Taylor & Francis Newsroom

, Oxford.

Could sing-a-long science be the key to straight A’s?

Does “edutainment” such as content-rich music videos have any place in the rapidly changing landscape of science education? A new study indicates that students can indeed learn serious science content from such videos.

The study, titled ‘Leveraging the power of music to improve science education’ and published by International Journal of Science Education, examined over 1,000 students in a three-part experiment, comparing learners’ understanding and engagement in response to 24 musical and non-musical science videos.

The central findings were that (1) across ages and genders, K-16 students who viewed music videos improved their scores on quizzes about content covered in the videos, and (2) students preferred music videos to non-musical videos covering equivalent content. Additionally, the results hinted that videos with music might lead to superior long-term retention of the content.

“We tested most of these students outside of their normal classrooms,” commented lead author Greg Crowther, Ph.D., a lecturer at the University of Washington. “The students were not forced by their teachers to watch these videos, and they didn’t have the spectre of a low course grade hanging over their heads. Yet they clearly absorbed important information, which highlights the great potential of music to deliver key content in an appealing package.”

The study was inspired by the classroom experiences of Crowther and co-author Tom McFadden, who teaches science at the Nueva School in California. “Tom and I, along with many others, write songs for and with our students, and we’ve had a lot of fun doing that,” said Crowther. “But rather than just assuming that this works, we wanted to see whether we could document learning gains in an objective way.”

The findings of this study have implications for teacher practitioners, policy-makers and researchers who are looking for innovative ways to improve science education. “Music will always be a supplement to, rather than a substitute for, more traditional forms of teaching,” said Crowther. “But teachers who want to connect with their students through music now have some additional data on their side.”

NOTE TO JOURNALISTS
When referencing the article: Please include Journal title, author, published by Taylor & Francis and the following statement:

* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09500693.2015.1126001

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information please contact:
Leah Maclean, Assistant Marketing Manager, Routledge Education Marketing 
Email: Leah.Maclean@tandf.co.uk

Follow us @tandfnewsroom

, Oxford.

Altmetric launch Badges for Books: new chapter-level insights for thousands of scholarly books

Altmetric launch Badges for Books: new chapter-level insights for thousands of scholarly books

Launching today on Routledge Handbooks Online, Altmetric Badges for Books enables publishers to provide an at-a-glance summary of the online attention a published book and its individual chapters have received.

Now available on content that is identified by ISBN (International Standard Book Number), the distinctive Altmetric donut badges and associated details page provide authors, editors and readers with a real-time record of mentions from mainstream media, public policy documents, online reference managers, blogs, social media, and post-publication peer review platforms.

Designed to be embedded in book and chapter pages on publisher websites and other content-hosting platforms, readers are able to click on the badges to view the Altmetric details page, which provides a collated record of all of the online mentions. The service will launch on the Taylor & Francis Routledge Handbooks Online platform.

Routledge Handbooks Online brings together the world’s leading scholars to provide a cutting-edge overview of classic and current research and future trends in the Social Sciences and Humanities. Covering topics as disparate as archaeology, law, climate change, politics, religion and tourism, the handbooks span an exceptional list of books by many of the greatest thinkers and scholars of the last 100 years.

David Cox, Director of Digital Products at Taylor & Francis, says “Altmetric badges for book content is something I’m really excited about. Users are telling us that traditional scholarly measures of impact are not enough any more, and Badges for Books will mean that we are able to address that need by exposing more of the attention and engagement that content of all types gets. With the display of badges for books and chapters, we believe the users of Routledge Handbooks Online will find it easier to make informed decisions about what to read.”

Altmetric Founder Euan Adie adds “We see the release of Badges for Books as a great opportunity to apply our technology to help authors, editors and readers to more easily discover how a book is being received, to get credit for their work, and to better engage with a wider audience. Imagine a world where you can not only see immediate reactions from readers, but understand how their responses resonate amongst the global community. It’s fascinating.”

Discover Altmetric Badges for Books on Routledge Handbooks Online.

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life. As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information please contact:
Rachel Kemp, Senior Marketing Manager, Taylor & Francis
Email: rachel.kemp@tandf.co.uk

, Oxford.

Mathematical Lyrics: Noteworthy Endeavours in Education

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information, please contact:

Ben Hudson, Taylor & Francis Group

Email: Benjamin.Hudson@tandf.co.uk

Follow us on Twitter @tandfnewsroom

, Oxford.

The New Noah’s Ark: Only the Beautiful Need Apply

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life. As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information please contact:

Deirdre Kilbride
Marketing Executive, Taylor and Francis Journals
Email: Deirdre.Kilbride@tandf.co.uk
Visit our newsroom at: http://newsroom.taylorandfrancisgroup.com/
Follow us on Twitter @tandfnewsroom

, Oxford.

Tweeting your weight loss: is there a link between microblogging and eating disorders?

In a new open access article for Cogent Social Sciences, researchers from Georgia College & State University and Chapman University explore the relationship between social media, eating disorders, and compulsive exercise.

Social media is saturated with messages encouraging people to eat healthily and take plenty of exercise, but these messages can exacerbate the effects of an eating disorder. The study set out to examine different types of online communities and activities, including blogging, microblogging and using mobile apps to monitor diet and exercise.

"Plenty of previous work has documented the ways in which young people can be particularly vulnerable to the effects of media use in this area of body image," said Veronica Hefner, Georgia College & State University, one of the authors of the paper. "But it seems from our study that 'fitspiration' content is specifically related to risky behaviors like compulsive exercise and eating disorder symptoms, especially among those young people who use mobile apps on a frequent basis."

Of interest to researchers, parents, educators, and practitioners, the full study is freely available to read in Cogent Social Sciences.

NOTE TO JOURNALISTS

When referencing the article: Please include Journal title, author, published by Cogent OA and the following statement:

* Read the full article online: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/23311886.2016.1176304

About Cogent OA

Cogent OA is an Open Access publisher of scholarly research committed to offering a truly author-centered service. Our aim is to help researchers share their ideas and discoveries as widely and as effectively as possible.

We offer all the traditional services such as thorough peer review and high quality online presentation, but are adding to these new ideas to help ensure our authors' work has maximum global impact.

As part of Taylor & Francis Group – an Informa business – we are building on solid foundations and maintain the traditional values and high standards of an organization with more than 200 years of experience serving the research community.

For more information, please contact:

Zita Balogh, Head of Marketing – Cogent OA
zita.balogh@CogentOA.com

www.CogentOA.com

, Oxford.

Race and the politics of environmental inequality

How does race come into the equation when siting environmentally hazardous facilities? Much evidence exists to indicate that minority and poor communities bear a disproportionate burden of environmental hazards.

New research by Christopher Mele, published in Environmental Sociology, examines the decision-making process behind the siting of several hazardous facilities within Chester, Pennsylvania in the late 1980s. Chester is notable as a landmark case of environmental inequality due to the large scale siting and construction of hazardous facilities in the city from 1984 to 1996.

The study analyses data ranging from US census reports and first-hand eyewitness testimonies, to local newspaper articles and published minutes from government agency meetings. Mele cites evidence documented in court briefs produced in the landmark legal battle over the cluster construction of waste facilities in Chester.

The study concludes that race was a key factor in the decision-making process behind siting of extensive hazardous facilities at Chester: “The case of Chester reveals how race discourses were formative in a local politics that seemingly pitted the city’s economic development against the county’s solution to its waste disposal problems… [and] issues of race were called upon by political leaders to facilitate popular support among their constituencies.”

Mele suggests the results from the Chester study may not, however, have the potential to be generalised to other urban examples of environmental inequality. He concludes “Because the dynamics of local politics are characteristically unique and not prone to generalization, the analysis of race and facility siting in Chester may not apply to other urban contexts and other environmental issues.”

Follow us on Twitter @Routledge_Socio

NOTE TO JOURNALISTS
When referencing the article: Please include Journal title, author, published by Taylor & Francis and the following statement:

* Read the full article online:http://tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/23251042.2016.1163962

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information, please contact:
Imogen Catling
Marketing Executive, Taylor & Francis Sociology & Law Journals 
Email: imogen.catling@tandf.co.uk

, Oxford.

Fatigue and fracture of wires and cables for biomedical applications

Gbur and Lewandowski, of Case Western Reserve University, have published an extensive review of the fatigue and fracture behavior of wire-based systems used in biomedical applications in International Materials Reviews.

The drive towards minimally invasive surgeries, along with emerging applications in the neurostimulation market and neuroprosthetic technologies, requires materials and architectures with a high level of reliability. Fine wires, strands, cables and coils comprise a variety of implantable devices and tools that play a critical role in the treatment of a large array of medical diagnoses.

For the first time, this comprehensive article offers a discussion and summary of the common materials systems, testing methodologies, fatigue data, modeling and fracture characteristics. This research compiles and plots legacy data in order to allow readers a more convenient method of comparison and to illustrate the variability residing in published works conducted using different testing techniques. The effects of changes in material composition, processing and test conditions on the fatigue and fracture behavior are discussed and recommendations for future work are also provided.

Follow us on Twitter @tandfmaterials

NOTE TO JOURNALISTS
When referencing the article: Please include Journal title, author, published by Taylor & Francis and the following statement:

* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/09506608.2016.1152347

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life. As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information, please contact:

Lauren Harvey, Taylor & Francis Group, Marketing Executive
Email: lauren.harvey@tandf.co.uk
Follow us on Twitter @tandfnewsroom

, Oxford.

Could wearable technology impact our healthcare, fashion, and even sport?

With the rapid proliferation of smart mobile devices, and the subsequent increase in data that is being gathered, the challenge is: how do we harness it?

In this latest research from The Journal of The Textile Institute, Park and Jayaraman explore the impact of modern day wearable technology on data gathering in the 21st Century.

A critical need for the proliferation of wearables for personalized mobile information processing is that they should not impose any additional social, psychological, or ergonomic burden on the individual, and this research suggests that the answer could lie in the clothes we wear, enhanced with technology. In today’s harried world, an individual could well leave a personal electronic device behind one day (say, a smartphone), but is unlikely to walk out of the house without clothes.

Consider the impact this could have on our healthcare system. An individual typically receives four types of care; ambulatory, preventative, chronic, and acute. The data from these four points of care are distinct and fragmented, but wearable technology could be the solution.

Imagine the future: What if a driver’s racing suit captured biometrics such as heart rate, electrocardiogram, body temperature, water loss, and calories burned, enabling them to display this information to their pit crew? And how about if a spectator could physically “experience” the G forces acting on the driver during the race with varying degrees of compression on their body?

Wearable technology, with its integrated sensors and devices, can make this possible, and this latest research gives an in-depth explanation of exactly how and why.

Follow us on Twitter @tandfmaterials

NOTE TO JOURNALISTS
When referencing the article: Please include Journal title, author, published by Taylor & Francis and the following statement:

* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/00405000.2016.1176632

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life. As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information, please contact:

Lauren Harvey, Taylor & Francis Group, Marketing Executive
Email: lauren.harvey@tandf.co.uk
Follow us on Twitter @tandfnewsroom

, Oxford.

What makes a house a home?

At the least a house gives shelter and protection from the elements. At best it is a personal haven for comfort, security and a place to call ‘home’. Exactly how does a house become a home? Rosie Cox’s study in Home Cultures explores property owners’ notions of ‘home’ and their home making journeys and argues that sometimes what is ‘homey’ about a home is its very lack of robustness.

We tend to assume that most people wish for low-maintenance, well insulated robust houses offering reliable protection from the weather, dirt and noise of the outside world. Most of us strive to keep our houses well maintained, to our own taste and reflecting our own style via DIY. Could the DIY process represent more than just upkeep? 

Cox interviewed 30 homeowners from New Zealand about their home improvements: were they DIY or paid for? She explored what motivated their home renovations and the division of labour. Surprisingly, most did not want a perfectly fortress like house but preferred to put their own stamp on it through self-improvements and felt they did not truly ‘own’ it until they had. 

The bond between house and owner was also found to be linked to the fabric of the house, many expressing a preference for more malleable materials such as wood over concrete or steel. A historical dearth of stone dictated many wood constructed houses, which has continued to the present day. One homeowner considered his wood front door ‘a special part of the home’. Despite the extra maintenance it needed, it was warmer and more welcoming than an aluminium or uPVC one and gave great satisfaction to work on it, preserve it, be proud of it and call it home. 

For many New Zealanders, DIY not only harked back to the home building crafts of early settlers but also evoked emotional responses such as cementing family relationships and establishing social identities as well as creating a home. Cox concludes, “This article has illustrated one of the reasons why people may opt for homes that are made of familiar and traditional materials and… has shown how strong their motivations are to do so.… (It) expands the concept of homeyness and invites new ways to think about the relationships between home, housing materials and the identities of home owners.”

Follow us @Routledge_Arch

NOTE TO JOURNALISTS
When referencing the article: Please include Journal title, author, published by Taylor & Francis and the following statement:

* Read the full article online:http://tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17406315.2016.1122966

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life. As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, e-books and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.  From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information please contact:
Steven Turner, Marketing Coordinator
Journals Marketing
email: steven.turner@tandf.co.uk

, Oxford.

YBP Library Services partners with Taylor & Francis to offer e-book titles through GOBI

50,000 e-book titles from Routledge are added to the Humanities and Social Science e-books available in GOBI

E-books from the Taylor & Francis e-books platform are now available through the GOBI acquisition platform from YBP Library Services (YBP). This helps to simplify the complex process of discovery, acquisition model and content management that libraries have to manage when purchasing books.

As a result of the partnership, libraries can efficiently and conveniently use GOBI to select more than 50,000 e-book titles from Routledge, an imprint of Taylor & Francis and the world’s leading academic publisher in the Humanities and Social Science. Like all titles that are available from the Taylor & Francis e-books platform, the Routledge e-book titles are available DRM-free.

GOBI provides access to more than 13 million titles, including more than one million e-books from leading publishers and aggregators, all in one place. GOBI users benefit from duplication control across all formats, full-text reviews and refined selection lists, real-time management reports and more. With the addition of Routledge e-book titles, nearly every major publisher platform is now available in GOBI and can be fully integrated with each other and YBP services. Titles from Routledge, Oxford and its UPSO partners, Cambridge, SAGE Knowledge, De Gruyter and its partners, Project Muse and JSTOR can now be filtered through a single point of delivery and service.
Senior Vice President Mark Kendall says that through GOBI’s sophisticated search and discovery functionality, e-books related to the Humanities and Social Science have never been so easy to manage: “YBP is committed to supporting libraries and the needs of the scholars, instructors and professional communities that use Routledge e-books while employing workflows that save time and money.”

T&F’s US & Canada Library Sales Director Evelyn Elias says, “We are pleased to offer more than 50,000 Routledge e-books - including titles from imprints such as Focal Press, Ashgate and Psychology Press - on YBP’s popular GOBI platform, which is an important step toward streamlining the ordering process and improving workflows for our library customers.”

For more information visit: http://www.tandfebooks.com and http://www.ybp.com

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life. As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information please contact:
Rachel Kemp, Senior Marketing Manager, Taylor & Francis
Email: rachel.kemp@tandf.co.uk