Taylor & Francis Newsroom

, Oxford.

Virginity testing in South Africa: should it be banned?

The late 1980’s saw the revival of virginity testing in rural KwaZulu-Natal. Legally, virginity testing can be carried out on boys and girls between the ages of 16-18 years. But is the practice a relevant part of African cultural heritage, or a discriminatory infringement of human rights? A new article in the South African Journal of Philosophy explores answers to this question.

The test on girls, designed to affirm virginal status, is based on whether the hyman is intact. The test is therefore far from 100% reliable; some women are born without a hymen, the hymen can be broken by tampons or sporting activities, and conversely, the hymen does not always rupture after one act of coitus. However, the results can have profound effects for the girl.

Test results are only divulged with personal permission, but refusal to tell is tantamount to guilt, so in reality, privacy is not an option. 

A ‘non-virgin’ verdict can result in awful consequences, ranging from honour killing, abuse, isolation, financial penalty, family shame, and poor marriage prospects. Surely, such an inaccurate test should not have the power to affect the course of a young girl’s life? 

A confirmation of virginal status can have equally damaging outcomes; rape by HIV infected men who believe sex with a virgin will cure them, or by people jealous of her pristine status. 

With such terrible consequences, this test needs careful reconsideration about its ethical status.

The law permits tests on both boys and girls, but in practice is only performed on girls. The markers for establishing a boy’s virginity are incredibly tenuous and there is no evidence of widespread testing on boys. The inclusion of boys is seemingly to establish an illusion of equality. 

The widespread testing of girls indicates a belief that girls bear disproportionate responsibility for sexual activity and are ‘seducers of men’. The author notes:re-institution of virginity testing is intended to encourage young women to embrace a role for themselves as subservient, respectful and obedient. This can only serve to perpetuate patriarchy and the dominance of women by men”. 

Such disempowerment can leave women and girls vulnerable to violence, abuse, and rape. In theory girls are free to choose to participate in a test, but in practice coercion is often the order of the day.

Proponents of the practice refute the notion that it's an infringement of dignity and privacy. In the face of past oppression and attacks on customs, traditionalists emphasise its importance in African cultural values with the prized title of "virgin" overriding any fears of bodily invasion. 

However, the author argues that no practice should be sanctioned solely on the basis of culture. He joins the heavyweight detractors; the ANC, International Human Rights Commission, and Gender Commission, in condemning virginity testing as an unjust, discriminatory practice, and urges a complete ban on all virginity testing.

NOTE TO JOURNALISTS
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* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02580136.2014.912471

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information please contact:
Andrea Wells, Senior Marketing Executive, Arts & Humanities Journals
email: andrea.wells@tandf.co.uk

, Oxford.

Does food advertising make us eat more?

On a daily basis we are surrounded with images of appetizing and often unhealthy food on TV adverts, billboards, in magazines and everywhere we go. With obesity on the rise, this article in Psychology & Health raises questions about constant exposure to food cues and its effect on eating habits. Does it encourage over-indulgence? Are overweight people more vulnerable? The research examines our cognitive processes, our motivators to eat, and the practical implications for the management of dysfunctional eating behaviours.

Two experiments were conducted, the first on a female group with average BMI. The group was split, the first half watched a mixture of food and non-food related advertising and a control group watched only non-food related ads. The groups were then asked to complete a list of unfinished words, all of which had the potential to be food related, and to record their level of desire to eat. The second experiment followed the same methodology, but participants had high BMI. 

In both experiments, those shown food ads produced more food related words, suggesting that the advertising does activate increased food-related cognitions.

Interestingly, experiment 2 showed that overweight viewers of food ads reported stronger desire to eat than those in their control group. Experiment 1 participants reported low desire to eat across the board. The overweight group appeared more prone to eat as a direct result of TV ads.  

The authors urge for more research using this information to help dysfunctional eaters by training them to avoid food in response to food cues.

NOTE TO JOURNALISTS
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* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/08870446.2014.918267

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life. As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information please contact: Caroline Blake, Marketing Executive, Behavioral Science, Health and Social Care Journals email: caroline.blake@tandf.co.uk

, Oxford.

Sun beds are out. Eating your five-a-day is the key to a sexy sun-kissed glow.

Forget sun beds, sunbathing and fake tanning lotions. The secret to a sexy, healthy glow lies in eating your five-a-day, reveals new breakthrough research from Taylor & Francis.

A new and innovative study recently published in The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology sheds new light on the importance of skin colour as a determiner of facial attractiveness. It also shows that carotenoid coloration has the upper hand over melanisation when it comes to the rules of attraction.

"Skin coloration can arise as a result of two distinct processes", explain the team leading the research: through tanning (melanisation) or the assimilation of fruit and vegetables (carotenoid ingestion). 

While it is known that red and yellow pigments found in bright fruit and vegetables increase skin yellowness, recent studies have shown that "carotenoid coloration is a more important factor in healthy appearance than melanin coloration", clarify the academics.

Determined to investigate the importance of skin colour in judgements of facial attractiveness, as well as mate choices, in three separate, yet linked, Internet-based studies, the team set out to examine the importance of high levels of these pigments (carotenoids and melanin) in attraction choices.

Establishing the preference for one pigment over the other in judging the appeal of a face was also crucial to the research.

In the first two studies, two separate groups of 60 participants were shown 27 base faces, specifically created for the purpose of testing. Through colour manipulation, the skin area of these composite faces was altered alongside the axis of carotenoid or melanin-associated derma colours.

High and low pigment versions of each face were shown in pairs to the partakers, who had to indicate which one they thought more attractive. Results from both studies showed a clear preference for strong colour values; 86% of the attendants to the first study voted for the high carotenoid version, while 78.5% of the participants to the second one opted for the high melanin variant.

But that was not all: in a third and final study, the team pitched 24 high carotenoid and high melanin faces against each other, asking attendants to choose the one deemed more appealing; results showed a 75.9% preference for carotenoid colouring over the melanin one.

This interesting research breaks new ground as it is the first  to show strong evidence for the importance of skin coloration in attractiveness judgements. What’s more, it clearly exposes "the importance of carotenoid coloration as a cue to current health and attractiveness, [a fact that] may be pivotal in mate choices", explain the team.

So, if eating too many carrots has worried you so far, it’s time to think again. Turning orange may not be that bad, after all. 

NOTE TO JOURNALISTS
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* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17470218.2014.944194

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life. As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, e-books and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine. 

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues. 

For more information please contact: 
Claire Thomas, Senior Marketing Executive, Behavioral Science Journals 
email: claire.thomas@tandf.co.uk

, Oxford.

Sweet dreams? Client and therapist dreams of each other during psychodynamic psychotherapy

During this study in Psychotherapy Research, the authors set out to interpret the content and consequences of client’s dreams about their therapists and vice versa. The analysis reveals some fascinating insights into client and therapist personalities, therapeutic relationships, and the psychotherapy process.

The study took 63 adults from a psychology department clinic at a large public US university. Each client had 20 plus sessions, each with one of 13 doctoral students, over a 2 year period. Clients, typically experiencing interpersonal problems, were videotaped during their 45-60 minute consultations and asked to report on dreams about their terapists at the end of the treatment.

Only 2 clients reported dreams about therapists, however clients did not keep dream journals  and were not prompted to talk about their dreams during sessions. At the end, dreams may have faded from memory and perhaps clients were so focussed on their own problems that the therapists did not enter their thoughts outside of therapy. 

Therapists, on the other hand, spend a lot of time evaluating clients in order to help them.

Therapists recorded dream journals during the study and were interviewed by co-authors on salient dreams about clients. Quantitative and qualitative analysis of dreams revealed 9 therapists dreamt about 19 clients. 

Some of the dreams depicted helpless clients, some unusual situations with clients, client aggression, and ethical dilemmas with a client. The feelings represented in the dreams included fear, embarrassment, and guilt; largely negative emotions. 

Therapists reported that the dreams reflected a lack of connectivity with clients, difficulty with a client, or personal issues in their own lives, which all seemed to trigger the dream; “the dreams depicted the struggles of the therapy, whether with the client, with the therapy overall, or with their own developmental challenges as new therapists”. 

Despite this, therapists were able to use the insights helpfully to understand more about themselves and to further develop their ongoing clinical work.

The authors urge supervisors of trainee therapists to actively encourage discussion about client dreams to foster even greater understanding.

NOTE TO JOURNALISTS
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* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/10503307.2013.867461

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life. As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, e-books and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine. 

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues. 

For more information please contact: 
Claire Thomas, Senior Marketing Executive, Behavioral Science Journals 
email: claire.thomas@tandf.co.uk

, Oxford.

Getting justice for victims of revenge porn

An academic has called for an amendment to a major US law to help victims of revenge porn: the online posting of nude or sexually explicit photographs or videos of a former lover without his or her consent.

Writing in the journal Information and Communications Technology Law, Allison Tungate of the University of Missouri-Columbia School of Law explains how unintended consequences of Section 230 of the Communication Decency Act make it nearly impossible for victims of revenge porn to get what they want most: the offending images removed from public view.

The Act provides blanket immunity for website operators and Internet Service Providers that feature user-generated content. Thus even if victims make operators and ISPs aware of the “involuntary pornography” posted on their sites, no duty exists for them to remove it.

Because the law effectively makes only the posters of offensive content culpable, Tungate notes that “victims of revenge porn are faced with mountainous hurdles in order to seek any form of justice”, including pursuing actions for invasion of privacy, breach of copyright, or even the breaking of “implied or express contracts of confidentiality”. Robust new criminal laws in New Jersey, California, and New York target those who post such images, but still cannot oblige ISPs to act.

Tungate does not argue that Section 230 is itself a bad law (“Without Section 230 immunity, sites like YouTube and Reddit, which largely consist of user-generated content, would cease to exist”), but that it must be modified.

“Because of the growing pervasiveness of revenge porn,” she concludes, “lawmakers have an obligation to amend Section 230 of the CDA to protect victims and mitigate the harms stemming from the public disclosure of such private information.”

Tungate outlines her proposed amendment, which would include a firm definition of what constitutes revenge porn and obligatory “takedown” procedures once notice is given to ISPs. She also counters potential objections, including those pertaining to freedom of speech: “Revenge porn, because of its harmful and detrimental effects on society, is well outside the protections of the First Amendment.”

“The line between our Internet activities and real world activities is growing thinner as technology progresses,” she writes. “Thus, there is an increasing need of laws that will protect both our ‘online’ lives and ‘real world’ lives.” Most victims of revenge porn would certainly agree.

NOTE TO JOURNALISTS
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* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13600834.2014.916936#.U_xRnGcXVI1

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.   From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information please contact:
Mel Phillips, Marketing Coordinator
Taylor & Francis Journals
Email: melissa.phillips@tandf.co.uk

, Philadelphia.

Routledge to publish NASPA journals beginning in January 2015

Philadelphia – Taylor & Francis Group and NASPA–Student Affairs Administrators in Higher Education are pleased to announce a new publishing partnership for 2015. Beginning in January, Taylor & Francis will publish and distribute NASPA’s three highly regarded journals: Journal of Student Affairs Research and Practice, Journal of College and Character, and the NASPA Journal About Women in Higher Education under the Routledge imprint.

NASPA is the leading association for the advancement, health and sustainability of the student affairs profession. NASPA’s work provides high-quality professional development, advocacy, and research for 13,000 members in all 50 states, 25 countries, and 8 U.S. territories. For more information, please visit: http://www.naspa.org

Published quarterly, the Journal of Student Affairs Research and Practice publishes the most rigorous, relevant, and well-respected research and practice making a difference in student affairs, including unconventional papers that engage in methodological and epistemological extensions that transcend the boundaries of traditional research inquiries.

Journal of College and Character is a professional journal that examines how colleges and universities influence the moral and civic learning and behavior of students. Published quarterly, the journal features scholarly articles and applied research on issues related to ethics, values, and character development in a higher education setting.

NASPA Journal About Women in Higher Education focuses on issues affecting all women in higher education: students, student affairs staff, faculty, and other administrative groups. The journal is intended for both practitioners and researchers and includes articles that focus on empirical research, pedagogy, and administrative practice.

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information, please contact:

Emily Matthias - Senior Marketing Associate, Taylor & Francis Group.
Email: emily.matthias@taylorandfrancis.com
Tel: (215) 606-4238

, Philadelphia.

No longer “clean” or “dirty”

Substance Abuse journal calls for changes regarding pejorative language

In a ground-breaking editorial article published in Substance Abuse journal, the Editorial Board encourages researchers, reviewers, and even readers to consider and change some common terminology used to describe alcohol and other drug use and disorders, individuals affected by these conditions, their related behaviors, treatment, and recovery. Substance Abuse journal is the first scientific addiction journal to attempt to do so.

Language intentionally and unintentionally propagates stigma: the mark of dishonor, disgrace, and difference that depersonalizes people, depriving them of individual or personal qualities and personal identity. To adjust the stigma associated with substance use, the Editorial proposes four adjustments needed in the clinical language: (1) the use of “people-first language”, (2) a focus on the medical nature of substance use disorders and treatment, (3) promotion of the recovery process, and (4) less perpetuation of negative stereotype biases through the use of slang and idioms (e.g. terms such as “addict”, “pothead,”, “frequent flyer”, “clean”, or “dirty”).

“In my clinical experience, patients internalized this stigmatizing language all the time, and that led them to feel worse about themselves and the possibility of recovery,” explained Dr. Lauren Broyles, lead author of the article, who told a clinical story.

When working with a patient, who was feeling dejected for straying away from recovery and convinced his urine was "dirty", Broyles used the approach. “I explained to him that most people believe that everyone’s urine is considered dirty, he got a puzzled look on his face. I explained that in my mind, ‘dirty’ reflect the presence of germs, and asked if he meant that his urine screen would show that he had recently used an illicit substance (followed by an affirmative nod). I let him know that ‘dirty’ is not the correct term – we are monitoring a chronic medical illness and that the urine screen is used to help provide care, not to label him, blame him, or catch him in managing his illness.” 

The patient mentioned their conversation while in outpatient care, “it helped me not quit the treatment program because I was reminded that there are people out there really get it, and really care about how I myself think about what I’m doing, or not doing, for my recovery.”

“We too [Editorial Board members] are in a position of ‘unlearning’ various terms, phrases, and verbal shorthand, even terms like ‘abuse’ that seem second-nature,” explained Broyles. “By encouraging our authors to use alternative terms that more accurately describe addiction, treatment, and recovery, and, by being vocal about why those terms are favorable, we can be leaders in helping to re-frame what people think about substance use disorders.”

About Substance Abuse
Substance Abuse
journal is a peer-reviewed journal that serves as the official publication of the Association for Medical Education and Research in Substance Abuse (AMERSA) in association with The International Society of Addiction Medicine (ISAM) and the International Coalition for Addiction Studies in Education (INCASE). Substance Abuse journal offers wide-ranging coverage for healthcare professionals, addiction specialists and others engaged in research, education, clinical care, and service delivery and evaluation.

2013 Journal Citations Report® ranks Substance Abuse 12th out of 18 journals in Substance Abuse (Science) and 14th out of 33 journals in Substance Abuse (Social Sciences) with an Impact Factor of 1.620.
© 2014 Thomson Reuters, 2013 Journal Citation Reports®

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* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/08897077.2014.930372

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information please contact:
James Fischer, Marketing Associate, Journals
Email: james.fischer@taylorandfrancis.com

, Oxford.

Does your computer know how you’re feeling?

Researchers in Bangladesh have designed a computer programme that can accurately recognise users’ emotional states as much as 87% of the time, depending on the emotion.

Writing in the journal Behaviour & Information Technology, A.F.M. Nazmul Haque Nahin and his colleagues describe how their study combined – for the first time – two established ways of detecting user emotions: keystroke dynamics and text-pattern analysis.

To provide data for the study, volunteers were asked to note their emotional state after typing passages of fixed text, as well as at regular intervals during their regular (‘free text’) computer use; this provided the researchers with data about keystroke attributes associated with seven emotional states (joy, fear, anger, sadness, disgust, shame and guilt). To help them analyse sample texts, the researchers made use of a standard database of words and sentences associated with the same seven emotional states.

After running a variety of tests, the researchers found that their new ‘combined’ results were better than their separate results; what’s more, the ‘combined’ approach improved performance for five of the seven categories of emotion. Joy (87%) and anger (81%) had the highest rates of accuracy.

This research is an important contribution to ‘affective computing’, a growing field dedicated to ‘detecting user emotion in a particular moment’. As the authors note, for all the advances in computing power, performance and size in recent years, a lot more can still be done in terms of their interactions with end users. “Emotionally aware systems can be a step ahead in this regard,” they write.

“Computer systems that can detect user emotion can do a lot better than the present systems in gaming, online teaching, text processing, video and image processing, user authentication, and so many other areas where user emotional state is crucial.”

While much work remains to be done, this research is an important step in making ‘emotionally intelligent’ systems that recognise users’ emotional states to adapt their music, graphics, content, or approach to learning a reality.

NOTE TO JOURNALISTS
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* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/0144929X.2014.907343

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.  From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

Luke Antieul – Marketing Executive, Engineering Journals, Taylor & Francis Group.
Email: luke.antieul@tandf.co.uk
Tel: +44 (0)20 7551 9777

, Philadelphia.

Study shows zoning regulations impact where marijuana dispensaries can locate

Government regulations could lead to more dispensaries in low income, high minority areas.

Municipal zoning regulations may push marijuana dispensaries into low income, minority areas, according to a study released by the University of Colorado Denver.

Published in the Journal of the American Planning Association, the study shows that government regulations will likely cause an inequitable distribution of marijuana business throughout the city. Though the impact of dispensaries to the neighborhoods in which they are located has yet to be understood, the research is clear that the majority of allowable land for marijuana business is in the city’s poorest and most ethnically and racially diverse areas.

Witnessing the marijuana industry boom in Colorado, Jeremy Németh, Associate Professor and Chair of the Department of Planning and Design at the College of Architecture and Planning, and former graduate student, Eric Ross, conducted research to determine if government zoning regulations lead to inequality in the areas of the city where marijuana dispensaries are allowed to locate.

“Though technically medical marijuana dispensaries provide a healthcare service, they have historically been required to adopt the same zoning restrictions as businesses that sell alcohol, pornography, and firearms,” said Németh. “Generally, stores that sell these types of ‘vices’ are prohibited from locating in residential or mixed-use neighborhoods and are pushed into much less affluent neighborhoods.”

Nemeth says that even though the impacts of dispensaries on crime, property values, or quality of life are still unclear, residents are quickly crying “NIMBY” (Not In My Back Yard) when confronted with the prospect of these facilities being located in their neighborhoods.

Németh and Ross’s results show that the most vulnerable neighborhoods are those where income, education, and employment levels are lower than the city-wide average. In these socioeconomic disadvantaged areas of the city, 46% of the land was available for marijuana dispensaries, compared to 29% in wealthier areas.

“As medical marijuana has become legal in 23 states and DC, municipalities must determine where these businesses will be allowed to operate,” said Németh. “I encourage my students, and city planners, to think about the impacts zoning regulations have on the entire community, not just adopt regulations that have been in place for other vices.”

NOTE TO JOURNALISTS
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* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/01944363.2014.935241#.U-0HTYBdWxU

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information please contact:
Marisa Starr, Marketing Manager, Journals
Email: marisa.starr@taylorandfrancis.com

, Oxford.

Taylor & Francis announces Shibboleth compliancy in Canada

Taylor & Francis is delighted to announce an agreement with the Canadian Access Federation (CAF), supporting Shibboleth access in Canada. Shibboleth is a standards based, open source software package for computer networks and the Internet. The web-based Single Sign-on (SSO) system allows users to sign in to various systems run by ‘federations’ of different organizations or institutions, using just one ‘identity’.

Taylor & Francis also supports Austria, Germany, Greece, Italy, Spain, Switzerland, and the UK with Shibboleth access. Canada’s Shibboleth access is now live.

For more information on Shibboleth, visit http://shibboleth.internet2.edu/about.html

For further updates on Taylor & Francis agreements, or to update an institution’s account, visit http://www.tandfonline.com/page/librarians/authentication

About Taylor & Francis Group
Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.