Taylor & Francis Newsroom

, Oxford.

Taylor & Francis Editor honoured by water industry at Desalination conference

A recent international conference on desalination and water reuse in Qingdao, China has celebrated the work of Miriam Balaban, Editor-in-Chief and Founder of Desalination and Water Treatment, and her 50 years of working in the field of desalination.

The conference – sponsored by the Chinese government, and jointly supported by many global organisations in the water industry – was attended by over 1000 leaders, specialists and seniors of water industry from more than 50 countries.

Miriam Balaban has served as the secretary general of the European Desalination Society (EDS) since its founding. She edited the journal Desalination for over 40 years, and in 2009 launched Desalination and Water Treatment, where she remains today as Editor-in-Chief.

Image: Miriam Balaban is presented with a Lifetime Achievement award on behalf of the China Desalination Association (CDA) and the Qingdao International Conference on Desalination & Water Reuse. The award was presented by Dr. Guo Youzhi, the Secretary General of the CDA, and Professor Shichang Wang from Tianjin University.

Taylor & Francis would like to offer its congratulations to Miriam and celebrate her outstanding contribution, influence and leadership in the field of desalination over the last 50 years.

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information, please contact:

Ben Hudson, Taylor & Francis Group

Email: Benjamin.Hudson@tandf.co.uk

Follow us on Twitter @tandfnewsroom

, Oxford.

Is lack of guidance on The Sunshine Act hampering publication of clinical trial results?

A research article, published today in Postgraduate Medicine, has concluded that a lack of professional guidance on how to interpret elements of The Physician Payments Sunshine Act (2010) may be having a “chilling effect” on physicians’ desire to participate in clinical trials and publish results.

The Sunshine Act and Medical Publications: Guidance from Professional Medical Associations’ reviews the literature issued by professional associations, with the goal of identifying what guidance has been provided to physicians on the Act and, crucially, on any non-monetary support provided by the pharmaceutical industry to those who write medical publications on licensed drugs. 

The Act, passed in 2010 and recently upheld by the US Supreme Court, legislated for the mandatory reporting of some financial transactions between pharmaceutical companies and licensed physicians, whether direct or indirect payments, also known as transfers of value (TOV). However, the Act was not specific on the interpretation and significance of non-monetary assistance for the development of medical publications. The research published today found only sparse information available from professional associations on this, raising questions such as ‘is provision of editorial support by pharmaceutical companies reportable as TOV?’

Kim Pepitone, senior author of the paper said of their findings,  

I believe we continue to raise more questions than provide answers as to how to interpret the Sunshine Act with respect to reportability of non-monetary support to physician authors. Many companies believe that the support is actually in the other direction; that authors provide important help to companies to interpret and publish their clinical research.

The authors’ conclude such lack of clarity may have led to confusion among physicians who publish, with publications asking for full disclosure but various interpretations of whether this non-monetary aid should be reported to regulatory bodies as a TOV. The authors shine a light on how this grey area may have implications for patients, physicians (whether author or reader) and journal editors alike, and once again raises the importance of financial and non-financial transparency between physician and pharma.

NOTE TO JOURNALISTS
When referencing the article: Please include Journal title, author, published by Taylor & Francis and the following statement:

* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00325481.2015.1084211

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.  From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

Luke Antieul – Marketing Executive, Engineering Journals, Taylor & Francis Group.
Email: luke.antieul@tandf.co.uk
Tel: +44 (0)20 7551 9777

, Oxford.

Using humor to help toddlers learn

We all know that laughter is the best medicine, but a team of French scientists has discovered that using humor also appears to help toddlers learn new tasks, reports a new study in the journal Cognition and Emotion.

Building on the knowledge that making older children laugh can enhance many aspects of cognition, Rana Esseily and her colleagues designed an experiment to see whether using humor could also have an effect on the ability of infants to learn.

Each of the 18-month-olds selected to participate in the final part of the study observed an adult using a tool to grab an out-of-reach toy. In one group the adult simply played with the toy after retrieving it; but in the other group, the adult threw the toy immediately on the floor, which made half the children in that group laugh.

When Esseily and her colleagues studied their data, they found that the children who laughed at the antics of the adults were able to repeat the action themselves more successfully than those who didn’t laugh, as well as those who were included in the ‘humorless’ control group.

Why laughter seems to be related to the toddlers’ ability to learn isn’t entirely clear, but Esseily and her team put forward two possible explanations. The first relates to temperament. “In this case, it is not humor per se that may have facilitated learning,” the authors suggest, “but [that] temperamentally ‘smiley’ babies were more likely to engage with the environment and therefore to attempt and succeed at the task.” It could also be the case that ‘laughing babies’ might have higher social skills or cognitive capacities, allowing them to interact more easily with others and making them more amenable to mimicking the actions of others.

The second explanation the authors put forward relates to brain chemistry. It is well known that positive emotions, like laughter or engaging well with an experimenter, can increase dopamine levels in the brain, which in turn has a positive effect on learning. “Thus, the effect observed here might be a general effect due to positive emotion and not to humor or laughter per se,” they note.

More research needs to be done into the effect of humor on learning, of course, but parents about to embark on the un-funny business of toilet training might want to keep laughing – no matter what.     

NOTE TO JOURNALISTS
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* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/02699931.2015.1036840

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life. As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, e-books and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine. 

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues. 

For more information please contact: 
Claire Thomas, Senior Marketing Executive, Behavioral Science Journals 
email: claire.thomas@tandf.co.uk

, Oxford.

The maths behind surviving a global zombie attack

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information, please contact:

Ben Hudson, Taylor & Francis Group

Email: Benjamin.Hudson@tandf.co.uk

Follow us on Twitter @tandfnewsroom

, Oxford.

Harder, better, stronger: the new alloy with the highest strength-to-weight ratio among metals

A low-density, nanocrystalline high-entropy alloy was produced by mechanical alloying. It formed a single-phase fcc structure during ball milling and transformed to single-phase hcp upon annealing. The alloy has an estimated strength-to-weight ratio that is significantly higher than other nanocrystalline alloys and is comparable to ceramics. as explored in Materials Research Letters.

NOTE TO JOURNALISTS
When referencing the article: Please include Journal title, author, published by Taylor & Francis and the following statement:

* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/21663831.2014.985855

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information, please contact:

Lauren Harvey, Taylor & Francis Group

Email: lauren.harvey@tandf.co.uk

Follow us on Twitter @tandfnewsroom

, Oxford.

The bane of your existence: smartphones and ‘technostress’

The bane of your existence: smartphones and ‘technostress’

If you feel stressed out by your smartphone, it might be down to your personality as well as your phone, a new study suggests.

Writing in the journal Behaviour & Information Technology, Yu-Kang Lee and colleagues explored the relationship between four key personality traits, the types of phones people used and the levels of ‘technostress’ they experienced.

The first trait they studied was ‘locus of control’, which the authors defined as ‘the extent to which people believe that their actions determine their rewards in life’. As smartphones blur the line between home and work, encourage multi-tasking and constant checking, the authors found them unsurprisingly to be a greater source of technostress than traditional phones. ‘This has been called the “helpful-stressful cycle”, in which one purchases a smartphone to help manage the workload only to have it induce stress and become the bane of one’s existence,’ they observe.

The second trait the authors explored was ‘social interaction anxiety’ (SIA). As people with high SIA are more likely to depend on the internet for social networking, they are also more likely to suffer the negative side effects of excessive use including stress caused by repeated smartphone checking and internet addiction.  

The third trait was the ‘need for touch’, which can be satisfied in many people by constantly fiddling with their smartphone touch screens – a problem users of traditional phones don’t have. However, the fact that touching a smartphone becomes almost compelling is yet another source of technostress for their users.

The final trait, materialism, was the only one that seemed to cause more technostress in users of traditional phones than smartphones. The reason why isn’t clear, but the authors suggest that perhaps users of snazzy smartphones have already reached a ‘ceiling’ in terms of their own material desires and therefore how much stress it can cause them.

So we now know that certain personality traits can make people more prone to suffer technostress, and health professionals may be able to identify and treat people who fall victim to technostress. And finally, this new work can also help individual users: the authors recommend that people with high levels of technostress – and the ‘attendant psychological characteristics’ – reduce their mobile usage, which is probably good advice for us all.

Follow us on Twitter @tandfengineer

NOTE TO JOURNALISTS
When referencing the article: Please include Journal title, author, published by Taylor & Francis and the following statement:

* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/0144929X.2015.1055800

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information, please contact:
Dan Hall
Marketing Executive, Taylor & Francis
Email: Daniel.Hall@tandf.co.uk

, Oxford.

Age and thinking style affect how young people evaluate online information

With current research suggesting that many young people don’t question the information they find online, a new study in the Journal of Children and Media reveals the factors that are most likely to predict they will.

Miriam Metzger and her colleagues measured the awareness and skill in evaluating the credibility of online information of nearly 3000 children aged 11–18 in three distinct ways – one of which involved viewing a ‘hoax’ website.

Their results confirmed that certain developmental and demographic characteristics can make young people more effective information evaluators. “Older children … reported using more analytic credibility evaluation strategies, including being more aware of credibility as a potential problem of online information, and were less likely to believe the hoax sites compared to younger children,” they observed. “As children mature, they become more sophisticated information consumers and are better
able to use contextual cues to evaluate information.”

The researchers also discovered that young people’s ‘cognitive styles’ had an effect on how they evaluated information. “Across all outcomes except believing the hoax websites, the thinking style variables – including need for cognition, flexible thinking, and faith in intuition – emerged as the strongest predictors of young people’s awareness of credibility problems and information evaluation skill,” they observe.

“Being open to various and conflicting perspectives and liking to think hard about problems led to higher reported use of more effortful credibility evaluation tactics, while faith in intuition and trusting others led young people to be more trusting of online information.”

As might be expected, academic performance was also associated with children’s heavier use of analytic credibility evaluation strategies; however, other factors, like family income, had little impact.

But when it came to exploring the effect of formal training in the evaluation of online information, the authors discovered that contrary to what they expected, “youth who reported having been exposed more to online credibility evaluation training were also more likely to believe the hoax sites, even as they were more likely also to use analytic evaluation strategies.” This surprising finding suggests that although training can help children evaluate material, it doesn’t necessarily mean they will, or that they will do it effectively.  

This study provides important insight into how even ‘digital natives’ can have difficulties in their own environment. It should also empower educators and parents to make children aware, from an early age, of the need to be critical consumers of information, as well as to provide them with the appropriate guidance.

NOTE TO JOURNALISTS
When referencing the article: Please include Journal title, author, published by Taylor & Francis and the following statement:

* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17482798.2015.1056817

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

, Philadelphia.

Routledge to publish National Art Education Association journals beginning in 2016

Routledge and the National Art Education Association (NAEA) are pleased to announce a new co-publishing partnership. Beginning in January 2016, Taylor & Francis will publish NAEA’s distinguished publications—Art Education, Studies in Art Education, and NAEA News—under the Routledge imprint.

"Through our partnership with Routledge/Taylor & Francis, the National Art Education Association looks forward to a new phase of expansion and exposure to a wider audience for our print periodicals program. Both the awareness and the audience for our authors and researchers, as well as for NAEA, will grow—with enhanced digital publishing and archiving, tracking of article interaction, marketing to wider library audiences and other archiving services, and stronger advertising efforts, " noted Deborah B. Reeve, Executive Director of NAEA.

Art Education, the official journal of the National Art Education Association, covers a diverse range of topics dealing with subjects of professional interest to art educators. It is published bi-monthly in full-color, and each issue features an Instructional Resource section, making Art Education a great addition to every teacher's reference library.

Studies in Art Education is a quarterly journal that reports quantitative, qualitative, historical, and philosophical research in art education—including explorations of theory and practice in the areas of art production, art criticism, aesthetics, art history, human development, curriculum and instruction, and assessment. Studies also publishes reports of applicable research in related fields such as anthropology, education, psychology, philosophy, and sociology.

NAEA News, the official newsletter for the members of NAEA, reports to members on what is happening throughout the organization as well as in the field of art education—within every teaching level, geographic region, and issues group. Columnists present timely news topics regarding upcoming conferences and events, trends and policies, and member and group activities.

The NAEA publications will be a valuable addition to Routledge’s extensive list of education and visual arts titles. Routledge is the Social Science and Humanities division of Taylor & Francis Group and includes leading titles in the field such as Arts Education Policy Review, The Art Bulletin, and the Teaching Artist Journal.

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.   From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.  For more information please contact:

Tara Golebiewski, Journals Marketing Associate

email: tara.golebiewski@taylorandfrancis.com

, Oxford.

Ghanaian migrant youth: reasons for migration never to return

In an increasingly globalised world, intercontinental migration has become a cultural norm and an aspiration amongst the youth of Sub-Saharan Africa. Recent research published in the Journal of Youth Studies examined a group of pre-migrant Ghanaian undergraduates’ intent on entering the diaspora. Dako-Gyeke studies key motivators for migration, popular destinations and challenges facing return migrants. Why do many migrants plan to leave their homeland permanently and what support is there for those who come home?

Migration for many young Africans is an opportunity to broaden horizons, see the world, to learn new cultures and languages. Above all, migration provides a stab at enhanced education and employment opportunities and an escape from unemployment and poverty faced by a lot of young people in Ghana. Many migrant workers however are disillusioned in their dreams of a better life, experiencing poor working conditions, low earnings and even abuse. What happens when a migrant’s quest for self-discovery ends badly? Little is known about why migrants return – is it a sign of failure? A series of qualitative focus groups were held among participants to identify goals for migration, inextricably linked to why they might return.

The majority of participants’ aims centred on career, education and economic progression, some to support themselves and extended family back home. Britain, Canada and the US emerged as the most popular migration destinations. Strong educational and economic infrastructure and lesser language barriers were attractive to migrants seeking permanent integration into a society. Permanent migration has a certain finality, but the decision is not always entirely the migrant’s own. Many are financed by extended family, after being selected as the best contender for success, earning good money and improving quality of life for the whole family. If migrants come home, they have failed and may bear the brunt of anger, disappointment and stigmatisation within the community. Others theorise that return does not represent failure, but a fulfilled goal of a well-paid job and sufficient savings for a better future in the country of origin.

Either way, there is a strong flow of African migrants to Europe and America, boosting the lacking labour force. Many have positive experiences, whilst others are unable to meet their expectations for legal and decent employment. The latter may be left even more vulnerable and poorly off, with no support from society and family. For these, the author calls for government policies and societal support for reintegration: “it is essential for other stakeholders like social workers and immigration officers to provide counseling and education aimed at protecting the personal, social and psychological wellbeing of return migrants.”

NOTE TO JOURNALISTS
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* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13676261.2015.1059929

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.   From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information please contact:
Rebecca Bray
Taylor & Francis Journals
Email: rebecca.bray@tandf.co.uk

, Oxford.

Dream of feeling less tired? The trick comes with age

The elderly are doing something right. New research into the effects of age on sleep suggests our older community sleep less, but report better quality sleep, and feel more awake during the day.

“Although sleep is a biomarker for general health and pathological conditions, its changes across age and gender are poorly understood.” Researchers from the University of Lausanne, Switzerland, have responded to this gap in sleep research in a recent paper published in Annals of Medicine: ‘Age and gender variations of sleep in subjects without sleep disorders’.

To assess individuals’ sleep patterns Gianina Luca et al. carried out a mixture of subjective and objective evaluation of sleep, ranging from questionnaires to sleep study. This enabled them to examine both the physical differences in sleep and whether individuals of different ages interpreted their sleep quality differently. The research team studied 6733 participants, aged 35-75 years, all of whom were “randomly selected between 2003 and 2006 from the adult general population of Lausanne”. They were also keen to exclude individuals who had declared sleep disorders, in order to focus their study on the sleep changes of healthy individuals over the years.

The research resulted in a number of fascinating findings. It firstly revealed that “Aging was associated with a gradual shift towards morningness”, with the older population going to bed earlier and rising earlier than their younger counterparts. It was also observed that they slept for less time. Despite this reduced sleep-time, the paper informs us that “Older subjects complain less about sleepiness, and pathological sleepiness is significantly lower than younger subjects”, suggesting that they actually require less sleep.

Sleep latency, the length of time it takes you to fall asleep at night, is shown to increase with age, but only for women, with little difference in men’s speed of getting to sleep. However “sleep efficiency decreases with age in both genders”, with older people more restless during sleep and more likely to wake up than younger individuals. Although they experienced decreased sleep efficiency, the older participants themselves reported better sleep quality and daytime functioning. Luca et al. suggest that “One possible explanation for better rating of daytime and sleep quality is an adaptation of expectations about sleep in older populations, or an acclimatization to sleep changes over time.”

Whilst we may not actually get a better night’s sleep as we grow older, the research suggests that we will be more satisfied with our sleep patterns and quality, will feel less tired, and consequently will function better during the day. The authors conclude that “Sleep complaints in older subjects are not normal and should prompt the identification of underlying causes.”

NOTE TO JOURNALISTS
When referencing the article: Please include Journal title, author, published by Taylor & Francis and the following statement:

* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.3109/07853890.2015.1074271

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.  From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

Luke Antieul – Medical Journals, Taylor & Francis Group.
Email: emma.cianchi@tandf.co.uk
Tel: +44 (0)20 7551 9590