Taylor & Francis Newsroom

, Oxford.

A call to end early starts in education

Study reveals that traditional student start times are damaging learning and health

A study by researchers from the University of Oxford, Harvard Medical School and the University of Nevada, published in Learning, Media and Technology, has found that current school and university start times are damaging the learning and health of students.

Drawing on the latest sleep research, the authors conclude students start times should be 08:30+ at age 10; 10:00+ at 16; and 11:00+ at 18. Implementing these start times should protect students from short sleep duration and chronic sleep deprivation, which are linked to poor learning and health problems.

These findings arise from a deeper understanding of circadian rhythms, better known as the body clock, and the genes associated with regulating this daily cycle every 24 hours. 

It is during adolescence when the disparity between inherent circadian rhythms and the typical working day come about. Circadian rhythms determine our optimum hours of work and concentration, and in adolescence these shift almost 3 hours later. These genetic changes in sleeping patterns were used to determine start times that are designed to optimize learning and health.

The US Department of Health has also recently published an article in favour of changing the start times for Middle and High Schools.

Corresponding author Paul Kelley (Honorary Clinical Research Associate, Sleep and Circadian Neuroscience Institute, University of Oxford) will be presenting Time: the key to really understanding our lives at the British Science Festival on Tuesday 8 September. As the British Science Association’s President of Education this academic year, Kelley will be advising the audience on how our better understanding of our body clock can benefit us all.

The Festival will take place from 7-10 September in Bradford, and provides an opportunity to meet researchers face-to-face and discuss the latest science, technology and engineering.

Space for some events is limited, so book now to reserve your place at www.britishsciencefestival.org.

NOTE TO JOURNALISTS
When referencing the article: Please include Journal title, author, published by Taylor & Francis and the following statement:

* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17439884.2014.942666

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

, Philadelphia.

Announcing the New Editor-in-Chief of AJOB (American Journal of Bioethics) Empirical Bioethics

Taylor & Francis is pleased to announce that Holly Taylor, PhD, MPH will assume the editorship of AJOB (American Journal of Bioethics) Empirical Bioethics beginning with Volume 7, 2016.  Dr. Taylor has been a core faculty member of the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics since 1999. She is also an Associate Professor in the Department of Health Policy and Management at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, where she earned her PhD.  Theo Schall, a staff research coordinator at the Berman Institute, will work with Dr. Taylor as Managing Editor of the journal.


Dr. Taylor has training in both quantitative and qualitative research methods and has used these skills to explore a range of issues in applied research ethics and public health research. Her current research portfolio includes projects on Central IRBs, the role of partners in dementia research; the willingness of US local health department staff to respond to an infectious disease emergency; provision of ancillary care in international public health research; and enhancing cost effective analysis with an assessment of social justice in the context of MDR-TB in Africa.


Dr. Taylor also trains and mentors students pursuing empirical doctoral studies in bioethics and health policy in the Department of Health Policy and Management at the Bloomberg School, and teaches in the Berman Institute of Bioethics intensive-course program. She has consulted on policy related to research oversight, informed consent, and research with children for the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues, the Secretary’s Advisory Committee on Human Research Protections, the Institute of Medicine, the Food and Drug Administration and the Centers for Disease Control. Prior to her career in academia, Dr. Taylor served as a Presidential Management Intern with the Department of Health and Human Services, working on AIDS policy in a variety of settings, followed by two years as Special Assistant to the Director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health.  In 1999, she received a Mentored Scientist Development Award to pursue theoretical and practical aspects of justice in human subject research.


AJOB Empirical Bioethics has put a spotlight on the contributions empirical research makes to the field. I am lucky that the journal has been in such capable hands for the last five years.  Robert ‘Skip’ Nelson and Emily Evans elevated the journal to its current prominence in the field of bioethics,” Taylor says.  “I look forward to working with Theo Schall to shepherd the journal through its next stage of development. I welcome this wonderful opportunity to take on the responsibility of serving as the new editor in chief,” Taylor says.

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

About The American Journal of Bioethics

Every issue of AJOB contains peer-reviewed Target Articles that zero in on tough questions, answered by Open Commentary articles from scholars across disciplines and cultures. The American Journal of Bioethics provides an authoritative, annotated conversation that has been used by judges, Senators, journalists, scholars, schoolteachers, and millions of others as the key source on thousands of topics in the health sciences.

AJOB is the most-widely read journal on bioethics in the world. Hundreds of thousands more readers have discovered bioethics through InFocus articles and other features of bioethics.net. Our readers include faculty and students at virtually every graduate and professional school in the world, thousands of elected officials and judges, and most health news journalists. The American Journal of Bioethics has followed through on the innovative vision that built bioethics: serious discussion of the social implications of biomedicine.

2013 Journal Citations Report® ranks The American Journal of Bioethics 1st out of 50 journals in Ethics, 1st out of 58 journals in History & Philosophy (S), 1st out of 42 journals in History & Philosophy (Ss), 1st out of 42 journals in Social Issues, 1st out of 18 journals in Medical Ethics, 2nd out of 37 journals in Biomedical Social Sciences with an Impact Factor of 3.887
© 2014 Thomson Reuters

Editor-in-Chief: David Magnus, PhD – Stanford University

For more information please contact:

Marisa Starr, Marketing Manager, Journals
Taylor & Francis Journals, Taylor & Francis Group
530 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19106 · 215-606-4206
marisa.starr@taylorandfrancis.com

, Philadelphia.

The 2015 Weatherwise Photo Contest

The results of the highly anticipated 2015 Weatherwise Photo Contest have been released in a recently published issue of the magazine. This article, titled 'The 2015 Photo Contest,' announces one grand prize, one first prize, two second prize, and three third prize winners, along with one honorable mention. The winning weather photos are also displayed in the article, along with a description of the location and weather event.

Weatherwise, a bi-monthly magazine, covers all aspects of weather and climate; ranging from meteorology and climatology, to the relation of weather to technology, history, culture, art, and society. The Photo Contest is one of the most popular annual features of the magazine.

The judges of the 2015 photo contest include Bob Ryan, a research and broadcast meteorologist, Doyle Rice, a USA TODAY weather editor and reporter, and Stanley David Gendzelman, a retired Professor of Atmospheric Sciences at the City College of New York. All winners receive a year-long subscription to the magazine.

The deadline for the 2016 Photo Contest will be June 1st, 2016.

Grand prize winning photograph submitted by Marcus Praznik of El Cerrito, California, USA. A cloud casts a shadow onto the underside of an altocumulus cloud during sunset in Albany, California

NOTE TO JOURNALISTS
When referencing the article: Please include Journal title, author, published by Taylor & Francis and the following statement:

* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00431672.2015.1067107

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.   From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information, please contact
Kylie Dougherty
Science & Technology Journals Marketing Assistant
Taylor & Francis Group
530 Walnut Street, Suite 850
Philadelphia, PA 19106
Tel: (215) 606-4168
Web: www.tandfonline.com
e-mail: kylie.dougherty@taylorandfrancis.com

, Melbourne.

Taylor & Francis and Engineers Australia launch new publishing partnership

Taylor & Francis and Engineers Australia launch new publishing partnership

Taylor & Francis Group and Engineers Australia are pleased to announce a new publishing partnership. Taylor & Francis will now publish and distribute Engineers Australia’s seven technical journals.

Stephen Durkin, Chief Executive Officer of Engineers Australia said “Engineers Australia’s strong commitment to the delivery of technical content and information to members in a contemporary way is a key element of our vision to be the global home of engineering professionals.  Partnering with Taylor & Francis, a market-leading organisation that specialises in technical publishing, is an integral part of our Learned Society and a key element of our vision.  We are delighted to be working with Taylor & Francis and look forward to a long and mutually beneficial partnership.”

Dr David Green, International Publishing Director for Taylor & Francis, added: “We are delighted to enter a publishing partnership with Engineers Australia from 2015 in the publication of their seven journals. These titles are welcome additions both to our global Engineering program, and our ANZ portfolio of more than 100 journals published on behalf of academic societies and institutions across Australasia. Richard Delahunty, Editorial Director for T&F’s engineering journals and Sarah Blatchford, Australasian Regional Director for T&F Journals, noted that the T&F teams were very much looking forward to working with Engineers Australia and its editors, to enhance the visibility and discoverability of their journals in the global arena.

About Engineers Australia

Engineers Australia is the peak body for the engineering profession in Australia representing all disciplines and branches of engineering.  As the trusted voice of the profession, with over 100,000 members and an increasing international footprint, Engineers Australia is taking Australian engineering to the world stage.

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information, please contact:
Dan Hall
Marketing Executive, Taylor & Francis
Email: Daniel.Hall@tandf.co.uk

, Oxford.

Taylor & Francis Editor honoured by water industry at Desalination conference

A recent international conference on desalination and water reuse in Qingdao, China has celebrated the work of Miriam Balaban, Editor-in-Chief and Founder of Desalination and Water Treatment, and her 50 years of working in the field of desalination.

The conference – sponsored by the Chinese government, and jointly supported by many global organisations in the water industry – was attended by over 1000 leaders, specialists and seniors of water industry from more than 50 countries.

Miriam Balaban has served as the secretary general of the European Desalination Society (EDS) since its founding. She edited the journal Desalination for over 40 years, and in 2009 launched Desalination and Water Treatment, where she remains today as Editor-in-Chief.

Image: Miriam Balaban is presented with a Lifetime Achievement award on behalf of the China Desalination Association (CDA) and the Qingdao International Conference on Desalination & Water Reuse. The award was presented by Dr. Guo Youzhi, the Secretary General of the CDA, and Professor Shichang Wang from Tianjin University.

Taylor & Francis would like to offer its congratulations to Miriam and celebrate her outstanding contribution, influence and leadership in the field of desalination over the last 50 years.

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information, please contact:

Ben Hudson, Taylor & Francis Group

Email: Benjamin.Hudson@tandf.co.uk

Follow us on Twitter @tandfnewsroom

, Oxford.

Is lack of guidance on The Sunshine Act hampering publication of clinical trial results?

A research article, published today in Postgraduate Medicine, has concluded that a lack of professional guidance on how to interpret elements of The Physician Payments Sunshine Act (2010) may be having a “chilling effect” on physicians’ desire to participate in clinical trials and publish results.

The Sunshine Act and Medical Publications: Guidance from Professional Medical Associations’ reviews the literature issued by professional associations, with the goal of identifying what guidance has been provided to physicians on the Act and, crucially, on any non-monetary support provided by the pharmaceutical industry to those who write medical publications on licensed drugs. 

The Act, passed in 2010 and recently upheld by the US Supreme Court, legislated for the mandatory reporting of some financial transactions between pharmaceutical companies and licensed physicians, whether direct or indirect payments, also known as transfers of value (TOV). However, the Act was not specific on the interpretation and significance of non-monetary assistance for the development of medical publications. The research published today found only sparse information available from professional associations on this, raising questions such as ‘is provision of editorial support by pharmaceutical companies reportable as TOV?’

Kim Pepitone, senior author of the paper said of their findings,  

I believe we continue to raise more questions than provide answers as to how to interpret the Sunshine Act with respect to reportability of non-monetary support to physician authors. Many companies believe that the support is actually in the other direction; that authors provide important help to companies to interpret and publish their clinical research.

The authors’ conclude such lack of clarity may have led to confusion among physicians who publish, with publications asking for full disclosure but various interpretations of whether this non-monetary aid should be reported to regulatory bodies as a TOV. The authors shine a light on how this grey area may have implications for patients, physicians (whether author or reader) and journal editors alike, and once again raises the importance of financial and non-financial transparency between physician and pharma.

NOTE TO JOURNALISTS
When referencing the article: Please include Journal title, author, published by Taylor & Francis and the following statement:

* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00325481.2015.1084211

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.  From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

Luke Antieul – Marketing Executive, Engineering Journals, Taylor & Francis Group.
Email: luke.antieul@tandf.co.uk
Tel: +44 (0)20 7551 9777

, Oxford.

Using humor to help toddlers learn

We all know that laughter is the best medicine, but a team of French scientists has discovered that using humor also appears to help toddlers learn new tasks, reports a new study in the journal Cognition and Emotion.

Building on the knowledge that making older children laugh can enhance many aspects of cognition, Rana Esseily and her colleagues designed an experiment to see whether using humor could also have an effect on the ability of infants to learn.

Each of the 18-month-olds selected to participate in the final part of the study observed an adult using a tool to grab an out-of-reach toy. In one group the adult simply played with the toy after retrieving it; but in the other group, the adult threw the toy immediately on the floor, which made half the children in that group laugh.

When Esseily and her colleagues studied their data, they found that the children who laughed at the antics of the adults were able to repeat the action themselves more successfully than those who didn’t laugh, as well as those who were included in the ‘humorless’ control group.

Why laughter seems to be related to the toddlers’ ability to learn isn’t entirely clear, but Esseily and her team put forward two possible explanations. The first relates to temperament. “In this case, it is not humor per se that may have facilitated learning,” the authors suggest, “but [that] temperamentally ‘smiley’ babies were more likely to engage with the environment and therefore to attempt and succeed at the task.” It could also be the case that ‘laughing babies’ might have higher social skills or cognitive capacities, allowing them to interact more easily with others and making them more amenable to mimicking the actions of others.

The second explanation the authors put forward relates to brain chemistry. It is well known that positive emotions, like laughter or engaging well with an experimenter, can increase dopamine levels in the brain, which in turn has a positive effect on learning. “Thus, the effect observed here might be a general effect due to positive emotion and not to humor or laughter per se,” they note.

More research needs to be done into the effect of humor on learning, of course, but parents about to embark on the un-funny business of toilet training might want to keep laughing – no matter what.     

NOTE TO JOURNALISTS
When referencing the article: Please include Journal title, author, published by Taylor & Francis and the following statement:

* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/02699931.2015.1036840

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life. As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, e-books and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine. 

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues. 

For more information please contact: 
Claire Thomas, Senior Marketing Executive, Behavioral Science Journals 
email: claire.thomas@tandf.co.uk

, Oxford.

The maths behind surviving a global zombie attack

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information, please contact:

Ben Hudson, Taylor & Francis Group

Email: Benjamin.Hudson@tandf.co.uk

Follow us on Twitter @tandfnewsroom

, Oxford.

Harder, better, stronger: the new alloy with the highest strength-to-weight ratio among metals

A low-density, nanocrystalline high-entropy alloy was produced by mechanical alloying. It formed a single-phase fcc structure during ball milling and transformed to single-phase hcp upon annealing. The alloy has an estimated strength-to-weight ratio that is significantly higher than other nanocrystalline alloys and is comparable to ceramics. as explored in Materials Research Letters.

NOTE TO JOURNALISTS
When referencing the article: Please include Journal title, author, published by Taylor & Francis and the following statement:

* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/21663831.2014.985855

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information, please contact:

Lauren Harvey, Taylor & Francis Group

Email: lauren.harvey@tandf.co.uk

Follow us on Twitter @tandfnewsroom

, Oxford.

The bane of your existence: smartphones and ‘technostress’

The bane of your existence: smartphones and ‘technostress’

If you feel stressed out by your smartphone, it might be down to your personality as well as your phone, a new study suggests.

Writing in the journal Behaviour & Information Technology, Yu-Kang Lee and colleagues explored the relationship between four key personality traits, the types of phones people used and the levels of ‘technostress’ they experienced.

The first trait they studied was ‘locus of control’, which the authors defined as ‘the extent to which people believe that their actions determine their rewards in life’. As smartphones blur the line between home and work, encourage multi-tasking and constant checking, the authors found them unsurprisingly to be a greater source of technostress than traditional phones. ‘This has been called the “helpful-stressful cycle”, in which one purchases a smartphone to help manage the workload only to have it induce stress and become the bane of one’s existence,’ they observe.

The second trait the authors explored was ‘social interaction anxiety’ (SIA). As people with high SIA are more likely to depend on the internet for social networking, they are also more likely to suffer the negative side effects of excessive use including stress caused by repeated smartphone checking and internet addiction.  

The third trait was the ‘need for touch’, which can be satisfied in many people by constantly fiddling with their smartphone touch screens – a problem users of traditional phones don’t have. However, the fact that touching a smartphone becomes almost compelling is yet another source of technostress for their users.

The final trait, materialism, was the only one that seemed to cause more technostress in users of traditional phones than smartphones. The reason why isn’t clear, but the authors suggest that perhaps users of snazzy smartphones have already reached a ‘ceiling’ in terms of their own material desires and therefore how much stress it can cause them.

So we now know that certain personality traits can make people more prone to suffer technostress, and health professionals may be able to identify and treat people who fall victim to technostress. And finally, this new work can also help individual users: the authors recommend that people with high levels of technostress – and the ‘attendant psychological characteristics’ – reduce their mobile usage, which is probably good advice for us all.

Follow us on Twitter @tandfengineer

NOTE TO JOURNALISTS
When referencing the article: Please include Journal title, author, published by Taylor & Francis and the following statement:

* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/0144929X.2015.1055800

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information, please contact:
Dan Hall
Marketing Executive, Taylor & Francis
Email: Daniel.Hall@tandf.co.uk