during school hours.

In the end, six of the eight mothers moved their children to more ‘segregated’ classroom settings, leading Lilley to conclude that it was the schools that were not adapting to the needs of students – not the other way round.

“The focus of the bureaucratic management of the differences presented by SDWA [students diagnosed with autism] is to concentrate on treating, containing and channelling the deficient child,” she writes. What her research suggests, however, is that if a truly inclusive education is desired, the focus should be on the ‘deficiencies of the classroom’ rather than those of the student.

Based on the mothers’ detailed accounts, Lilley turns the tables and suggests that many schools suffer from what she terms ‘Autism Inclusion Disorder’ (AID), the ‘symptoms’ of which mirror those of autism itself, including deficits in social communication and social interaction and restricted and repetitive behaviours. She outlines 10 defining features of ‘AID’, all of which were experienced by the mothers during their efforts to improve their children’s education.

Lilley concludes: “Despite the policy shift towards inclusive education in NSW, the reality is that for many parents of SDWA inclusion continues to be fragile, contingent and disappointing.”

“While some schools remain unable or unwilling to offer inclusive education, mothers, in the best interests of their children, will continue to make use of the segregated options that are available.”

Lilley warns that the early primary-school ‘drift’ towards segregation she observed should be a source of major concern for policymakers, and she is clear on the way forward for truly inclusive education: “We should be focusing on how schools, not students, need to change.” As such, this study is essential reading for educators, parents, and anyone concerned with improving the education of children with disabilities.

NOTE TO JOURNALISTS
When referencing the article: Please include Journal title, author, published by Taylor & Francis and the following statement:

* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13603116.2014.935813

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.   From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information please contact:
Lauren Harvey - Senior Marketing Coordinator
Education Journals
Email: lauren.harvey@tandf.co.uk

, Philadelphia.

The Librarians of Fukushima

Three years after the devastating Great East Japan Earthquake and Fukushima nuclear disaster, the librarians of Fukushima share their story in the latest issue of the Journal of Library Administration.

One of the largest earthquakes ever recorded in Japan's history, it caused the loss of more than 20,000 lives, the destruction of 240,000 buildings, and the evacuation of 400,000 people. Amongst the devastation, many libraries were either completely destroyed or severely damaged, and entire collections were lost.

The librarians of the region, with the aid of the Japan Library Association (JLA), the National Diet Library (NDL), “Save-MLAK” project (Museums, Libraries, Archives and Kominkan), and volunteers, continued to support the people in areas affected by the disaster by delivering donated books to evacuation sites, reading books to children, and setting up Bookmobiles.

Originally presented by the author, Shiho Suzuki, as a poster at the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA), this paper provides Suzuki’s first-hand account of her experience after the earthquake. She received the “Best Poster” award at IFLA 2013.

NOTE TO JOURNALISTS
When referencing the article: Please include Journal title, author, published by Taylor & Francis and the following statement:

* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/01930826.2014.946755

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.   From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.  For more information please contact:

Tara Golebiewski, Journals Marketing Associate

email: tara.golebiewski@taylorandfrancis.com

, Oxford.

Must women be seen to be heard?  Voice and gender bias in TV adverts.

This article in Communication and Critical/Cultural Studies examines the voice in TV advertising and its relation to visual image and gender.  Do advertising voiceovers affect consumer perceptions of gender?  Using quantitative and qualitative analysis, Pedelty & Kuecker test their hypotheses on these issues.  Their fascinating results reveal some thought provoking insights into audio visual media gender representations.

Having trawled through 1000 plus TV ads, it was found that 80% of voiceovers are male.  Moreover any female voiceovers are predominantly embodied by an attractive woman, whereas male voices are often disembodied or represented by both ugly and attractive men.  So, why is there such an imbalance in representation?  Does a woman have to be beautiful to be worth listening to?  Despite consumers’ ambivalence for gender of voiceover, some marketers claim a male voice to be more authoritative, more knowledgeable.  Going further male and female voices seem tailored to their role; men adopting characteristics such as adventure, technical knowledge, power and women being heard in relation to domestic settings, relationships and fulfilling nurturing roles.  Even deeper seated cultural, political and economic issues round the world further entrench the huge gender imbalance in media representation of women.  An infamous marketing dictum “men act, women appear” has come to fruition in TV advertising.

The proliferation of silent women in the “male gaze” seems to reinforce old prejudices and sexism which have long been balanced out in other areas; female competence appears frequently undermined in popular ads.  The authors’ qualitative studies of adverts also proved that representation of gender roles are largely rigid “men’s and women’s voices and bodies tend to be represented in ways that reify dualistic understandings of gender: man/woman, mind/body, culture/nature, public/private, business/domestic, active/passive, and so on”.  The authors stress the significance of voice in media representations of women.  They note “when a woman’s voice is present, she is not speaking to the population at large but to dogs, cats, babies, children, and women dieters”.  Should we agree with the authors that stereotyping of women in this way is highly problematic?


NOTE TO JOURNALISTS
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* Read the full article online: www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/14791420.2014.926015

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About the National Communication Association
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The National Communication Association (NCA) advances Communication as the discipline that studies all forms, modes, media, and consequences of communication through humanistic, social scientific, and aesthetic inquiry. NCA serves the scholars, teachers, and practitioners who are its members by enabling and supporting their professional interests in research and teaching. Dedicated to fostering and promoting free and ethical communication, NCA promotes the widespread appreciation of the importance of communication in public and private life, the application of competent communication to improve the quality of human life and relationships, and the use of knowledge about communication to solve human problems.

For more information, visit natcom.org, follow us on Twitter at @natcomm, and find us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/NationalCommunicationAssociation.

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.   From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.  For more information please contact:

Marita Eleftheriadou, Marketing Executive, Journals

email: Marita.Eleftheriadou@tandf.co.uk

, Oxford.

What does the future hold for Scottish culture?

With little more than a week to go until the Scottish Independence Referendum, debate rages over how a government of an independent Scotland might chose to execute its potential new found autonomy. However, there are of course areas of policymaking over which the Scottish Government has had power over since devolution - cultural policy being one of them. So as thoughts inevitably turn to the future, it is also worth looking back and considering how a devolved Scottish Government has made use of the powers it already has.

This month sees the publication of a special edition of the journal, Cultural Trends, which does just that. The journal offers five pieces of new research and two commentaries on the topic of Scottish cultural policy. These collectively consider what has been achieved, what has been sidelined and what still remains to be done. Including contributions from academics, consultants and those working in the sector, this special edition offers perspectives on the role of both popular and traditional music in cultural policy, the impact of museums on the shaping of national identity and reflections on both the consultations and conflicts that have surrounded the development of cultural policy in Scotland. Including a personal commentary from Janet Archer, CEO of Creative Scotland, this publication offers a timely reflection that will be of interest to academics and those working in cultural organisations both in Scotland and beyond.

NOTE TO JOURNALISTS

When referencing the journal, Please include the text: ‘Cultural Trends, published by Taylor & Francis’ and the following statement:
* Find out more about Cultural Trends at: http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/ccut20/23/3

Visit our newsroom at: http://newsroom.taylorandfrancisgroup.com

Follow us on Twitter @tandfnewsroom

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information please contact:
Jodie Bell, Senior Marketing Executive, Arts & Humanities Journals
email: jodie.bell@tandf.co.uk

, Philadelphia.

Examining the Understudied Pull of Personality on Adolescent Sexual Development & Experience

Open Access Article from The Journal of Sex Research

Can aspects of personality help explain a predilection towards risky sexual behaviors in developing adolescents? Researchers from Utrecht University approached this question by surveying middle adolescents of various personality types. Their findings are now available in an Open Access article from The Journal of Sex Research, the official publication of the Society for the Scientific Study of Sexuality.

Free Access Article
On Early Starters and Late Bloomers: The Development of Sexual Behavior in Adolescence Across Personality Types

Laura Baams, Geertjan Overbeek, Judith Semon Dubas & Marcel A. G. van Akens

The three most common personality types found across cultures and age groups are undercontrollers (extroverted, disagreeable, unconscientiousness, open to new experiences), overcontrollers (agreeable, conscientious, introverted, emotionally unstable), and resilients (agreeable, conscientious, open to experiences, extraverted, emotionally stable). Researchers hypothesized that undercontrolling adolescents would engage in more advanced, casual, and risky sexual behavior compared to their resilient and overcontrolling peers. Ninth grade students (average age 14.5 yrs.)  from seven high schools in the Netherlands were surveyed four times over an 18 month period regarding sexual behaviors/development and personality traits.

Subjects developed tendencies towards casual and risky sexual behaviors at similar rates across personality types. At the beginning of the study, however, survey data revealed more advanced, casual, and risky sexual behavior in undercontrolling subjects compared to their overcontrolling and resilient peers. Between overcontrollers and resilients, initial survey data showed the former engaging in more casual and risky sexual behaviors than the latter. Despite limitations inherent to its self-reporting methodology, the study makes an intriguing case for the link between personality type and sexual experience among middle adolescents.

NOTE TO JOURNALISTS
When referencing the article: Please include Journal title, author, published by Taylor & Francis and the following statement:

* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00224499.2013.802758

About The Journal of Sex Research

The Journal of Sex Research is a scholarly journal devoted to the publication of articles relevant to the variety of disciplines involved in the scientific study of sexuality. The journal is designed to stimulate research and promote an interdisciplinary understanding of the diverse topics in contemporary sexual science. The Journal of Sex Research is the official journal of the Society for the Scientific Study of Sexuality (SSSS). Members of SSSS receive an annual subscription to the journal as a benefit of membership. For more information, or to join, visit www.sexscience.org.

For more information about the journal, or to view the latest table of contents, visit www.tandfonline.com/hjsr.

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information please contact:
Melody Harris, Senior Marketing Associate, Journals
Email: melody.harris@taylorandfrancis.com

, Philadelphia.

Two Groundbreaking Articles from the Journal of Sex Research

Now Available Through Open Access

Routledge Journals is proud to announce the release of two innovative sex research papers, now available through Open Access from The Journal of Sex Research, the official publication of the Society for the Scientific Study of Sexuality.

In Identifying Effective Methods for Teaching Sex Education to Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities: A Systematic Review, researchers from Maastricht University point out both the importance of education in promoting sexual health among intellectually disabled persons, and the inadequacy of the sex education they receive. “Our review shows that detailed descriptions of methods used for sex education to individuals with intellectual disabilities are currently lacking in journal articles,” said lead author Dilana Schaafsma. “It is important that program developers and researchers do provide those detailed descriptions properly so that others can use that knowledge to understand what works and what doesn’t.”

University of Western Ontario researchers Ayden I. Scheim & Greta R. Bauer surveyed trans-Ontarians for their paper, Sex and Gender Diversity Among Transgender Persons in Ontario, Canada: Results from a Respondent-Driven Sampling Survey. Their findings carry important implications for policy, practice, and research. "Our research challenges narrow views of who trans(gender) people are, and how or if they transition sex/gender socially or medically,” said Scheim. “In recent years we've seen increased recognition of the need to include and affirm trans people in health care, research, and social and institutional policies. Our research highlights the need for practitioners and policymakers to ensure that their efforts are inclusive of the full spectrum of trans experiences, rather than assuming that most trans people wish to and will complete a linear transition from male to female, or vice versa."

Open Access Articles
Identifying Effective Methods for Teaching Sex Education to Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities: A Systematic Review

Dilana Schaafsma, Gerjo Kok, Joke M. T. Stoffelen & Leopold M. G. Curfs

Sex and Gender Diversity Among Transgender Persons in Ontario, Canada: Results from a Respondent-Driven Sampling Survey
Ayden I. Scheim & Greta R. Bauer
Access these articles online at www.tandfonline.com/HJSR- click on NEWS AND OFFERS.

NOTE TO JOURNALISTS
When referencing the article: Please include Journal title, author, published by Taylor & Francis and the following statement:

* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/hjsr

About The Journal of Sex Research

The Journal of Sex Research is a scholarly journal devoted to the publication of articles relevant to the variety of disciplines involved in the scientific study of sexuality. The journal is designed to stimulate research and promote an interdisciplinary understanding of the diverse topics in contemporary sexual science. The Journal of Sex Research is the official journal of the Society for the Scientific Study of Sexuality (SSSS). Members of SSSS receive an annual subscription to the journal as a benefit of membership. For more information, or to join, visit www.sexscience.org.

For more information about the journal, or to view the latest table of contents, visit www.tandfonline.com/hjsr.

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information please contact:
Melody Harris, Senior Marketing Associate, Journals
Email: melody.harris@taylorandfrancis.com

, Philadelphia.

Adjusting to Climate Change: Adapt or Face “Worst Case Scenario”

It is evident that atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) levels and global average temperature have been trending upward. There is scientific consensus that human activity has been contributing to climate change and that it is necessary to implement effective strategies at national and international levels to help reverse the trend in greenhouse gas emissions.

The paper by Drs. Frank Princioota and Daniel Loughlin, “Global Climate Change: The Quantifiable Sustainability Challenge,” published in the September 2014 issue of the Journal of the Air & Waste Management Association (JA&WMA), discusses the climate change problem, complementing the findings reported by Peterson et al. (see this paper in the February 2014 issue of JA&WMA) and provides the rationale for rapidly developing and deploying new technologies to mitigate and adapt to significant climate change.

NOTE TO JOURNALISTS
When referencing the article: Please include Journal title, Author, published by Taylor & Francis and the following statement:
* Read the full OPEN ACCESS article online:
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/10962247.2014.923351

Visit our newsroom at: http://newsroom.taylorandfrancisgroup.com/

Follow us on Twitter @tandfnewsroom

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About Taylor & Francis Group
-----------------------------------------

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information please contact:
Brian Evans, Senior Marketing Associate, Journals
Email: brian.evans@taylorandfrancis.com

NOTE TO JOURNALISTS
When referencing the article: Please include Journal title, author, published by Taylor & Francis and the following statement:

* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/10962247.2014.923351

, Philadelphia.

HIV-Positive Older Adults: Facing Unique Physical, Psychological & Social Challenges

A Special Issue from Behavioral Medicine

Routledge Journals is excited to announce the publication of Biopsychosocial Challenges of Older Adults Living with HIV (Volume 40, Issue 3, 2014), a special issue of Behavioral Medicine. Several articles are now available through free access, including the introduction, a look at the needs of older women with HIV/AIDS, and a study of the impact of HIV/AIDS and aging on brain function in older Latina/o patients. This special issue also takes a look forward at where age-specific HIV/AIDS research is headed.

In “Biopsychosocial Aspects of HIV and Aging,” Editor-in-chief Perry N. Halkitis and Associate Editor Timothy Heckman point out the importance of aging-specific HIV/AIDS research. By 2015, people ≥ 50 years of age will account for more than half of all HIV cases in the US. How does HIV/AIDS among this group differ from younger patients? How does it interact with the aging process across different ethnic and/or economic backgrounds? The authors maintain that these and other HIV/AIDS aging-related issues should be addressed “using approaches informed by a biopsychosocial lens as opposed to a purely biomedical one.”

In, “HIV/AIDS in Older Women: Unique Challenges, Unmet Needs,” Ramani Durvasula explains the necessity for empirical research focused on the needs of older women with HIV/AIDS. Recognition of the diverse composition and needs of this group are imperative in order to inform prevention, intervention, and best practices with this population of women. Moreover, older women living with HIV face unique challenges that require services that may be different from those tailored to men.

Aging and HIV/AIDS: Neurocognitive Implications for Older HIV-Positive Latina/o Adults” examines whether older Latina/o adults with HIV/AIDS experience more pronounced brain degeneration compared to their non-Hispanic white (NHW) counterparts. 126 HIV-positive adults, 84 Latina/o and 42 NHW, were tested on a wide variety of neurocognitive functioning. Latina/o participants ≥ 50 years old demonstrated greater impairment in processing and learning than ≥ 50 year old NHW subjects. Differences in memory and overall brain function were small, but trending towards significance. These disparities may be confounded by higher rates of stroke, diabetes, obesity, and hypertension among the HIV-positive Latina/o population, but further research is needed to distinguish between the influences of these risk factors. Overall, the findings point out the need for further research to expand treatment options and improve mental health outcomes for aging HIV-positive Latinas/os.

To conclude the issue, Charles A. Emlet reviews each of its six studies and suggests continued exploration in “Current Knowledge and Future Directions on Aging and HIV Research.” His commentary is a testament to the multitude of challenges faced by the growing and diverse population of interest. “HIV and aging research,” Emlet writes, “will both be challenged by the overwhelming complexity of the topic and be motivated to contribute to this landscape of knowledge which changes constantly.”

SPECIAL ISSUE FREE ACCESS ARTICLES – Download articles in PDF format at www.tandfonline.com/toc/vbmd20/40/3

About Behavioral Medicine
www.tandfonline.com/vbmd

Volume 40, 2014, 4 issues per year
Editor in Chief: Perry N. Halkitis , PhD, MS, MPH, New York University (@DrPNHalkitis)
1.143 Impact Factor and 1.595 5-Year Impact Factor © 2014 Thomson Reuters, 2013 Journal Citation Reports®

Behavioral Medicine is an interdisciplinary journal, which fosters and promotes the exchange of knowledge and the advancement of theory in the field of behavioral medicine, including but not limited to understandings of disease prevention, health promotion, health disparities, identification of health risk factors, and interventions targeting risk factors and disparities and enhancing health. The journal seeks to advance knowledge and theory in these domains in all segments of the population and across the lifespan, in local, national, and global contexts, and with an emphasis on the synergies that exist between biological, psychological, psychosocial, and structural factors as they relate to these areas of study and across health states.

NOTE TO JOURNALISTS
When referencing the article: Please include Journal title, author, published by Taylor & Francis and the following statement:

* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/vbmd20/40/3

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information please contact:
Veronica Sydnor, Marketing Manager, Journals
Email: veronica.sydnor@taylorandfrancis.com

, Philadelphia.

“Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Aging: The Role of Gerontological Social Work”

Special Triple Issue from the Journal of Gerontological Social Work

Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Aging: The Role of Gerontological Social Work”, a special triple issue from the Journal of Gerontological Social Work is now available for FREE ACCESS throughout September 2014.  The issue includes eighteen articles and focuses on lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender older adults and aging, an often unseen and marginalized subset of aging persons. 

The introduction to the special issues asks readers to “review each of the articles in this special issue in an effort to grasp the potential for the profession of social work to provide leadership with the LGBT aging population in all of these arenas, as well as in program development.”  The vast areas of research in this issue cast light on the broad diversity in the aging LGBT population.  Areas of concern include: human rights and policy; issues related to ageism, heterosexism, and gender identity; relations with families and relationships; social support networks; issues related to racial and multicultural identity; and health and mental health disparities. 

As stated in the introduction, the aim of this special issue is “to provide an array of scholarly literature on LGBT aging in an effort to raise awareness of pertinent issues facing this population. The particular focus is to build capacity in the discipline of social work so that gerontological social work scholars and practitioners have a voice in the multidisciplinary dialogue.” 

Guest Editor Noell L. Rowan adds, “This work is the first of its kind in a social work academic journal and the release of these articles is timely given the current political and social climate in America.” 

FREE ACCESS TRIPLE ISSUE - Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Aging: The Role of Gerontological Social Work (Volume 57, Issue 2-4, 2014) - Access this entire special triple issue of the Journal of Gerontological Social Work for the month of September 2014. Visit http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/wger20/57/2-4 to review and download all articles for the limited time.

About the Journal of Gerentological Social Work
www.tandfonline.com/WGER

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF: Michelle Putnam, PhD, Simmons College School of Social Work
Volume 57, 2014, 8 issues per year, Print ISSN 0163-4372, Online ISSN 1540-4048

With over 30 years of consistent, quality articles devoted to social work practice, theory, administration, and consultation in the field of aging, the Journal of Gerontological Social Work offers you the information you need to stay abreast of the changing and controversial issues of today's growing aging population.

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information please contact:
Veronica Sydnor, Marketing Manager, Journals
Email: veronica.sydnor@taylorandfrancis.com