Taylor & Francis Newsroom

, Oxford.

Can living organisms withstand extreme hydrostatic pressures?

It should be impossible for organisms to survive in pressures equivalent to those just above the lower mantle of the earth. Yet recent research in Cogent Physics suggests that living organisms can survive, or nearly survive, after exposure to ultra-high pressures; that some small animals and dried eggs can tolerate the very high hydrostatic pressure for up to an hour.

Interdisciplinary research published in Cogent Physics, from authors at the Okayama University of Science in Japan, shows that tardigrades (Milnesium tardigradum) in a dehydrated state and Artemia salina (a kind of plankton, called brine shrimp) cists (dried eggs) can tolerate the very high hydrostatic pressure of 7.5 GPa (75,000 atmosphere), and nearly survive after exposure to 20 GPa, corresponding to the depth of 550–600 km below the earth’s surface.

These findings are in contrast to established knowledge that proteins began to unfold around 0.3 GPa, and the denaturation of proteins usually takes place below 1 GPa, where most bacteria and many other organisms die, and that under ultra-high pressure, molecules and atoms that comprise the body are fixed too tightly to let organisms breathe.

NOTE TO JOURNALISTS

When referencing the article: Please include Journal title, author, published by Cogent OA and the following statement:

* Read the full article online: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/23311940.2016.1167575

About Cogent OA

Cogent OA is an open access publisher of scholarly research committed to offering a truly author-centered service. Our aim is to help researchers share their ideas and discoveries as widely and as effectively as possible.

We offer all the traditional services such as thorough peer review and high quality online presentation, but are adding to these new ideas to help ensure our authors' work has maximum global impact.

As part of the Taylor & Francis Group – an Informa business – we are building on solid foundations and maintain the traditional values and high standards of an organization with more than 200 years of experience serving the research community.

For more information, please contact:

Craig Teall, Marketing Executive – Cogent OA
craig.teall@CogentOA.com

www.CogentOA.com

, Oxford.

Gender as important as race when predicting votes in US election

New research published in Cogent Social Sciences reveals that Republican and Democrat party positions on women’s rights are a major predictor of the vote for President in the US elections.

Using data from the American National Election Studies [ANES], this new article examines the role of gender in US elections. The research uncovers that what matters to voters is not simply their own biological sex but their attitudes about appropriate social roles for men and women. Republican and Democrat candidates take opposing views on many women’s issues, and voters view Democrats as more supportive than Republicans of equality for women and reproductive rights.

In the 2008 election, perceptions of party differences on women’s issues had greater impact on the choice of white voters than opinions on many other issues, including gay marriage and the economy.

"Gender is often seen as less important than race when examining voter opinion,’ said author of the research Susan B. Hansen, Professor Emerita of Political Science at the University of Pittsburgh. ‘But while it’s true that race is fundamentally important to the way people vote, women’s issues are a fascinating area which hasn’t yet received as much attention as it deserves."

For a detailed analysis of the ANES data and what it reveals about most effective campaigning issues for the 2016 presidential election, visit Cogent Social Sciences

NOTE TO JOURNALISTS

When referencing the article: Please include Journal title, author, published by Cogent OA and the following statement:

* Read the full article online: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/23311886.2016.1172936

About Cogent OA

Cogent OA is an open access publisher of scholarly research committed to offering a truly author-centered service. Our aim is to help researchers share their ideas and discoveries as widely and as effectively as possible.

We offer all the traditional services such as thorough peer review and high quality online presentation, but are adding to these new ideas to help ensure our authors' work has maximum global impact.

As part of the Taylor & Francis Group – an Informa business – we are building on solid foundations and maintain the traditional values and high standards of an organization with more than 200 years of experience serving the research community.

For more information, please contact:

Craig Teall, Marketing Executive – Cogent OA
craig.teall@CogentOA.com

www.CogentOA.com

, Oxford.

Study shows benefit of art therapy in reducing psychological problems in Syrian refugee children

Group art therapy shows promise in reducing a wide range of psychological symptoms commonly experienced by refugee children, according to a pilot study of Syrian refugee children living in Turkey, published in the journal Vulnerable Children and Youth Studies.

Numerous studies have shown that refugee children are at high risk of a broad range of psychological problems including depression, behavioural problems, aggression, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). With almost 1.5 million refugee children from Syria currently living in Turkey, effective programmes to improve their mental health are sorely needed.

This study assessed whether group art therapy could reduce psychological symptoms in 64 Syrian refugee children (aged 7–12) who were living in Istanbul. Arabic speaking interviewers used standard questionnaires and scales to assess the children’s traumatic experiences and to measure levels of depression, PTSD, and anxiety—both before and one week after—the five-day art therapy programme. The therapy used the Skills for Psychological Recovery programme to help children improve their problem solving skills, express and manage their feelings, and increase their social engagement and self-esteem through, art, dancing, and music.

At the start of the study, over half the children (35) were deemed at high risk of developing PTSD, around a quarter (14) already had PTSD symptoms, about a fifth (10) showed severe levels of depression and state (current) anxiety symptoms (6), and almost a third (13) had severe levels of trait anxiety symptoms (general tendency to be anxious; table 3).

One week after the programme, children reported significant improvements in trauma, depression, and trait-anxiety symptoms. No significant improvement was noted in state anxiety symptoms (table 4 and figure 1).

This study draws attention to the psychological impact of the refugee crisis on Syrian children and presents a potentially effective therapy. However, the authors caution that because of the limited number of participants and lack of control group, larger studies will be needed before definitive conclusions can be made about the therapy’s effect on reducing psychological symptoms in refugee children.

NOTE TO JOURNALISTS
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* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17450128.2016.1181288

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life. As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information, please contact:
Donna Hutchinson
Marketing Executive, Taylor & Francis Group
Email: donna.hutchinson@tandf.co.uk
Follow us on Twitter @tandfnewsroom

, Philadelphia.

Routledge announces publishing partnership with the Research Council on Mathematics Learning

Taylor & Francis Group and the Research Council on Mathematics Learning (RCML) are pleased to announce a new publishing partnership. Beginning with the 2017 Volume, Taylor & Francis will publish and distribute RCML’s highly regarded journal, Investigations in Mathematics Learning, under the Routledge imprint. In a statement released by the Council this week, RCML stated “it is excited to partner with Taylor & Francis for the publication of our mathematics education research journal, Investigations in Mathematics Learning. As a community that has been publishing research journals since the 1970’s, we look forward to this new era of publication with Taylor & Francis.”

The Research Council on Mathematics Learning is a professional community of researchers interested in mathematics education who value collaboration and interdisciplinary research efforts. A key focus of this research is to understand and/or influence factors that affect mathematics learning. RCML focuses on promoting research-based advancements in PK-20 mathematics learning and PK-16 teacher preparation and professional development. Target audiences include mathematics education faculty, mathematics faculty, and PK-12 school leaders. To learn more about the Council, please visit www.rcml-math.org

Investigations in Mathematics Learning is published four times per year and seeks to stimulate, generate, coordinate, and disseminate research efforts designed to understand and/or influence factors that affect mathematics learning. Manuscripts from an inter-disciplinary perspective are also valued.

NOTE TO JOURNALISTS
When referencing the article: Please include Journal title, author, published by Taylor & Francis and the following statement:

* Read the full article online:http://www.rcml-math.org/investigations

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information, please contact:

Emily Matthias - Senior Marketing Associate, Taylor & Francis Group.
Email: emily.matthias@taylorandfrancis.com
 

, Oxford.

Major review of Zika evidence highlights lack of understanding

A major review of the Zika virus has concluded that further research to understand the nature of the virus is critical to developing antiviral treatments and vaccines.

The paper, published in the journal Veterinary Quarterly, considers the breadth of current research and highlights a lack of understanding of the nature of the virus. The research team, based in India and the USA, concludes that whilst prevention and control measures are mainly aimed at the mosquitoes which spread the disease, further research is required into this relatively new pathogen.

Whilst the Zika virus was first isolated in 1947, it was initially classified as an ‘innocuous’ pathogen. Following the outbreak in Brazil during early 2015, it has spread rapidly across South and Central America, which has led to the World Health Organization declaring in February 2016 that the virus is a ‘Public Health Emergency of International Concern.’ With Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, due to host the summer Olympics later this year, the virus is attracting the concern of participating athletes and visitors alike.

In this paper, the researchers bring together the current evidence and understanding of the Zika virus. They raise concerns that as the vector mainly responsible for spreading the virus, the Aedes genus of mosquito, is also responsible for spreading main other diseases, such as Dengue and Chikungunya, it may not take long for Zika to spread to the remaining parts of the world. Whilst Zika has been shown to be transmitted to babies in the womb, via blood transfusion and through sexual intercourse, the researchers do believe mosquito control should be a priority.

The major areas for research raised in the paper relate to the very nature of the virus itself. The authors highlight the lack of genetic understanding of the virus; in particular what mutation has caused the virus to become so virulent. They also suggest that understanding the interactions between the virus and humans is key, particularly to develop a test that allows for the virus to be quickly identified from other similar viruses.

Whilst the questions are often easy to ask, finding the solutions is not always straightforward. However, the researchers believe that microscopy revealing the structure of the mature virus, and increased sharing of data between researchers and countries would prove good starting points.

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* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/01652176.2016.1188333

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information, please contact:

Caroline Blake, Taylor & Francis Group

Email: caroline.blake@tandf.co.uk

Follow us on Twitter @tandfnewsroom

, Philadelphia.

Invasive Asian Carp respond strongly to carbon dioxide

Adding carbon dioxide gas (CO2) to water, a process similar to making carbonated soda water, could help control the movement and behavior of invasive carp in the Great Lakes basin, according to a recent study in Transactions of the American Fisheries Society.

Bighead Carp Hypophthalmichthys nobilis and Silver Carp H. molitrix are species of invasive Asian carp that threaten the Great Lakes. Scientists with the University of Illinois and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) tested the effectiveness of infusing water with recycled CO2 gas to discourage the movement of Bighead and Silver carp. Both carp species avoided CO2-infused water in a research pond at the USGS Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center in La Crosse, Wisconsin.

“These fish responses provide evidence that CO2 could be used as a tool to deter the movement of Bighead and Silver carp,” said Michael Donaldson, a University of Illinois researcher and the study’s lead author. “The results are encouraging because there is a need for additional methods to prevent the entry of Asian carp into the Great Lakes.”

The scientists gradually added light plumes of CO2 gas throughout the USGS test pond. They monitored the behavior of individual Bighead and Silver carp, as well as the behavior of native fish species such as Bigmouth Buffalo Ictiobus cyprinellus, Channel Catfish Ictalurus punctatus, Paddlefish Polyodon spathula, and Yellow Perch Perca flavescens, before, during, and after the addition of CO2. The scientists found that:

  • Each fish species except for Paddlefish avoided the areas of the pond with CO2-infused water;
  • Certain Bighead and Silver carp movements slowed down immediately after CO2 was injected; and
  • Bighead Carp used a smaller area of the pond furthest from the injection sites immediately after CO2 was added.

“Further tests are needed before CO2 can be used in Asian carp management,” said Jon Amberg, a USGS scientist and coauthor of the study. “Understanding the effects of long-term, elevated CO2 exposure on fish and other organisms can help assess its risks to native organisms.”

The next research step is to test the usefulness of CO2 gas in controlling Bigheaded Carp movement in a natural river.

Nonnative Asian carp can damage ecosystems in the Great Lakes basin by competing with native fish and mussels for food. Large Silver Carp are also hazardous to boaters because they can leap up to 10 feet out of the water when startled.

For more information about Asian carp research, please visit the University of Illinois, USGS UMESC, and asiancarp.us websites.

NOTE TO JOURNALISTS
When referencing the article: Please include Journal title, author, published by Taylor & Francis and the following statement:

* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00028487.2016.1143397

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.   From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information please contact: 
Jillian O’Hara – Science and Technology Journals Marketing Assistant
e-mail: jillian.ohara@taylorandfrancis.com

Follow us on Twitter @tandfnewsroom

, Oxford.

Coat Color and Aggressive Behaviors in Domestic Cats

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information, please contact:

Ben Hudson, Taylor & Francis Group

Email: Benjamin.Hudson@tandf.co.uk

Follow us on Twitter @tandfnewsroom

, Oxford.

Postgraduate Medicine launches to an additional 50,000 physicians

This summer, over 50,000 practicing physicians within Internal Medicine and Family Practice in the US will receive a free, indefinite print subscription to Postgraduate Medicine, the international peer-reviewed medical journal for primary care physicians. The additional controlled circulation is part of the journal’s relaunch to celebrate the 70th anniversary of its first official publication, which was established by Charles Mayo.

This relaunch means that upon publication of each issue, over 50,000 targeted physicians across the nation will get free relevant, useful, and authoritative medical information to help keep up-to-date with continuing education, guide clinical decision making and improve patient care. Those publishing their work in Postgraduate Medicine will reap the benefits of increased visibility and high impact that come from reaching this primary care audience directly.

In addition to this guaranteed exposure, Postgraduate Medicine also offers rapid publication options that can publish articles, fully peer-reviewed, within 3-5 weeks from first submission:

  • Fast Track offers a submission to online publication timeline of 3–5 weeks.
  • Rapid Track offers a submission to online publication timeline of 7–9 weeks.

To view Postgraduate Medicine’s latest published content, free-to-access articles, calls for papers and aims and scope, go to the journal homepage at http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/ipgm.

Postgraduate Medicine features semi-themed issues that each have a specific clinical focus. For a full list of Postgraduate Medicine’s upcoming themes in 2017 and the deadlines for submitting manuscripts to these issues, go to http://explore.tandfonline.com/cfp/med/pgm-cfp.

Postgraduate Medicine accepts manuscript submissions via its online portal at https://mc04.manuscriptcentral.com/pgm.

Have any questions or would like to discuss a potential submission? Contact the Managing Editor, Jonathan Patience, at jonathan.patience@informa.com.


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-----------------------------------------
About Taylor & Francis Group
-----------------------------------------

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Cape Town, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues. 

For more information please contact:
Jonathan Patience, Managing Editor, Postgraduate Medicine, Taylor & Francis
email: jonathan.patience@informa.com

, Oxford.

Taylor & Francis and the Mycological Society of America launch a new publishing partnership

Taylor & Francis Group and the Mycological Society of America are pleased to announce a new publishing partnership for the journal, Mycologia.

Mycologia, the official journal of the Society, publishes papers on all aspects of mycology, including physiology and biochemistry, ecology, pathology, development and morphology, systematics, cell biology and ultrastructure, genetics, molecular biology, and evolution.

Anthony Trioli, Editorial Director, US Science & Technology, said, “Taylor & Francis is proud and honored to be entering a publishing partnership with the Mycological Society of America (MSA) on the publication of their journal, Mycologia for 2017. We look forward to working closely with the MSA and increasing the visibility of Mycologia through our online platform Taylor & Francis Online to the widest global audience.” 

MSA President Kerry O’Donnell added, “Speaking on behalf of the Executive Council and Editors, we are excited about the move to Taylor & Francis to publish Mycologia, starting in January 2017.”

To find out more about the Mycological Society of America, visit their website.

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life. As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information please contact:

Deirdre Kilbride
Marketing Executive, Taylor and Francis Journals
Email: Deirdre.Kilbride@tandf.co.uk
Visit our newsroom at: http://newsroom.taylorandfrancisgroup.com/
Follow us on Twitter @tandfnewsroom

, Oxford.

Palaeontologists’ research on nine massive neck vertebrae sheds new light on the giant cretaceous dinosaur alamosaurus sanjuanensis

The discovery nearly two decades ago of nine beautifully articulated vertebrae at Big Bend National Park is revealing more about a 66 million-year-old sauropod native to Texas and the North American southwest called Alamosaurus sanjuanensis.

Palaeontologists from the Perot Museum of Nature and Science in Dallas have co-authored an open access scientific paper entitled 'An articulated cervical series of Alamosaurus sanjuanensis Gilmore, 1922 (Dinosauria, Sauropoda) from Texas: new perspective on the relationships of North America's last giant sauropod' in the Journal of Systematic Palaeontology.

“Giant sauropods like Alamosaurus have amazed people since the 1800s. Their sheer size boggles the mind and they have forced scientists to re-think the physical limits of land-living animals,” said co-author, Ronald S. Tykoski. “The fossils described in our paper reveal new details about the last sauropods in North America, which helps us better understand who Alamosaurus was related to and how this species made it to southern North America just in time to go extinct at the end of the Cretaceous!”

The name Alamosaurus came from the Ojo Alamo trading post and geological formation in New Mexico from which the first bones of the species were found. The name of the trading post stemmed from the Spanish word for a huge cottonwood tree growing at the trading post. Alamosaurus was a titanosaur sauropod, one of the groups of long-necked and long-tailed dinosaurs that included the largest animals to walk the Earth.

The discovery of the massive bones came in 1997, when a joint field crew from the University of Texas at Dallas (UT-D) and the Perot Museum (known at that time as the Dallas Museum of Natural History) was working in the northeast section of Big Bend National Park. The scientists and volunteers were excavating a site that produced parts of several immature sauropods when Dana Biasatti, then a student at UT-D, “stretched her legs” and came upon the remarkable remains of an adult titanosaur a few hundred yards away. The nine cervical (neck) vertebrae were the first articulated series of adult Alamosaurus neck bones ever found. The fossils of Alamosaurus from Big Bend National Park currently represent the biggest dinosaurs discovered in Texas.

“The part of the animal that was exposed at the surface was the hip region. Probing around the site resulted in the discovery of this incredible neck,” said co-author, Anthony R. Fiorillo. “One of the intriguing aspects of this project is that for us to better understand this dinosaur in our home state, we had to also rely, in part, on the results of the scientific work the Perot Museum has been doing in Arctic Alaska over the same window of time.”

Today, visitors can view the actual fossilized neck bones from Big Bend at the Perot Museum of Nature and Science. Laser digitization and 3D printing were used to create lightweight replicas of the dinosaur’s neck, along with portions of the body obtained from another skeleton at the University of Texas at Austin, and tail and leg bones in the collections of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. It remains the only rendition of a complete Alamosaurus skeleton on exhibit anywhere in the world.

NOTE TO JOURNALISTS
When referencing the article: Please include Journal title, author, published by Taylor & Francis and the following statement:

* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/14772019.2016.1183150

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information, please contact:
Andy Hall, Marketing Manager
Taylor & Francis Journals
Email: Andy.Hall@tandf.co.uk