Taylor & Francis Newsroom

, Oxford.

Go fish! Ancient birds evolved specialist diving adaptations

A new study of some primitive birds from the Cretaceous shows how several separate lineages evolved adaptations for diving.

Living at the same time as the dinosaurs, Hesperornithiform bird fossils have been found in North America, Europe and Asia in rocks 65–95 million years old. Dr Alyssa Bell and Professor Luis Chiappe of the Dinosaur Institute, Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County, have undertaken a detailed analysis of their evolution, showing that separate lineages (see Fig.1 below) became progressively more adept at diving into water to catch fishes, like modern day loons and grebes.

The Hesperornithiformes are a highly derived but very understudied group of primitive birds from the Cretaceous period. This study is the first comprehensive phylogenetic analysis, or evaluation of evolutionary relationships, to ever be undertaken on the entire group.

The results of this study confirm that the Hesperornithiformes do form a single group (or clade), but that within this group the inter-relationships of the different taxa are more complex than previously thought. Additionally, this study finds that anatomical changes were accompanied by enlargement in overall body size, which increased lung capacity and allowed deeper diving.

Overall, this study provides evidence for understanding the evolution of diving adaptations among the earliest known aquatic birds.

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* Read the full article online:http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14772019.2015.1036141

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

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Alan Crompton, Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group

Email: Alan.Crompton@tandf.co.uk

Tel: +44 (20) 701 74225

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, Oxford.

Migrants vs Italian natives: A comparison of educational journeys

Migrant boats in the Mediterranean have dominated recent headlines. However, little attention has been given to some of the longer-term impacts of this recent migratory trend. This includes the educational opportunities for migrant children in comparison to that of their counterparts in Italy, a country at the forefront of the current “migrant crisis”. New research just published in the Journal of Applied Statistics examines the disparity of educational levels between Italian natives and migrants, exploring which contributes most: student performance or choice?

The authors of this study conducted a statistical analysis to determine the extent of primary vs. secondary effects on native-migrant education gaps in Italy. Primary effects for migrant children include language barriers and cultural differences, resulting in migrant children being less able to meet the educational demands expected for their age level. Secondary effects include parents being poorly informed about the educational opportunities available to their children, to the detriment of good decisions, educational investment and subsequent educational progression. 

Past research has shown that – when allowing for socio-economic background – migrant children sustain a disadvantage, perform worse than native peers and are less likely to progress to tertiary education. To what extent is this due to low levels of previous academic attainment? Are poor assessment of labour market returns and hesitance to invest in further education responsible? The authors studied probability differences of nativity status, social background, prior performance and upper secondary school choices on 5,751 Italian students, 732 of whom were of immigrant origin.  76% of migrant students had working class parents in contrast to 28% of natives. The final exam grades of migrant secondary students were lower, and the probability of their choosing less challenging vocational courses twice as high as natives. 

The research revealed that in many cases the educational gap is not accounted for by migrant students’ lower grades, but by different decision making processes. In some instances, comparisons of social backgrounds and performance show migrants to be more ambitious than natives. However, overall this study concludes that “results point to different decision rules between children of immigrants and natives that make the former more likely – given social background and prior performance – to enrol in school careers that prevent them access to tertiary education.”  This effect is principally true for boys; girls’ shortened school careers are mainly due to poor performance. This is a likely reflection of gender interpretations stemming from traditionalist origin countries.

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* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/02664763.2015.1036845

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information, please contact:

Ben Hudson, Taylor & Francis Group

Email: Benjamin.Hudson@tandf.co.uk

Follow us on Twitter @tandfnewsroom

, Philadelphia.

Absence of Self-Control Is a Predictor of Proneness to Security Violations

A recent study published in the Journal of Management Information Systems (JMIS) shows that absence of self-control is a predictor of an employee becoming a security risk in organizations. “The Role of Self-Control in Information Security Violations: Insights from A Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective” is written by Qing Hu, Robert West and Laura Smarandescu of Iowa State University.

The researchers used a brain imaging technology, electroencephalography (EEG), to examine the brain activation levels and regions of individuals in scenario-based laboratory experiments in which the subjects were considering information security violations. The researchers found that self-control is a major factor that differentiates whether an individual may or may not violate established information security policies and procedures in organizations.

Individuals with low self-control display lower levels of neural activities in brain regions known to perform cognitive control functions that govern rational behavior.  They also use less time to make decisions related to information security violations. Thus, these individuals pose a greater threat to organizational information security. These findings question the effectiveness of security-education training commonly used in organizations, given the strong evidence of neurological roots of low self-control.

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* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/07421222.2014.1001255

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.   From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information please contact:
Katie Semple
Taylor & Francis Journals
Email: katherine.semplen@taylorandfrancis.com

, Oxford.

Activists or anarchists? How the global press reports on the ‘hacktivism’ of Anonymous

A study of global media reporting on the activities of the ‘hacktivist’ group Anonymous has revealed that the press generally portrays them as simple pranksters – even though the vast majority of their operations are motivated by the defence of free speech or political causes.

To reach this conclusion, Howard University academic Adam G. Klein undertook content and frame analysis of 200 articles from 44 media outlets in 10 different countries over the space of a year.  His research, published in the National Communication Association’s Communication Monographs, analysed the specific characteristics given to Anonymous in the press as well as the general tone of the coverage. He also studied the media response to four ‘operations’ in depth, including attacks on the websites of the Los Angeles Times and PayPal.

Klein found that the press framed Anonymous in one of four ways: legitimate activists, vigilante heroes, global threats or malicious pranksters – with the last two more common than the first two. “The findings presented a stark disparity between the news media’s interpretation and the hacktivists’ own words and actions,” Klein writes. “In fact, of the 200 articles examined, 108 (54%) covered Anonymous in a negative light, more than double the number of positive news stories (25%). Such a clear indication of the news media’s adverse response to Anonymous was found in story after story in which the journalists trumpeted the actions of hackers as damaging, disruptive and/or criminal.”

Klein further argues that: “The research showed how the global press was typical in its framing of hactivists as being mere pranksters in spite of available evidence pointing to concrete motives, such as the fight for government transparency or defence of gay rights.” Furthermore, the media tended to focus on the victims of hactivism, “downplaying or altogether disregarding the group’s motivations”. Klein also notes that in the articles casting Anonymous members as pranksters, “they were seldom referred to as ‘hactivists’, or with any distinction that would give explanation to their actions.”

Several factors may account for the global media’s surprisingly negative view of Anonymous. Klein suggests that “political-economic forces, namely pro-corporate and self-preserving inclinations of big media” could account for their adverse response to many specific operations, especially those directed at “allies or institutional interests.” Despite any common ground as ‘media activists’ it may also be difficult for traditional news outlets, generally in favour of free speech, to legitimise the invasive forms of protest that silence others, as favoured by the ‘hacktivists’.

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* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/03637751.2015.1030682

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.   From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.  For more information please contact:

Marita Eleftheriadou, Marketing Executive, Journals

email: Marita.Eleftheriadou@tandf.co.uk

, Oxford.

Teacherbot: Can robots do it better?

Opinion is often divided over whether digital innovations within education are a value or a threat to teaching.

Recently published in Teaching in Higher Education the article 'Teacherbot: interventions in automated teaching' by Sian Bayne tests digital education and human/non-human teaching by experimenting with ‘Botty’ the Teacherbot.

This study revisits the notion of teacher automation within higher education; exploring how teachers might enact new, resistant ways of playing with the boundaries of human and machine. It also examines the threat that digital education and teacher automation could pose to teacher professionalism.

The author argues that the point here is not that automated methods are undesirable, but the terms on which they are proposed are driven by productivity-oriented solutionism which has been critiqued for decades. How can we continue to value teaching within a culture defined by the achievements of technology and digital data?

Bayne’s conclusion is that the Teacherbot worked with the idea that teacher automation does not need to be about clarity. 'Botty’ was not intended to replace or solve teachers’ problems, but to explore how the association of teacher-student-code might be pedagogically productive.

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* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/10.1080/13562517.2015.1020783

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.   From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.


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Katie Whittington
Journals Marketing Coordinator
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Follow us on Twitter @tandfnewsroom

, Philadelphia.

Arizona: “One of nature’s best natural laboratories for weather”

The state of Arizona, long known for its desert climate and hot summers, hosts an array of surprising weather contrasts. Many identify the state as warm and dry; however, violent flash floods and even heavy snowstorms typically occur each year.

According to a recent article published in Weatherwise, titled 'The Weather and Climate of Arizona', extreme weather events, ranging from “heat to cold and dryness to floods… dust storms, forest fires, and unparalleled lightning displays” are all too common in  Arizona. As a result, the state has been named “one of nature’s best natural laboratories for weather” by the article’s authors, Ronald L. Holle, Nancy Selover, Randy Cerveny, and H. Michael Mogil.

Arizona has many noteworthy physical contrasts, ranging from long-spanning deserts to volcanic peaks and some of the world’s most famous canyons. However, the state’s contrasts extend well beyond its physical landforms – elevations in altitude and moisture levels can make the weather wildly erratic throughout the year. Every location has exceeded 90 degrees Fahrenheit, yet every location has also experienced below freezing temperatures. As the authors claim, “Arizona remains not only a place of great beauty, but also a place of great weather.”

Ultimately, while Arizona is generally sunny throughout the year, there is always an opportunity for an extreme weather event. While these climactic events are often rare, the authors note that many climatologists and meteorologists remain drawn to the state and its possible weather fluctuations. Whether it be “violent flashfloods to stark aridity” or “the bitter cold of the mountains to the blazing heat of the deserts,” one thing is certain: Arizona seems to earn its title of “one of the world’s best natural laboratories for weather.”

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* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/10.1080/00431672.2015.997548

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.   From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

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Kylie Dougherty
Science & Technology Journals Marketing Assistant
Taylor & Francis Group
530 Walnut Street, Suite 850
Philadelphia, PA 19106
Tel: (215) 606-4168
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e-mail: kylie.dougherty@taylorandfrancis.com

, Oxford.

PartySmart: Could the infamous ‘hangover’ become extinct?

It’s a Sunday morning, you didn’t get back home until 3:30am, your head is banging, your throat is sore and to top it off, your mouth is dry. Later the fatigue will kick in, making it impossible to leave your bed.  Welcome to the dreaded hangover.  Now wouldn’t it be good if the infamous ‘hangover’ were to become extinct?

In an article from Anthropology & Medicine, Laurent Pordié delves into the introduction and marketing of polyherbal drug called PartySmart.

This drug purports to protect the liver and prevent alcohol-related hangovers. Established by The Himalaya Drug Company in India in 2005, PartySmart should be consumed thirty minutes prior to alcohol consumption to prevent symptoms such as headache, nausea, irritability and fatigue.

Local revellers in India were delighted with the drug, proclaiming how fresh they felt the morning after drinking: ‘We were fine, fresh and ready to go again ... we never forget to swallow this nifty little pill called PartySmart.’

That’s not to say there haven’t been headaches in marketing the product. Aggressively promoted in clubs and pubs, there’s been controversy over the portrayal of promoting alcohol consumption amongst the middle classes in such a devout region. Such is the stigma behind the moral and ethical issues of PartySmart (and therefore alcohol) consumption that CEO of The Himalaya Drug Company, went so far as to proclaim “Our message is ‘PartySmart was the outcome of some very good research out here, and they said ‘listen, we have this fantastic product that actually cures hangovers, why don’t we sell it?’ I said, yes let’s do it. The Chairman is very clear, he said ‘look, I don’t encourage drinking'.”

So how does a world specialist in hangover prevention, based in a country where the use of alcohol is disparaged, market such a controversial drug? Well, for a start, they revise their strategy heralding the product as ‘targeting liver disorders’, thus ridding themselves of the moral repercussions of alcohol consumption, make it available via prescription only and market it instead to pharmaceutical reps in India and abroad. Gone is the colourful packaging and easy availability replaced instead with simplified design and new slogan, in order to best demonstrate a reputable and effective polyherbal drug. This nifty tactic affords the drug’s marketability to biomedical practitioners who in turn provide credibility, securing a legitimate legacy for PartySmart.

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* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/10.1080/13648470.2015.1004773

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life. As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, e-books and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.  From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information please contact:
Steven Turner, Marketing Coordinator
Journals Marketing
email: steven.turner@tandf.co.uk

, Oxford.

Walking dead gone viral: crisis communication and humorous messages in the social media age

As far as pop culture goes, it is hard to beat the current zombie upsurge; from TV drama like 'The Walking Dead' to movies such as 'Resident Evil', the devilish figures have invaded public consciousness. They are apparently popular in public relations, too, judging by the number of campaigns using zombie-related humour to generate buzz on social media platforms. But how successful are these PR strategies in the context of risk communication? A new study published in the National Communication Association’s Journal of Applied Communication Research looks deep into this matter, and reveals the match between social media and humour may not be made in heaven, after all.

Authored by Julia Daisy Fraustino and Liang Ma, the study presents an in-depth analysis of the Atlanta-based Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) “zombie apocalypse” all-disaster-preparedness campaign, and uncovers the benefits and the pitfalls of using social media and pop culture-referencing humour in the context of crisis communication.

Launched on social media in May 2011, the 'Preparedness 101: Zombie Apocalypse' campaign was aimed at engaging the U.S. public with the tactics needed to best survive a zombie attack–the idea being that withstanding a zombie attack will prepare people for any emergency. While the stunt was unquestionably successful, whether it encouraged people to take preparedness actions was less clear. “Social media facilitate communication” and interactions, especially in times of crisis, explains the team leading the research, but when humour is thrown into the mix, things become ambiguous.

"Light-heartedness reduces…critical thinking,” increasing the tendency to accept communication content, and comical messages can “trivialise the perceived seriousness of a topic,” weakening people’s intention to safeguard themselves, adds the team. To further investigate the matter, the academics employed three distinct research methods, including a phone interview with a CDC zombie-campaign manager and an in-depth analysis of marketing materials including key evaluation metrics, both designed to allow the CDC to ascertain the success of the apocalypse campaign.

Also, an online field experiment was carried out to establish the effects of medium form (social media vs. traditional) and message form (humorous vs. non- humorous) on recipients; to this end, 232 college students were randomly exposed to four adaptations of the original apocalypse campaign–a blog, a newsletter, and a comic as well as serious version of the zombie message–and then were asked to rank their ‘readiness to act’ by completing a questionnaire.

Results showed campaign goals had been achieved from the CDC’s viewpoint, and the medium form had no impact on the behaviour of the observed sample. However it was confirmed that a “tongue in cheek stance towards disaster communication trivialises perceived importance,” as evidenced by the students who were shown the comical version of the zombie message manifesting weaker intentions to take protective action. So, while humorous strategies can launch campaign messages into the spotlight, because of significant consequences on audiences’ behaviour and well-being, more caution and attention are needed from professionals using social media and humour in a risk communication context.

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* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/10.1080/00909882.2015.1019544

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.   From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.  For more information please contact:

Marita Eleftheriadou, Marketing Executive, Journals

email: Marita.Eleftheriadou@tandf.co.uk

, Philadelphia.

What’s the Forecast? Cutting off the supply of psychoactive substances

New Research Hopes to Forecast Novel Psychoactive Substance Use by the Public

The use of novel psychoactive substances – synthetic compounds with stimulant or hallucinogenic effects – is on the rise.  The diversity and breadth of these substances has led policymakers, law enforcement officers, and healthcare providers alike to feel overwhelmed and underprepared for dealing with novel drugs. A recent article published in The American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse proposes a "forecasting method" for policymakers and researchers to focus on what is likely to happen with new recreational drugs.

Using a review of literature, published case reports, and legal studies, Dr. John Stogner of UNC Charlotte, proposes a five step forecasting method.  The method relies on the availability of a potential user base, the costs of the drug (legal and otherwise), the subjective experience, the substance’s dependence potential, and the overall ease of acquisition.

"Forecasting allows for training focused on those compounds they are most likely to encounter," explained Stogner.  "I wanted to author a plan that encouraged early action - a plan that would help highlight which potentially emergent drug would reach young people in advance, cutting off supply before the next 'spice' or 'bath salts' reached store shelves."
   
The five-step forecast method claims that use of e-cigarettes and Acetyl fentanyl (painkillers with potential of hallucinogenic effects) will grow, but that use of Bromo-Dragonfly and similar substances will not.  "You'll likely see Leonotis leonurus (a psychoactive plant from the Mint family referred to as lion’s tail or dagga) hit store shelves soon, but the bigger worry will be synthetics," Stogner warns.  "A single chemical substitution to an existing drug may make it legal. Most of the newly designed drugs fall into the stimulant category, but others more closely resemble opioids."

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* Read the full article online:http://informahealthcare.com/doi/full/10.3109/00952990.2014.998367

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information please contact:
James Fischer, Marketing Associate, Journals
Email: james.fischer@taylorandfrancis.com

, Oxford.

Bathroom Graffiti: From phallic doodles and insults to humour, satire and supportive messages

A new article recently published in Gender, Place & Culture examines how men and women express masculinity and femininity in the seemingly private and anonymous spaces of public bathrooms.

The first major study of bathroom graffiti was produced by the famous academic Alfred Kinsey in the 1950’s, which found that many wall inscriptions were highly sexual, but sexuality was defined quite differently among men and women. Whereas men's bathroom graffiti centred on sexual acts and sexual organs, women's graffiti referred to love and relationships in non-erotic terms. Further studies in the 70’s and 80’s suggested that women’s graffiti was becoming more sexual and political, suggesting a lowering of female sexual inhibitions.Fig.1 Graffiti in female bathroom stalls tend to be supportive.

In this curious study, 60 years on from Kinsey’s work, Pamela Leong - an assistant professor of Sociology at Salem State University - monitored graffiti in 10 single sex bathrooms; 5 male, 5 female in a US university serving many disadvantaged and low-income students. The text or drawings in the bathroom stalls, while created in a private space and presumably during a very private moment, are meant to be public, as they transmit ideas, images, and even responses.

Leong found that women were more prolific, accounting for 70% of graffiti, at first glance bucking expectation of higher moral conduct. However male graffiti was often overtly sexual, crude, competitive
and aggressive; references to sex acts, male and female genitalia and homophobia were frequent, but also more humour as well as some insults. Female graffiti was less sexually explicit; messages were more relationship oriented, confided private thoughts and feelings, as well as messages of support to fellow writers. (See Fig.1) Women often referred to bowel movements, indicating a need to discuss such things privately for fear of being judged ‘dirty’ or unfeminine; a contrast to social acceptance of male lavatorial behaviour.

It is known that extreme and irreverent voices are often channelled through graffiti in the absence of a physical audience. Bravado aside, Leong has highlighted stark differences between male and female graffiti which reinforce heterosexual masculine power and female subordination. She notes:

“even in anonymous spaces some people are more equal than others…graffiti… serve to discipline gender through the intolerance of anything feminine…and…reveal relationships of power”.

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* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/0966369X.2014.991705

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information, please contact:

Alan Crompton, Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group

Email: Alan.Crompton@tandf.co.uk

Tel: +44 (20) 701 74225

Follow us on Twitter @tandfnewsroom