Taylor & Francis Newsroom

, Oxford.

Tweeting your weight loss: is there a link between microblogging and eating disorders?

In a new open access article for Cogent Social Sciences, researchers from Georgia College & State University and Chapman University explore the relationship between social media, eating disorders, and compulsive exercise.

Social media is saturated with messages encouraging people to eat healthily and take plenty of exercise, but these messages can exacerbate the effects of an eating disorder. The study set out to examine different types of online communities and activities, including blogging, microblogging and using mobile apps to monitor diet and exercise.

"Plenty of previous work has documented the ways in which young people can be particularly vulnerable to the effects of media use in this area of body image," said Veronica Hefner, Georgia College & State University, one of the authors of the paper. "But it seems from our study that 'fitspiration' content is specifically related to risky behaviors like compulsive exercise and eating disorder symptoms, especially among those young people who use mobile apps on a frequent basis."

Of interest to researchers, parents, educators, and practitioners, the full study is freely available to read in Cogent Social Sciences.

NOTE TO JOURNALISTS

When referencing the article: Please include Journal title, author, published by Cogent OA and the following statement:

* Read the full article online: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/23311886.2016.1176304

About Cogent OA

Cogent OA is an Open Access publisher of scholarly research committed to offering a truly author-centered service. Our aim is to help researchers share their ideas and discoveries as widely and as effectively as possible.

We offer all the traditional services such as thorough peer review and high quality online presentation, but are adding to these new ideas to help ensure our authors' work has maximum global impact.

As part of Taylor & Francis Group – an Informa business – we are building on solid foundations and maintain the traditional values and high standards of an organization with more than 200 years of experience serving the research community.

For more information, please contact:

Zita Balogh, Head of Marketing – Cogent OA
zita.balogh@CogentOA.com

www.CogentOA.com

, Oxford.

Race and the politics of environmental inequality

How does race come into the equation when siting environmentally hazardous facilities? Much evidence exists to indicate that minority and poor communities bear a disproportionate burden of environmental hazards.

New research by Christopher Mele, published in Environmental Sociology, examines the decision-making process behind the siting of several hazardous facilities within Chester, Pennsylvania in the late 1980s. Chester is notable as a landmark case of environmental inequality due to the large scale siting and construction of hazardous facilities in the city from 1984 to 1996.

The study analyses data ranging from US census reports and first-hand eyewitness testimonies, to local newspaper articles and published minutes from government agency meetings. Mele cites evidence documented in court briefs produced in the landmark legal battle over the cluster construction of waste facilities in Chester.

The study concludes that race was a key factor in the decision-making process behind siting of extensive hazardous facilities at Chester: “The case of Chester reveals how race discourses were formative in a local politics that seemingly pitted the city’s economic development against the county’s solution to its waste disposal problems… [and] issues of race were called upon by political leaders to facilitate popular support among their constituencies.”

Mele suggests the results from the Chester study may not, however, have the potential to be generalised to other urban examples of environmental inequality. He concludes “Because the dynamics of local politics are characteristically unique and not prone to generalization, the analysis of race and facility siting in Chester may not apply to other urban contexts and other environmental issues.”

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* Read the full article online:http://tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/23251042.2016.1163962

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information, please contact:
Imogen Catling
Marketing Executive, Taylor & Francis Sociology & Law Journals 
Email: imogen.catling@tandf.co.uk

, Oxford.

Fatigue and fracture of wires and cables for biomedical applications

Gbur and Lewandowski, of Case Western Reserve University, have published an extensive review of the fatigue and fracture behavior of wire-based systems used in biomedical applications in International Materials Reviews.

The drive towards minimally invasive surgeries, along with emerging applications in the neurostimulation market and neuroprosthetic technologies, requires materials and architectures with a high level of reliability. Fine wires, strands, cables and coils comprise a variety of implantable devices and tools that play a critical role in the treatment of a large array of medical diagnoses.

For the first time, this comprehensive article offers a discussion and summary of the common materials systems, testing methodologies, fatigue data, modeling and fracture characteristics. This research compiles and plots legacy data in order to allow readers a more convenient method of comparison and to illustrate the variability residing in published works conducted using different testing techniques. The effects of changes in material composition, processing and test conditions on the fatigue and fracture behavior are discussed and recommendations for future work are also provided.

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* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/09506608.2016.1152347

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life. As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information, please contact:

Lauren Harvey, Taylor & Francis Group, Marketing Executive
Email: lauren.harvey@tandf.co.uk
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, Oxford.

Could wearable technology impact our healthcare, fashion, and even sport?

With the rapid proliferation of smart mobile devices, and the subsequent increase in data that is being gathered, the challenge is: how do we harness it?

In this latest research from The Journal of The Textile Institute, Park and Jayaraman explore the impact of modern day wearable technology on data gathering in the 21st Century.

A critical need for the proliferation of wearables for personalized mobile information processing is that they should not impose any additional social, psychological, or ergonomic burden on the individual, and this research suggests that the answer could lie in the clothes we wear, enhanced with technology. In today’s harried world, an individual could well leave a personal electronic device behind one day (say, a smartphone), but is unlikely to walk out of the house without clothes.

Consider the impact could this have on our healthcare system. An individual typically receives four types of care; ambulatory, preventative, chronic, and acute. The data from these four points of care are distinct and fragmented, but wearable technology could be the solution.

Imagine the future: What if a driver’s racing suit captured biometrics such as heart rate, electrocardiogram, body temperature, water loss, and calories burned, enabling them to display this information to their pit crew? And how about if a spectator could physically “experience” the G forces acting on the driver during the race with varying degrees of compression on their body?

Wearable technology, with its integrated sensors and devices, can make this possible, and this latest research gives an in-depth explanation of exactly how and why.

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NOTE TO JOURNALISTS
When referencing the article: Please include Journal title, author, published by Taylor & Francis and the following statement:

* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/00405000.2016.1176632

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life. As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

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Lauren Harvey, Taylor & Francis Group, Marketing Executive
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Follow us on Twitter @tandfnewsroom

, Oxford.

What makes a house a home?

At the least a house gives shelter and protection from the elements. At best it is a personal haven for comfort, security and a place to call ‘home’. Exactly how does a house become a home? Rosie Cox’s study in Home Cultures explores property owners’ notions of ‘home’ and their home making journeys and argues that sometimes what is ‘homey’ about a home is its very lack of robustness.

We tend to assume that most people wish for low-maintenance, well insulated robust houses offering reliable protection from the weather, dirt and noise of the outside world. Most of us strive to keep our houses well maintained, to our own taste and reflecting our own style via DIY. Could the DIY process represent more than just upkeep? 

Cox interviewed 30 homeowners from New Zealand about their home improvements: were they DIY or paid for? She explored what motivated their home renovations and the division of labour. Surprisingly, most did not want a perfectly fortress like house but preferred to put their own stamp on it through self-improvements and felt they did not truly ‘own’ it until they had. 

The bond between house and owner was also found to be linked to the fabric of the house, many expressing a preference for more malleable materials such as wood over concrete or steel. A historical dearth of stone dictated many wood constructed houses, which has continued to the present day. One homeowner considered his wood front door ‘a special part of the home’. Despite the extra maintenance it needed, it was warmer and more welcoming than an aluminium or uPVC one and gave great satisfaction to work on it, preserve it, be proud of it and call it home. 

For many New Zealanders, DIY not only harked back to the home building crafts of early settlers but also evoked emotional responses such as cementing family relationships and establishing social identities as well as creating a home. Cox concludes, “This article has illustrated one of the reasons why people may opt for homes that are made of familiar and traditional materials and… has shown how strong their motivations are to do so.… (It) expands the concept of homeyness and invites new ways to think about the relationships between home, housing materials and the identities of home owners.”

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* Read the full article online:http://tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17406315.2016.1122966

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life. As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, e-books and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.  From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information please contact:
Steven Turner, Marketing Coordinator
Journals Marketing
email: steven.turner@tandf.co.uk

, Oxford.

YBP Library Services partners with Taylor & Francis to offer e-book titles through GOBI

50,000 e-book titles from Routledge are added to the Humanities and Social Science e-books available in GOBI

E-books from the Taylor & Francis e-books platform are now available through the GOBI acquisition platform from YBP Library Services (YBP). This helps to simplify the complex process of discovery, acquisition model and content management that libraries have to manage when purchasing books.

As a result of the partnership, libraries can efficiently and conveniently use GOBI to select more than 50,000 e-book titles from Routledge, an imprint of Taylor & Francis and the world’s leading academic publisher in the Humanities and Social Science. Like all titles that are available from the Taylor & Francis e-books platform, the Routledge e-book titles are available DRM-free.

GOBI provides access to more than 13 million titles, including more than one million e-books from leading publishers and aggregators, all in one place. GOBI users benefit from duplication control across all formats, full-text reviews and refined selection lists, real-time management reports and more. With the addition of Routledge e-book titles, nearly every major publisher platform is now available in GOBI and can be fully integrated with each other and YBP services. Titles from Routledge, Oxford and its UPSO partners, Cambridge, SAGE Knowledge, De Gruyter and its partners, Project Muse and JSTOR can now be filtered through a single point of delivery and service.
Senior Vice President Mark Kendall says that through GOBI’s sophisticated search and discovery functionality, e-books related to the Humanities and Social Science have never been so easy to manage: “YBP is committed to supporting libraries and the needs of the scholars, instructors and professional communities that use Routledge e-books while employing workflows that save time and money.”

T&F’s US & Canada Library Sales Director Evelyn Elias says, “We are pleased to offer more than 50,000 Routledge e-books - including titles from imprints such as Focal Press, Ashgate and Psychology Press - on YBP’s popular GOBI platform, which is an important step toward streamlining the ordering process and improving workflows for our library customers.”

For more information visit: http://www.tandfebooks.com and http://www.ybp.com

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life. As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information please contact:
Rachel Kemp, Senior Marketing Manager, Taylor & Francis
Email: rachel.kemp@tandf.co.uk

, Oxford.

Ketamine found more effective for treating highly-agitated patients during transport to hospital

Scientists have shown that ketamine is far more effective than the more commonly used haloperidol for treating highly-agitated patients prior to hospitalisation. Patients were sedated in five minutes on average when treated with ketamine – 12 minutes faster than the average sedation time using haloperidol. The increased efficacy in sedation does come with a trade-off; the rate of complications and need for intubation both increase markedly for patients treated with ketamine.

These findings, publishing in the journal Clinical Toxicology, are the result of research performed over two six-month periods by clinicians based in Minneapolis. During these time periods, paramedics trained to evaluate a patient’s mental status against the Altered Medical Status Scale (AMSS) recorded the findings from 146 patients, 64 who were administered ketamine and 82 who were given haloperidol. Their findings indicated that ketamine is a more effective sedative, and whilst there is a trade-off in terms of complications, it warrants further study.

Paramedics often find that patients they are about to treat can become confused, agitated or combative prior to being taken to the hospital. Often this can put both the patient and paramedic at risk, and so the patient will be sedated during their trip to the hospital in an ambulance. At present, there is some debate on the best drugs and doses for this therapy.

The AMSS rates a patient’s mental status on a scale ranging from +4 (combative, very violent, or out of control), through 0 (normal response), to -4 (does not respond to mild prodding or shaking). Patients judged to be agitated were administered with either 5 mg/kg of ketamine, or 10 mg of haloperidol and timed until they returned to a state of less than +1 on the scale. Pregnant women, people under 18, and severely agitated patients (+4 on the scale) were excluded from the study.

The researchers found that the median time for a patient to be sedated using ketamine was 5 minutes, compared to 17 minutes for patients treated with haloperidol. However, the researchers also noted a marked increase in complications; 49 % for the group treated with ketamine, compared to 5 % for the group treated with haloperidol.  Furthermore, 39 % of the ketamine group required intubation compared to 4 % of the group treated with haloperidol.

The paper recognizes that the study is a preliminary finding, and that there were potential confounders such as the study being neither randomized or blind. However, the researchers believe that the findings warrant further study of the drugs used to sedate patients in the pre-hospital environment.

You can also read a commentary which is linked to this article for free: http://tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/15563650.2016.1180391

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* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/15563650.2016.1177652

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine. From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information please contact:
Elaine Roberts, Senior Marketing Executive
Taylor & Francis Journals
Email: elaine.roberts@tandf.co.uk

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, Oxford.

Confidence – how has it achieved ‘cult’ status in the 21st century?

How has the notion of ‘confidence’ infiltrated consumer body culture and discussions about gender and work? Authors Rosalind Gill and Shani Orgad, writing in Australian Feminist Studies, pitch the idea that there is a new "cult(ure) of confidence" in contemporary society, in which almost whatever the question, the solution posed will be ‘improve women’s confidence.’ The study questions, ‘What is the confidence cult, and why has it achieved such affective force in the early twenty-first century?’

Authors Rosalind Gill and Shani Orgad argue that "to be self-confident is the new imperative of our time." Their argument is that the cult(ure) of confidence in society has become a technology of self, which calls on us to ‘act upon ourselves.’ What make this distinctive is its gendered address to girls and women, and its apparent embrace of feminist language and goals.

The authors analyse two broad areas of social life in which the notion of confidence has taken hold in the last few years: in the workplace and in consumer body culture. They show that there has been a turning away from structural or cultural understandings of gender inequality, to be replaced by a focus on building up women’s self-confidence. Advocates of the "confidence cult(ure)" such as Facebook’s Sheryl Sandberg, and the "body love" advertising of Dove and Weightwatchers, incite women to believe in themselves and feel comfortable in their own skins, but in doing so they implicitly place the blame and responsibility in women themselves. The solution advocated is an individualistic and psychological one - to work on developing self esteem, rather than changing an unfair world.

Gill and Orgad conclude that "confidence as a technology of the self is a response to and a product of earlier feminist critiques of neoliberal culture," particularly within the beauty industry. They also conclude that there "…is new spirit, embodied by the confidence cult(ure), incites women to makeover their psychic lives, and in doing so makes over feminism itself—into a neoliberal feminism that is complicit with rather than critical of patriarchal capitalism."

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* Read the full article online:http://tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/08164649.2016.1148001

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information, please contact:
Imogen Catling
Marketing Executive, Taylor & Francis Sociology & Law Journals 
Email: imogen.catling@tandf.co.uk

, Oxford.

Journalism changed forever by User-Generated Content

The rise of User-Generated Content (UGC) – information submitted by members of the public or posted on social media – has changed journalism forever, according to a new study in Digital Journalism.

As Lisette Johnston from City University, London, explains: “As more news organisations move towards becoming ‘digital first’, the skills journalists are expected to possess have changed. They must become more “tech-savvy” … In turn, the role of the journalist itself is being redefined, as are the skills needed by newsroom staff.”

To understand the evolution of journalism in the age of social media, Johnston studied how journalists from BBC World News integrated UGC into their reports on the conflict in Syria. She studied hours of video as well as interviewed reporters and newsroom staff.

As expected, UGC formed a large part of the material she studied. More than half the 35 reports or ‘news packages’ on Syria she analysed opened with a UGC clip. She also found that the amount of UGC integrated by BBC journalists increased as the conflict wore on and reporters found access to the country more challenging. Peak USG usage also coincided with large-scale protests and violence.

But the increasing amount of UGC used by BBC journalists was only part of the story. The journalists to whom Johnson spoke said they felt ‘they had to harness a variety of new skills to enable them to “harvest” content uploaded to digital platforms’. They also found themselves actively engaged in “social media newsgathering” – for images, contacts and eyewitnesses – across multiple platforms, a practice encouraged by their managers.

Johnston’s contacts also admitted that it took time to become ‘social news savvy’ and develop a ‘more forensic’ approach to their work. Shifting through the immense volume of UGC posted online posed a huge challenge, as did verifying what was chosen – a task made even more difficult in a war zone, where contacting the uploader of the footage could put his or her life at risk. Journalists had to become ‘detective-like’ when verifying footage found online; but even if they weren’t responsible for the actual verification themselves, they had to learn how to use UGC appropriately in terms of attribution, labelling and caveats.

As for the future, Johnston concludes that ‘being capable of processing UGC and being able to navigate social media platforms which audiences inhabit are becoming core skills which journalists need to possess and maintain’.

In other words, in a ‘social’ world, journalists must now adapt to not being the only ones telling the story.

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* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/21670811.2016.1168709

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.   From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.  For more information please contact:

Marita Eleftheriadou, Marketing Executive, Journals

email: Marita.Eleftheriadou@tandf.co.uk

, Oxford.

Heating chemotherapy drugs may improve bladder cancer treatment

Scientists have found that heating the chemotherapy drug mitomycin-C prior to using it for treating bladder cancer may radically improve its efficacy. The findings, published in the International Journal of Hyperthermia, are the result of a four and a half year study by medics based at Comarcal Hospital, Monforte, Spain.

The ‘Recirculant hyperthermic IntraVEsical chemotherapy (HIVEC™)' treatment devised by the researchers involved heating a solution of mitomycin-C and diluted water to a target temperature of 43°C prior to delivery into the bladder. The drugs were recirculated at 200 mL per minute at a stable pressure, and the temperature inside the bladder was maintained for 60 minutes.

40 patients took part in the study, split into two groups – one which received the HIVEC™ treatment prior to a resection of the bladder, and another which received HIVEC™ after resection of the bladder.

97% of the patients were able to complete the full course of HIVEC™ treatments, and the majority of participants responded well to the treatment and show low rates of recurrence. Furthermore, the majority of the side-effects were low grade and had very little effect on the treatment plan.

The majority of bladder cancers can be treated by endoscopic surgical removal or ablation of the tumour tissue. However, some patients require further treatment, which involves circulating drugs around the bladder. When this fails, few options exist but to remove the bladder – a highly morbid and invasive procedure.

Commonly Bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG) is used as the most effective treatment for non-muscle invasive bladder cancer. Mitomycin-C is typically less effective than BCG, but the authors believe that heating the solution increases the efficacy of the drug in part due to the increased solubility at higher temperature, and in part due to the increased permeability of the bladder lining.

The researchers also modelled the cost savings per patient of the HIVEC™ treatment, and estimate it to be €687 after three years.

Surprisingly, they even treated some patients with HIVEC™ instead of the standard endoscopic surgery and found that in the majority of patients the tumors completely disappeared and did not come back within their brief follow-up of a few years. This suggests that HIVEC™ might be a less invasive alternative to surgery in some patients, an exciting finding which if confirmed by others, will be game changing.

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* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.3109/02656736.2016.1142618

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine. From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information please contact:
Elaine Roberts, Senior Marketing Executive
Taylor & Francis Journals
Email: elaine.roberts@tandf.co.uk

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