Taylor & Francis Newsroom

, Oxford.

Using feminist theory to understand male rape

Decades of feminist research have framed rape and sexual assault as a ‘women’s issue’, leaving little room for the experiences of male victims. But a new study published in the Journal of Gender Studies suggests that feminist theory, with its focus on the gendered nature of rape, can also help us understand the stigmas, social constructions, and realities associated with male rape.

Aliraza Javaid of the University of York writes: ‘Feminism conceptualises rape as a violent act which, along with a consideration of hegemonic masculinity, may help us understand why male rape has been widely overlooked and discover whether social and gender expectations facilitate this neglect.’

He adds: ‘How a man perceives himself as a man and in what ways masculinities are formed within a social and cultural setting are vital to understanding male rape.’

To illustrate these points, Javaid refers to the work of key feminist scholars throughout his article, highlighting how some of the central notions – power, control, hegemonic masculinity and patriarchy – can produce difficulties for understanding male rape. Crucially, a focus on men as aggressors has meant less time spent focusing on men as victims and the consequent neglect of male victims as a subject for empirical study. The emphasis on rape as a women’s concern has also created practical problems for male victims, such as a shortage of male police officers trained to help them and fewer means of support.

Javaid discusses in detail how cultural ‘expectations’ of men and masculinity pose challenges for dealing with male rape. The widespread belief that men cannot be raped – either by women or other men – as well as the expectation that men do not show emotion, may contribute to the fact that men report rape at much lower rates than women. Falling victim to a crime that generally affects women challenges notions of ‘hegemonic masculinity’ and male power: male rape victims are 'judged, and judge themselves’ to be ‘failed men’ for not fighting off perpetrators.

Javaid concludes that the widespread neglect of male sexual assault by scholars ‘functions to maintain and reinforce patriarchal power relations and hegemonic masculinities’. But even worse than that, such neglect of the male experience of rape undermines the cause of gender equality for which so many strive.

This article is essential reading for Gender Studies scholars as well as those involved in supporting victims of rape – of either sex.

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About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.   From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.  For more information please contact:

Harriet Canavan, Marketing Executive, Journals
email: harriet.payne@tandf.co.uk

, Oxford.

United Versus City: who established Manchester’s footballing identity?

Manchester has one of the biggest rivalries in English Premiership Football and research by Gary James and Dave Day published in Soccer & Society has established who was responsible for giving Manchester the title as one of the biggest footballing cities in the world. In their article, “FA Cup Success, Football Infrastructure and the Establishment of Manchester’s Footballing Identity”, the authors discovered how the city’s first FA Cup success generated interest in the sport that then established Manchester as a true footballing city. “Football in Manchester was not embedded in the city’s life prior to the 1904 FA Cup success. It was mostly the dedicated followers of the city’s teams who paid notice to the game. But that all changed when Manchester City beat Bolton in the 1904 FA Cup final and the game established itself as part of the Mancunian way of life.”

The research identifies that this public interest was converted into football involvement in the weeks, months, and years that followed. Manchester’s clubs had a broad range of admission prices, meaning there was an appropriate offering for every class of fan, and that the clubs improved their venues to accommodate the new found interest. The number of football leagues and teams in the city grew at a rapid rate in the immediate aftermath of the 1904 FA Cup success, while pitch provision also improved. “When I set out I didn’t anticipate identifying how affordable the game was to Mancunians at this point but the further I explored the more I realised that Manchester’s football could only develop if the circumstances were right.….Football was open and available to all and that 1904 success led to the city being recognised for its strength of support and passion for the game. Over time both Manchester’s clubs were able to build on this and lay the foundations for Manchester’s position in the football world today.”

The research concludes that it is the current champions Manchester City who score the winner for launching Manchester’s success as one of the leading footballing cities in the world.

Gary James and Dave Day are members of the Sports & Leisure History Group at Manchester Metropolitan University.

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* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/14660970.2014.961378

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information please contact:
Leah Stanley, Marketing Executive
email: leah.stanley@tandf.co.uk

, Philadelphia.

New Innovative Open Access Content Available from the Journal of Addictive Diseases

Routledge is proud to announce the release of four Open Access articles from the current volume of Journal of Addictive Diseases, official journal of the American Osteopathic Academy of Addiction Medicine (AOAAM).

Bans on menthol tobacco have been proposed in Canada and the European Union under the widely held belief that the minty flavor and throat anesthetizing effect entices younger smokers and leads to stronger nicotine dependence. Findings from  Predictors, Indicators, and Validated Measures of Dependence in Menthol Smokers, however, challenge this belief through an extensive review of menthol dependence research and an original analysis of survey data from over 3500 menthol and nonmenthol smokers, “the largest sample to date,” said lead author Dr. Kimberley Frost-Pineda. The results “do not support that menthol increases cigarette dependence,” and find that “menthol smokers do not have an earlier age of first cigarette smoked or an earlier age of progression to regular smoking compared with nonmenthol smokers,” bringing the value of menthol-focused tobacco use prevention and cessation initiatives into serious question.

In Nonmedical Use of Prescription ADHD Stimulants and Preexisting Patterns of Drug Abuse, researchers set out to better understand the drug histories behind nonmedical use of prescription attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) stimulants. “The concern about nonmedical use of drugs often causes us to look at the characteristics of the drug, rather than characteristics of the users, for explanations,” said lead author Dr. Christine T. Sweeney. “Our analysis of national survey data shows that those who engage in the nonmedical use of prescription ADHD stimulant medications typically have an established history of drug use,” suggesting that prevention efforts should be geared towards those who’ve abused drugs other than ADHD stimulant medications.

Surveillance of Diversion and Nonmedical Use of Extended-Release Prescription Amphetamine and Oral Methylphenidate in the United States examines rates of nonmedical use and diversion of different types of ADHD medication with potential for abuse. “This study responds to interest in extended-release stimulants as a possible mechanism to improve adherence to treatment as well as concerns about diversion and nonmedical use,” said co-author Mark A. Sembower. The findings demonstrate that extended-release varieties carry some risk of abuse and diversion, but that “rates are low and there is little difference in rates between extended-release amphetamine and extended-release methylphenidate.”

Uniform Standards and Case Definitions for Classifying Opioid-Related Deaths: Recommendations by a SAMHSA Consensus Panel reports on a meeting of medical examiners, coroners, toxicologists, epidemiologists, and other concerned parties seeking to better address a pressing public health issue. Existing figures on the scope of prescription and illicit opioid use-related deaths are unreliable due to inconsistent data collection. Following an extensive literature review, the SAMHSA-assembled panel behind this report identified four areas in need of standardization—investigation, toxicological testing, case definitions, and cause-of-death classification.

 

About Journal of Addictive Diseases
Official journal of the American Osteopathic Academy of Addiction Medicine (AOAAM)

The Journal of Addictive Diseases provides original research and reviews of the latest relevant findings in etiology, epidemiology, and clinical care. The journal is known for its scholarly commitment to the field, and reflects the highest standards of investigation, clinical practice, medical education, and evaluation of patient care.

12th out of 34 journals in Substance Abuse with a 2013 Impact Factor of 1.792 © 2014 Thomson Reuters, Journal Citation Reports®

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About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

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Michael Hobson, Marketing Assistant, Journals
Email: michael.hobson@taylorandfrancis.com

, Melbourne.

Celebrating contributions to Australian cultural and intellectual life

Celebrating contributions to Australian cultural and intellectual life

Council for the Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences Prizes

Australia’s Council for the Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences (CHASS) has announced the winners of their 2014 prizes for contributions to Australian cultural and intellectual life. Iain McCalman won the 2014 CHASS Australia Prize for his book, The Reef — A Passionate History, and Dr. Sarah Kenderdine won the 2014 CHASS Australia Prize for Distinctive Work with Pure Land, an immersive and interactive 3D digital experience of the Dunhuang Caves, China.

Iain McCalman’s The Reef is the first social, cultural and environmental history of the Great Barrier Reef. He has this to say about his prize:

‘I am deeply honoured to have been awarded the inaugural CHASS prize for my book, The Reef — A Passionate History.  As someone who has been long been keenly appreciative of the important role that CHASS plays within the culture and industry of the Humanities, Arts and Social Science in Australia, it is an especial pleasure.  I am also humbled to have been on a short list that includes major books by such fine scholars as Mike Smith and Joan Beaumont.’

Dr. Sarah Kenderdine’s Pure Land virtually recreates Cave 220 at the Dunhuang Caves, one of 492 grottoes resplendent with Buddhist mural paintings over 1000 years old. She notes:

‘The Award celebrates the achievements of a team of 30 people in an interdisciplinary research community of art historians, animators, archaeologists, interaction designers, media artists, and software engineers.

The Award is highly significant because it acknowledges that with today's high fidelity digital imaging and displays, 'digital' is no longer a tool in service of the real. Pure Land offers us a context for powerful experiences of aura.’

This is the first year that the CHASS Prizes have been awarded and Routledge is very proud to have sponsored them. Sarah Blatchford, Taylor & Francis’ Regional Director for Australasia, said:

‘Routledge approached CHASS with a view to participating in their prize programme, by way of support for the Social Sciences, Arts and Humanities community in Australia.’

The Executive Director of CHASS, Emeritus Professor Steven Schwartz, has this to say:

“On behalf of CHASS, I would like to sincerely thank Routledge for their generous support of these Prizes, and of the humanities, arts and social sciences in general. We are very grateful for their vote of confidence in our mission to recognise and reward achievements in the humanities, arts and social sciences in Australia.”

Each prize, worth $3500, is part of the CHASS Australia Prizes program, which aims to draw international attention to Australia’s achievements in the humanities, arts and social sciences. Routledge are delighted to have had the opportunity to participate in the CHASS prize programme and sends warmest congratulations to the winners.

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine. From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information please contact:

Jenny Ellis, Marketing Co-Ordinator, Education
Email: Jennifer.Ellis@tandf.co.uk

, Oxford.

Resistance, Rights and Racism: Gypsies and Travellers on the English Green Belt

The battle between Gypsies, Travellers and the settled community over how land can be used has moved to the Green Belt, observes Peter Kabachnik of the City University of New York.

Writing in the Journal of Cultural Geography, Kabachnik notes that the current shortage of authorised caravan sites has led to one-third of the country’s nomadic population having no ‘legal place to live’. As a result, many travellers purchase, settle on and often get evicted from Green Belt land.

He observes: “These choices make Gypsies highly visible, as the land they are asserting their right to is more valuable, both economically and aesthetically, than the stopping places that were once more commonly used.”

These choices can also lead to conflict, but they demonstrate an increased sense of ‘agency’ among the travelling community, too; with few other options, many nomads are now challenging and resisting established norms and power relations ‘one caravan pitch at a time’.

To understand the travelling community’s experiences, Kabachnik conducted dozens of interviews. Here he draws heavily on the account of the extended ‘Jones’ family whose legal disputes with the council after developing a Green Belt site without permission – and subsequent evictions – are described in great detail. With 90% of planning applications made by Gypsies and Travellers denied in the first instance as opposed to 20% of those from the settled community, many families now own land they cannot live on.

Kabachnik argues that both more legal caravan sites and changes in the law are needed to reduce tensions between the settled and travelling communities. Since 1994, the travelling way of life has essentially been criminalised in England and Wales.

He concludes: “The laws and its application serve to structure nomad-sedentary relations, and the current legal sedentarist regime constructs those relations as adversarial … As it stands, racist hostility is enabled, produced and fuelled by the illegal status of Gypsies and travellers. The fact that Gypsies and Travellers are technically breaking the law legitimizes the fervent intolerance of many English townspeople.”

Traditionally seen as out of place in the city but also now not wanted in the countryside, many nomads are fighting for more than just the right to a home; they’re also fighting for a ‘right to a place’. Kabachnik’s study offers a unique perspective on this fight: that of the nomads themselves, not the media or local residents determined to drive them out, wherever they are.

NOTE TO JOURNALISTS
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* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/08873631.2014.941140

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information, please contact:

Alan Crompton, Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group Email: Alan.Crompton@tandf.co.uk Tel: +44 (20) 701 74225

, Oxford.

How to train your robot: can we teach robots right from wrong?

From performing surgery and flying planes to babysitting kids and driving cars, today’s robots can do it all. With chatbots such as Eugene Goostman recently being hailed as “passing” the Turing test, it appears robots are becoming increasingly adept at posing as humans. While machines are becoming ever more integrated into human lives, the need to imbue them with a sense of morality becomes increasingly urgent. But can we really teach robots how to be good?

An innovative piece of research recently published in the Journal of Experimental & Theoretical Artificial Intelligence looks into the matter of machine morality, and questions whether it is “evil” for robots to masquerade as humans.

Drawing on Luciano Floridi's theories of Information Ethics and artificial evil, the team leading the research explore the ethical implications regarding the development of machines in disguise. 'Masquerading refers to a person in a given context being unable to tell whether the machine is human,' explain the researchers – this is the very essence of the Turing Test. This type of deception increases “metaphysical entropy”, meaning any corruption of entities and impoverishment of being; since this leads to a lack of good in the environment – or infosphere – it is regarded as the fundamental evil by Floridi. Following this premise, the team set out to ascertain where 'the locus of moral responsibility and moral accountability’ lie in relationships with masquerading machines, and try to establish whether it is ethical to develop robots that can pass a Turing test.

Six significant actor-patient relationships yielding key insights on the matter are identified and analysed in the study. Looking at associations between developers, robots, users, and owners, and integrating in the research notable examples, such as Nanis' Twitter bot and Apple's Siri, the team identify where ethical accountabilities lie – with machines, humans, or somewhere in between?

But what really lies behind the robot-mask, and is it really evil for machines to masquerade as humans?  'When a machine masquerades, it influences the behaviour or actions of people [towards the robot, as well as their peers]', claim the academics. Even when the disguise doesn't corrupt the environment, it increases the chances of evil as it becomes harder for individuals to make authentic ethical decisions. Advances in the field of artificial intelligence have outpaced ethical developments and humans are now facing a new set of problems brought about by the ever-developing world of machines. Until these issues are properly addressed, the question whether we can teach robots to be good remains open.

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* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/0952813X.2014.948315

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information, please contact:

Ben Hudson, Taylor & Francis Group

Email: Benjamin.Hudson@tandf.co.uk

, Oxford.

Do cycle lanes increase safety of cyclists from overtaking vehicles?

Cycling is well known to improve individual health and fitness; it also benefits the wider population in terms of economy, road congestion and environmental impact. Governments and the EU promote cycling via many initiatives to achieve sustainable, clean and energy efficient transport systems. However, despite benefits outweighing the risks by 20:1, many consider the risk too great and fear of perceived danger on the road needs to be tackled. Cycle lanes have been used to improve cyclists’ safety and encourage more cyclists onto the road. This research in Transport aims to study the impact of cycle lanes on cyclist safety in terms of passing space given by overtaking vehicles.

In this study, the authors used a bicycle equipped with cameras to record  vehicle overtakes in varying road situations to determine whether cycle lanes, colour block cycle lanes or no cycle lanes affect passing distances and cyclist stability/safety. Their 3 comparisons, measuring vehicle passing widths found greater overall distances given with a cycle lane than without. Colour block vs. uncoloured cycle lane showed little or no difference as did no cycle lane vs. colour block cycle lane. Colour block lanes had a slight negative effect suggesting that drivers are more careful when cycle lanes have less definition.
 
Fascinatingly the authors conclude that other factors have a far greater impact on cyclist safety than presence or absence of cycle lane. Road width, parking, opposing vehicle flow and speed were critical influences on decreased passing widths. The authors also note that driver behaviour is a hugely important and unquantified factor, they urge more qualitative research in this area and note “in order to reduce perceived risk and encourage more cycling…reducing or calming existing motorised traffic must be explored first…lane width is the most significant variable to achieve a sufficient vehicle passing distance…the provision of narrow (<2 m) cycle lanes …may be insufficient…Reconsideration of the entire road design and further exploration of driver behavioural factors is required.

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* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.3846/16484142.2014.953205

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.  From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

Luke Antieul – Marketing Executive, Engineering Journals, Taylor & Francis Group.
Email: luke.antieul@tandf.co.uk
Tel: +44 (0)20 7551 9777

, Oxford.

Fossilised bird egg offers clues to Brazil’s prehistoric past

Brazilian scientists have discovered a near-intact fossilised bird egg – the country’s first – in Sao Paulo State.

As Julio Cesar de A. Marsola and his colleagues explain in the journal Alcheringa, their discovery is significant for many reasons. Compared to the abundance of eggs from non-avian dinosaurs, finds of complete eggs from Mezosoic birds are relatively scarce.

Although no remains were found inside this particular egg, known formally as LPRP USP-0359, the team’s extensive tests revealed important information about both the egg itself and its wider context. Their observations suggest that LPRP-USP0359 is, in fact, one of the smallest and thinnest shelled Mesozoic bird eggs ever found.

Moreover, similarities between the Brazilian egg and specimens from Argentina suggests an affinity between them as Ornithothoraces. Given further similarities in where and how the eggs were found, the researchers suggest that the two birds may also have preferred the same types of breeding and nesting habitats – important clues that will help palaeontologists build up a more detailed picture of South America’s Mesozoic past.

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* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/03115518.2014.926449

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information, please contact:

Alan Crompton, Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group Email: Alan.Crompton@tandf.co.uk Tel: +44 (20) 701 74225

, Oxford.

Government guidance on the Care Act 2014: supporting change or the status quo?

UK government guidance on the Care Act 2014 appears to contradict the revolutionary aim of the Act itself – to put people in control of their own support – claim two academics from Brunel University.

Writing in the journal Disability and Society, Colin Slasberg and Peter Beresford dissect the draft guidance issued in June, and which is expected to form council policy and practice across the country.

Instead of guiding councils to take the person-centred approach enshrined in the legislation, Slasberg and Beresford conclude that the guidance simply encourages councils to perpetuate the current approach: a ‘system of eligibility that leads to practices that are resource-led, not person-centred or needs-led’.

Chief among the pair’s objections to the guidance is the lack of a strategic outcome for service users. The guidance explicitly refuses to define a ‘standard of wellbeing’ that should be aspired to by a care service; controversially, in their view, the guidance also rejects the established concept of ‘independent living’.

While the guidance confirms the Act’s view that individuals are best placed to judge their own wellbeing, it also reinforces the fact that final decisions about a person’s care continue to remain with the council. The guidance also neglects to provide help to councils in making difficult decisions about which of its residents’ needs it can support (and which it cannot) while trying to stay on budget.

The authors conclude: ‘Wittingly or otherwise, the effect [of the guidance] is to create a smokescreen for the continuation of a system that has served short-term political objectives well, but has been anathema to the person-centred system that government claims to want.’

There is, however, an alternative. Slasberg and Beresford believe that it is possible to create a person-centred, needs-based system – but only if the 2014 Care Act is interpreted and enacted in such a way that brings about real, systemic change. They outline their vision for such an approach, complete with strategic outcomes, holistic assessments of needs and transparency from councils about resource limitations. They also suggest that councils hoping to create an ‘alternative future’ for their care services could refer to the Act directly, and disregard the guidance.

This article provides substantial insight into both the current reality and future of our overstretched care system. It also highlights significant differences of opinion about what that future of care could – or should – be.

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About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.   From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information please contact:
Lauren Harvey - Senior Marketing Coordinator
Education Journals
Email: lauren.harvey@tandf.co.uk

, Philadelphia.

Taylor & Francis Sponsors ER&L Conference Student Travel Award

Taylor & Francis Group is very pleased to be a returning sponsor of the Student Travel Award at the Electronic Resources & Libraries (ER&L) Conference for the third consecutive year. This grant will be awarded to two library and information science students, who will be selected by an ER&L committee. The award includes conference registration, air travel costs, and accommodation totaling $1,500 per winner.

The Student Travel Award is open to currently enrolled students who are not currently registered for the 10th Anniversary ER&L Conference in 2015. Both U.S. and International applicants are eligible and welcome to submit. Additional information regarding the award application requirements, as well as the link to apply, can be found here: http://electroniclibrarian.org/erlplus/tandfstudent/. Please note that the application deadline is November 5th, 2014.

As dedicated supporters of the information community, Taylor & Francis enthusiastically encourages all interested library and information science students to take advantage of this hands-on opportunity to learn more about innovative technologies and trends within their field.

Follow this link http://electroniclibrarian.org/conference-info/ to see the full range of workshops, sessions, and other exciting events that are lined up at the ER&L Conference, which will be held on February 22-25, 2015 in Austin, TX.

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life. As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works, our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioral Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information, please contact:
Stacy Sieck, Library Communications Manager - the Americas
stacy.sieck@taylorandfrancis.com
+1 (215) 606-4205