Taylor & Francis Newsroom

, Philadelphia.

Olive oil: the key to curing cancer?

Extra virgin olive oil (EVOO), long-known for its heart health benefits, has now been identified for its rapid destruction of cancer cells. While scientists have proven that the oleocanthal compound found in EVOO causes cell death in cancer cells, they have been unable to provide an explanation for this phenomenon until now. Paul Breslin, David Foster, and Onica LeGendre offer answers in their paper “(-)-Oleocanthal Rapidly and Selectively Induces Cancer Cell Death Via Lysosomal Membrane Permeabilization (LMP),” published in Molecular & Cellular Oncology.

In their recent study, the researchers discovered that the key to understanding the toxic effect of oleocantha  in cancerous cells lies in its reaction with the lysosomes of the cell, where the cells store waste: the oleocantha ruptures the cancer cell lysosomes causing cell death within 30 minutes to an hour while leaving un-cancerous cells unharmed. This suggests that the lysosomal membranes of cancerous cells are weaker than those of uncancerous cells. Because of oleocantha’s targeted damage to cancer cells, it may prove an ideal option for therapeutic cancer treatment. Paul Breslin, co-author of the study, said “The mechanism of killing cancer cells and sparing healthy cells, lysosomal membrane permeabilization, has been hypothesized as a possible mechanism of effectively killing cancer cells and sparing healthy tissues but has never been realized before.  Our realization of this makes this paper of particular therapeutic interest for cancer treatment.”

The study’s focus on the effect of oleocantha on cancerous and un-cancerous cells leads to larger implications about the health benefits of the Mediterranean diet, which is rich in EVOO. Breslin stated, “the Mediterranean diet is known to be associated with a reduced risk of many different kinds of cancer.  Whereas the entire diet likely has many benefits, this study points directly to the olive oil phenolic, oleocanthal, as playing an especially important role in these observations. As more people turn to the Mediterranean diet as a healthy life option, oleocanthal is growing in its significance as a key active component of this diet.”

NOTE TO JOURNALISTS
When referencing the article: Please include Journal title, author, published by Taylor & Francis and the following statement:

* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/23723556.2015.1006077

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.   From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information please contact: 
Jillian O’Hara – Science and Technology Journals Marketing Assistant
e-mail: jillian.ohara@taylorandfrancis.com

Follow us on Twitter @tandfnewsroom

, Oxford.

“Morally objectionable”: the book ‘Orange is the New Black’ on screen

A Cornell University political theorist has raised several concerns about the award-winning Netflix series Orange is the New Black when compared to the book on which it is based.

Writing in the journal New Political Science, Anna Marie Smith notes that the Netflix show, due to launch its third series, is a "mass cultural product", unlike the sensitive, critical prison memoir which provided its source material. Smith even goes as far as to call the series "morally objectionable" in her short review.

In the original version of Orange is the New Black, author Piper Kerman guides her readers, “the privileged and largely white audience”, through what Smith calls a “colonized underworld”.

“We can relate to her well enough to trust her to pull us into the story and to serve as our translator,” Smith notes. “Sharing her perspective with us, she makes this absolutely foreign space alluring, knowledgeable, and digestible for us.”

But when it comes to the television treatment of the same story – which involves lesbian sex, drugs, money-laundering and prison – Smith is highly critical. “The Kerman memoir handles the sensationalism of its material with great insight and care,” she writes. “The Netflix series, by contrast, promotes the narcissism of the privileged white gaze – a gaze that often has a male heterosexual structure – to an unconscionable degree.”

Smith observes that while in the book Kerman makes “privileged white narcissism and the invisibility of mass incarceration the subject of extended critical meditation”, the Netflix version of Orange succeeds because it “can be almost all things to all people”, including “softcore porn for the male homophobe; confirmation of racist and ethnic slurs about irresponsible and workshy black women and Latinas for white cultural racists; and a limited but accurate archive of sex positive lesbian history.”

Despite her objections, Smith concedes that the Netflix version of Orange does, on occasion, offer viewers moments of "fugitive critique" of US social problems and prison life. Smith refers in particular to the series’ visual portrayal of the horrors of solitary confinement, the brutality of guards, institutional racism, addiction and mental-health problems suffered by inmates.

Smith’s short review provides food for thought on not only how crime, race, sex and the realities of prison life are portrayed on screen, but also how these issues intersect in real life for the millions of people currently in jail in the United States – of which women like Kerman are the fastest growing population.

NOTE TO JOURNALISTS
When referencing the article: Please include Journal title, author, published by Taylor & Francis and the following statement:

* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/07393148.2014.995401

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.   From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information please contact:
Mel Phillips, Marketing Executive
Taylor & Francis Journals
Email: melissa.phillips@tandf.co.uk

, Oxford.

Bloomsbury Journals to join the Routledge Social Science, Arts & Humanities program

Bloomsbury Journals, comprising 25 titles in Arts & Humanities and 21 titles in Law (published under the Hart imprint) are to join the Routledge publishing program. 

The titles complement the existing subject scope at Routledge and extend opportunities for critical debate in new and emerging subject areas. Routledge Law has a strong and growing reach, including developments in socio-legal studies and interdisciplinary approaches. Routledge Arts & Humanities is well known for its program across a wide range of areas, including anthropology, visual arts, performance, design, literature, philosophy, communication and cultural studies.

Routledge and Bloomsbury Journals will work closely to ensure a smooth transition for all journals, partners and stakeholders involved. Institutional customers should direct 2015 subscription queries to acquisitionenquiries@tandf.co.uk and will be notified when their online access is to be transferred to Taylor & Francis Online.

Dr David Green, Taylor & Francis Group’s Global Journals Publishing Director, comments: ‘We are delighted that these highly regarded journal portfolios are joining Routledge where there is strong complementarity and investment in the areas of Law, Arts & Humanities.’ 

Jonathan Glasspool, Divisional Managing Director at Bloomsbury, added:  ‘Bloomsbury continues to invest considerably in building its academic and professional book programme and growing its digital publishing programme in Law and the Humanities.  Our academic journals will fit very well within the much larger Routledge journal portfolio’.

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.   From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information please contact:

Matthew Peck, Communications Manager: Library & Media Relations
Taylor & Francis Journals
Email: Matthew.Peck@tandf.co.uk

, New York.

Cultural Anthropology and the Contemporary World

Routledge is delighted to announce that the first title in the new 101 series, Jack David Eller’s Cultural Anthropology: 101, is now available. Intended for readers approaching a subject for the first time, the books in this series introduce fundamental topics and provides an overview of essential issues.

According to Gregory R. Campbell from the University of Minnesota, “Cultural Anthropology: 101 is a jargon free, concise introduction to socio-cultural anthropology. The text offers a platform to a sub-discipline of anthropology, illustrating its major theories and concepts to the larger anthropological discipline and our ever-changing world.”

Cultural Anthropology: 101 develops readers’ understanding and engagement by addressing key issues such as what it means to be human, the conflict between political, social, and ethnic boundaries, and the concept of economic anthropology.

Cultural Anthropology: 101 is an essential guide for anyone interested in exploring this fascinating field.

Jack David Eller is Associate Professor of Anthropology at the Community College of Denver. He has over twenty years of teaching experience and has published several previous books in anthropology, including a full-length textbook on cultural anthropology called Cultural Anthropology: Global Forces, Local Lives (2013).

More information.  

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information please contact:

Samantha Skurdahl
Marketing Assistant
Email: samantha.skurdahl@taylorandfrancis.com
Direct line: +1 (917) 351-7157

, Oxford.

When it comes to the digital playground we need to stop crying wolf

Kids are leading the transition to digital media today. But, while too much time online could cause developmental problems, media consumption habits may not be making our children less bright or sociable, after all, says Taylor & Francis.

Recently published in the International Journal of Play, a new study looks at two of the most emblematic Disney movies, Davy Crockett and Frozen, and investigates the changes in children’s response to films in the 1950s and the 2010s. It also reveals that, beyond the technological and cultural advancements of the past 60 years, childhood creativity and innovation are still at the core of young people’s development today.

There is no doubt play is at the hearth of literacy. ‘Through play children represent their understanding of the world around them symbolically’; they also exercise their vocabulary as well as imagination through storytelling, explains the author of the study. Popular culture, including films like the Disney ones, represents a crucial part of this practice. Drawing on the work of the Opies, as well as on an impressive body of information encompassing primary and secondary sources, this novel research shows the degree to which technological and commercial advancements have impacted on children’s media consumption in the past 60 years. Fuelled by social media communication practices amongst fans, the speed at which knowledge transfers between playgrounds (playground hype), the popularity of parodic play, as well as the importance of music, which is now a mainstream phenomenon as shown by the global appeal of the Frozen soundtrack, have exponentially grown in intensity and magnitude in the 2010s. All those sleek marketing activities (brandom) that so cunningly tap into fans’ passions in an attempt to prolong interest in movies for as long as possible, are other critical signs of the commercial and social changes brought about by the digital revolution. Interestingly, adults’ response to children’s crazes and interests were reported to have remained almost unchanged since the 1950s in the study. This is imputable to the fact that parents forget they once took part in similar manias themselves, and panick about film implications as much now as when back in the 50s. But what about the nature of play and literacy, then?

This interesting study reveals that, while both films prompted fantasy play, contemporary play is characterised by a process of more complex assemblage, which is enhanced by kids’ online relationships. Even if the key features of childhood still remain at the hearth of our daily life, due to the technological and cultural changes of the past 60 years, kids’ response to popular movies is significantly different today. With fans becoming prod-users, ‘peer-to-peer multimodal multimedia creations’ will increasingly come to be a primary focus for play, literacy and creativity, explains the author. Clearly, things no longer look that bad in the digital playground now. Perhaps it’s time to stop crying wolf, then?

NOTE TO JOURNALISTS
When referencing the article: Please include Journal title, author, published by Taylor & Francis and the following statement:

* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/21594937.2014.975975

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.   From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information please contact:
Zoe Miller
Journals Marketing Executive
Email: zoe.miller@tandf.co.uk

Follow us on Twitter @tandfnewsroom

 

, Oxford.

Taylor & Francis eBooks DRM-free from March 2015

With over 50,000 eBooks from imprints including Routledge, Psychology Press, and Focal Press, Taylor & Francis eBooks is the premier platform for academics to find the information they need.

Taylor & Francis is continually investing in ways to make this wealth of must-have content more discoverable and accessible to its customers, and is therefore pleased to announce the following changes:

All titles purchased by institutions from March 1st 2015 onwards on Taylor & Francis eBooks will be DRM-free (Digital Rights Management-free): available for access and use without restriction, including unlimited concurrent sessions. In addition the majority of titles already purchased on Taylor & Francis eBooks will become DRM-free. Full listings of institutions’ holdings and their current DRM status will be sent to customers shortly.

In addition, in 2015 a range of new functions are now available on the site, with powerful filtered search options allowing users to intuitively reach the most relevant content.

Find out more about the exciting changes taking place on Taylor & Francis eBooks.

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information, please contact:

Neil Boon
Senior Marketing Manager, Taylor & Francis Group
Email: Neil.Boon@tandf.co.uk 
Tel: +44 (0)20 7017 7706

, Oxford.

When Putting Race in the Picture Journalists Turn to Guidelines. Not their Audience.

A new study published by Taylor & Francis claims journalists turn to established professional standards of practice when faced with challenging news stories, even to the detriment of audience expectations.

Featured in the latest issue of Journalism Studies, the article by Dylan M. McLemore titled ‘Institutional Isomorphism and the Community Structure Approach in Visual Framing of the Trayvon Martin Shooting’ surveys the coverage of the Trayvon Martin shooting and explores the factors at play in the visual framing of this racially divisive event.

One of the major crime stories of 2012, the shooting of African-American teenager Trayvon Martin by 28-year-old-mixed-race Hispanic George Zimmerman made the US headlines for months. But due to its racially charged content, the story was no mean feat for journalists to illustrate. So, how did the US media go about visually framing this tricky narrative? ‘When facing great uncertainty, institutions look to mimic one another […] in a process called institutional isomorphism’, explains the author of the study. In the media world this translates into local media outlets following the agenda of key national ones, with an increasing homogenisation of news content. However, because the views and expectations of local communities effect the output of their media outlets, the normative effect of agenda setting is often contrasted by forces of community structure, in particular at regional level.

To establish whether institutional isomorphism or community structure played a part in the visual framing of the Martin shooting, a detailed content analysis of 187 articles and 117 photographs from two elite national newspapers – The New York Times and the Washington Post – as well as three local publications from racially distinct communities was carried out.  It was assumed an equal distribution of positive and negative images of Martin and Zimmerman amongst national and regional outlets would indicate isomorphism; similarly, a predominantly positive depiction of Martin by Afro-American newspapers would provide evidence of community structure. Even if image frequency was observed in all publications, which mostly featured photos of Martin, the dissimilar coverage provided by The New York Times and the Washington Post – with the former giving nearly equal visual prominence to both subjects, and the latter almost exclusively to Trayvon – indicated no evidence of mimic isomorphism. However, as the story progressed, images of Zimmermann started to increase. Because journalists began to publish the photos available at the time, they followed a set of ‘widely adopted professional standards’; this is a typical behaviour at times of instability, which is known as normative isomorphism, explains the author. Last but not the least, the overwhelming majority of positive images of Martin across all publications, regardless of their connection to communities of different racial make-up, demonstrated community structure had no part in the visual framing of the story.

Although more research is needed in the field, this study provides an invaluable preliminary look into the visual framing of the Trayvon Martin shooting. It also suggests that, when media professionals are faced with high level of risk in editorial decisions about controversial issues, institutional norms, not audience expectations, often have the upper hand.

NOTE TO JOURNALISTS
When referencing the article: Please include Journal title, author, published by Taylor & Francis and the following statement:

* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17512786.2014.988993

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.   From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.  For more information please contact:

Harriet Canavan, Marketing Executive, Journals
email: harriet.payne@tandf.co.uk

, Oxford.

Facebook in mourning: mediatisation of death and RIP pages as virtual shrines

In the wake of high a profile death, it is increasingly common to see mass public outpourings of grief on RIP Facebook pages.  This article in New Review of Hypermedia and Multimedia explores media coverage of death and its relation to public expression of grief via social media.

Contemporary society is far removed from death; few die at home; hospitals and funeral homes deal with the aftermath.  Death rituals are private and many mourners are socially unsupported outside the confines of home.  Public expression of grief is not the norm.  However death in the media is far from taboo; prevalent in TV drama and news media coverage of celebrity or shocking and dramatic death.  Online memorials are seen by many as a destination for “grief tourists” with suspect motivations.  Is mediatisation of death simply a channel for morbid curiosity?  Klastrup argues that RIP pages provide a space to share grief and bond in the face of death.  She reasons that RIP sites are legitimate virtual shrines for respectful strangers to sympathise and identify with the bereaved, just as they lay flowers at the scene of a tragic death.

The author observed RIP pages paying tribute to 6 young Danes, whose deaths received high profile press coverage.  In context of their post mortem celebrity status, she studied the relationship between ‘RIP-ing’ and media coverage alongside communicative practices on RIP pages.  Each 5000+ strong RIP page was monitored for types of expression, address and familiarity then cross referenced with press coverage within 2 weeks of death.  The immediacy of the most messages after press coverage showed media hype as a probable driver.  Posts were mainly from strangers, a notable difference from pages with smaller followings and less press where visitors typically include friends and family. 

Fascinatingly many addressed the deceased directly, this connection presumably an attempt to keep the person and their memory alive.  A lack of collective spirit amongst mourners showed most messages to be a fleeting expression of sympathy from unconnected individuals “like a candle or a flower left by a stranger, never to return to the site again.

RIP pages have changed the speed, scope and form of mourning.  News media heightens awareness to individual cases, spurring waves of online public grief and empathy.  The author concludes that RIP pages “provide material for news media coverage of spectacular deaths…which in turn are likely to drive more traffic and more strangers there…. we need more studies on the relation between news media and digital social platforms, and the role both types of media play as enablers and mediators of new public mourning”.

NOTE TO JOURNALISTS
When referencing the article: Please include Journal title, author, published by Taylor & Francis and the following statement:

* Read the full article online:www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13614568.2014.983564

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information, please contact:

Ben Hudson, Taylor & Francis Group

Email: Benjamin.Hudson@tandf.co.uk

, New York.

What “green transformations” will humanity need to undergo to live sustainably on planet Earth?

What “green transformations” will humanity need to undergo to live sustainably on planet Earth?

New book published by Routledge

The Politics of Green Transformations, edited by Ian Scoones, Melissa Leach and Peter Newell, examines what social and political alliances are required to undertake these green transformations.

Recalling past transformations, this book examines what makes the current challenge different, and especially urgent. It examines how green transformations must take place in the context of the particular moments of capitalist development, and in relation to particular alliances. The role of the state is emphasised, both in terms of the type of incentives required to make green transformations politically feasible and in the way states must take a developmental role in financing innovation and technology for green transformations.

The book also highlights the role of citizens as innovators, entrepreneurs, green consumers and members of social movements. Green transformations must be both ‘top-down’, involving elite alliances between states and business as well as ‘bottom up’, pushed by grassroots innovators and entrepreneurs, and part of wider mobilisations among civil society. The chapters in the book draw on international examples to emphasise how these contexts matter in shaping pathways to sustainability.

Professor Peter Newell, University of Sussex said: “It is now received wisdom in most quarters that we need to transform the global economy along more sustainable lines. But who decides what is to be transformed and how, and who will benefit from this? Questions of transformation are about politics, power and coalitions as much as technology, markets and innovation alone. This book shows how and why these matter and what’s at stake in the politics of green transformations.”

The Politics of Green Transformations is part of the Pathways to Sustainability Series, which is based on the work of the Social, Technological and Environmental Pathways to Sustainability (STEPS) Centre, a major investment of the UK Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC). The STEPS Centre brings together researchers at the Institute of Development Studies (IDS) and SPRU (Science and Technology Policy Research) at the University of Sussex with a set of partner institutions in Africa, Asia and Latin America.

About Routledge/Taylor & Francis

Routledge is the world's leading academic publisher in the Humanities and Social Sciences. We publish thousands of books and journals each year, serving scholars, instructors, and professional communities worldwide. Our current publishing programme encompasses groundbreaking textbooks and premier, peer-reviewed research in the Social Sciences, Humanities, and Built Environment. We have partnered with many of the most influential societies and academic bodies to publish their journals and book series. Readers can access tens of thousands of print and e-books from our extensive catalogue of titles. Routledge is a member of Taylor & Francis Group, an informa business.

For more information, please contact:

Katy Kasle
Marketing Manager
711 Third Ave. | New York | NY 10017 | USA
P: 212.216.7835
E: katharine.kasle@taylorandfrancis.com

, Oxford.

130 Years of Flooding in the UK

13 decades-long dataset of reported flooding in the UK released by University of Southampton researchers

A recent Hydrological Sciences Journal study from a group of researchers at the University of Southampton describes a long term dataset of reported flooding based on reports from the UK Meteorological Office and the UK Centre for Ecology and Hydrology. Unaware of any other 100+ year records of flood events and their consequences on a national scale, the authors believe that this is quite possibly a unique dataset.

Flood events are classified by severity based upon qualitative descriptions. There is an increase in the number of reported flood events over time associated with an increased exposure to flooding as floodplain areas were developed. The data was de-trended for exposure, using population and dwelling house data. The adjusted record shows that there is significant decade to decade variability.

This study opens a new approach considering flood occurrence over a long timescale using reported information (and thus likely effects on society) rather than just considering trends in extreme hydrological conditions.

NOTE TO JOURNALISTS
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* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/02626667.2014.950581

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information, please contact:

Alan Crompton, Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group Email: Alan.Crompton@tandf.co.uk Tel: +44 (20) 701 74225