Taylor & Francis Newsroom

, Oxford.

Connecting the digital divides: technology and cyber policy experts launch new journal

Chatham House and Routledge are launching the Journal of Cyber Policy on 2 July.  To attend the launch please contact the press office at Chatham House (details below).

Fifteen years ago it would be unthinkable for cyber security to top the list of priorities at the annual US-China Security and Economic Dialogue, as it did last week. But, in the intervening years, cyber technologies and the Internet have become fundamental tools for everything from running critical infrastructure such as energy grids and satellite systems, to political, economic and social interactions. Given the pace of change, it should not surprise us that we have barely started to understand how to govern this new order and manage the global Internet in ways that both empower and protect us.

In response, Chatham House and Routledge (part of the Taylor & Francis Group) are launching the Journal of Cyber Policy, addressing a rapidly changing situation and connecting creative, technical and policy experts.

Informing the growing security challenges of an interconnected digital world, this new peer-reviewed journal will provide a valuable resource to decision-makers in the public and private sectors grappling with the challenges of cyber security, online privacy, surveillance and internet access. The journal will offer informed and rigorous thinking, supported by the journal’s internationally renowned editorial board.

“The Journal of Cyber Policy will empower experts with new thinking and diverse ideas delivered in a way which is practically relevant as well as academically rigorous.” Dr Patricia Lewis, Research Director, International Security Department at Chatham House and co-editor of the journal, said. “It will change the game for those working on cyber issues.”

“As the preferred publisher for think tanks around the world, we are proud to be Chatham House’s partner on this new journal, which seeks to address issues that touch upon all our lives on a daily basis.” said Leon Heward-Mills, Global Publishing Director (Journals) at Taylor & Francis Group.

The Journal of Cyber Policy launches on the evening of 2nd July at a reception at Chatham House. To attend the launch please contact the press office at Chatham House (pressoffice@chathamhouse.org).

 

Notes to Editors
Reflecting the global nature of cyber issues, the Journal of Cyber Policy is intent on drawing upon a geographically and culturally diverse set of contributors. The Editorial Board includes:

Subimal Bhattacharjee, independent consultant on defense and cyber security issues, New Delhi (India)

Pablo Bello, Secretary General, Asociación Iberoamericana de Centros de Investigación y Empresas de Telecomunicaciones (AHCIET) [and former Vice Minister of Telecommunciations] (Chile)

Dr Myriam Dunn Cavelty, Lecturer for security studies and senior researcher in the field of risk and resilience at the Center for Security Studies, Zurich (Switzerland)

Prof Richard Dasher, Director, US-Asia Technology Management Center, Stanford University (USA)

Dorothy Gordon, Director-General, Ghana-India Kofi Annan Centre of Excellence in ICT (Ghana)

Alexandra Kulikova, Program Coordinator, Global Internet Governance and International Information Security, PIR Center (Russia)

Dr Victoria Nash, Deputy Director, Oxford Internet Institute (UK)

Prof Motohiro Tsuchiya, Professor, Graduate School of Media and Governance, Keio University (Japan)

Editor, The Journal of Cyber Policy: Caroline Baylon, Chatham House

Co-Editors, The Journal of Cyber Policy: Dr Patricia Lewis and Emily Taylor, Chatham House

Topics for the first issue are as follows:
            
How did we get here?
Cyber crime – the impact so far
How does the internet run and who owns it?
Privacy vs security
Vulnerability and resilience of critical infrastructure
Cyber war is already underway
The next billion online
Cyber security awareness: Are politicians fit for purpose?
Internet of Things

The first two issues of the Journal on Cyber Policy will be published in 2016 and subscriptions to the journal can be placed from August 2015.

About Chatham House
Chatham House, the Royal Institute of International Affairs, is an independent policy institute based in London. It is renowned for open debate, independent analysis and new ideas. Chatham House experts develop new ideas on how best to confront critical international challenges and take advantage of opportunities from the near- to the long-term. Policy recommendations are developed in collaboration with policymakers, experts and stakeholders in each area. Chatham House staff regularly brief government officials, legislators and other decision-makers on their conclusions. 
            
About Taylor & Francis Group
Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.
          
From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

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Contact
Elaine Devine, Communications Manager (Author Relations)
Taylor & Francis Group
elaine.devine@tandf.co.uk
+44 (0)7827 993760

Press Office, Chatham House
pressoffice@chathamhouse.org
+44 (0)20 7314 2739

, Philadelphia.

Are the increasing costs of ‘mega-event’ games preventing host cities from applying?

With the increasing popularity of global mega-events, such as the 2014 World Cup in Brazil and 2014 Winter Games in Sochi, many are beginning to wonder if hosting such a large-scale event is worth it. While these mega-events have been cited as providing an economic boosts to host cities, recently the negative after-effects have been greatly publicized—overpromising of benefits, underestimating costs, and using public resources for private interest. In the end, the building of new infrastructure comes at a significant cost to those in the surrounding communities, in addition to long-term negative effects on both people and the environment.  

As Martin Muller of the University of Zurich writes in the Journal of the American Planning Association (Vol. 81 Issue 1, 2015), money needed for these ventures can now, “command a price of over $10 million,” as well as force the relocation of citizens to accommodate guests. Actions such as those often turn mega-events into obstacles, rather than benefits to urban development. This results in oversized or obsolete infrastructure that the public is forced to pay for. He suggests that a greater focus be placed on the long-term effect of mega-events. In addition to the incremental changes needed to improve the outcome, Muller’s research recommends implementing radical change in how mega-events are “planned, awarded, and governed.”

Mueller’s research advocates for:

·        No longer tying mega-events to large-scale urban development

·        Avoiding higher risks that create cost overruns

·        Event-hosts bargaining with event-governing bodies for better conditions

·        Earmarking and capping public sector contributions

An unforeseen side effect is the recent lack of host cities vying for upcoming mega-events. This includes the 2022 Winter Olympics, where a number of potential hosts either refrained from submitting a bid or withdrew. Muller believes that the best way to reduce a negative outcome is to “avoid cost overruns, inefficient allocation of resources, and oversized infrastructure.” Ultimately research shows that change will not occur without pressure from the public.

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* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/01944363.2015.1038292

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

About The American Journal of Bioethics

Every issue of AJOB contains peer-reviewed Target Articles that zero in on tough questions, answered by Open Commentary articles from scholars across disciplines and cultures. The American Journal of Bioethics provides an authoritative, annotated conversation that has been used by judges, Senators, journalists, scholars, schoolteachers, and millions of others as the key source on thousands of topics in the health sciences.

AJOB is the most-widely read journal on bioethics in the world. Hundreds of thousands more readers have discovered bioethics through InFocus articles and other features of bioethics.net. Our readers include faculty and students at virtually every graduate and professional school in the world, thousands of elected officials and judges, and most health news journalists. The American Journal of Bioethics has followed through on the innovative vision that built bioethics: serious discussion of the social implications of biomedicine.

2013 Journal Citations Report® ranks The American Journal of Bioethics 1st out of 50 journals in Ethics, 1st out of 58 journals in History & Philosophy (S), 1st out of 42 journals in History & Philosophy (Ss), 1st out of 42 journals in Social Issues, 1st out of 18 journals in Medical Ethics, 2nd out of 37 journals in Biomedical Social Sciences with an Impact Factor of 3.887
© 2014 Thomson Reuters

Editor-in-Chief: David Magnus, PhD – Stanford University

For more information please contact:

Marisa Starr, Marketing Manager, Journals
Taylor & Francis Journals, Taylor & Francis Group
530 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19106 · 215-606-4206
marisa.starr@taylorandfrancis.com

, Oxford.

Women’s sport participation and gender equality: African women in the beautiful game

Despite a notably high percentage of women in political positions, South Africa has high rates of rape and domestic violence, suggesting poor gender equality, widespread discrimination and male dominance in (South) Africa. Ogunniyi’s recent research in South African Review of Sociology, examines women’s involvement in sport, specifically football and its impact on balance of gender power in South Africa on National, community and personal levels.

The earliest documented women’s football in Scotland, 1888 was the start of an emergent European trend, but faced resistance to women at competition level due to their being too delicate for the physical demands of the game.  Women in football also presented problematic challenges to the stereotypical woman as homebound caregiver.

There has since been rapid progress with a few significant firsts; women’s UEFA International tournament in 1982, FIFA women’s World Cup in 1991, South African National women’s team in 1993 and sponsored women’s South African League in 2001. This paints a positive picture; sport is known to improve women’s self-esteem, confidence, to challenge gender inequalities through constructive male-female relationships and increase educational opportunities.

However African women broadly are still subject to patriarchy, poverty, sexual and domestic violence and lack of freedom and education. Gender parity in South African politics, with its emphasis on women’s rights has not yet filtered through to the majority of domestic situations.  Will South African Women’s football ease gender inequality?

South African sport undeniably remains a male dominated domain with aggressive undertones; the majority of coaches/decision makers are male. Girls in the region are generally socialised into domestic roles at a young age providing a barrier to female participation. On the other hand, the South African Footballing Association has elected 3 female Executive Committee members and has announced that all National women’s teams will have female coaches, a means for encouragement of increased girls’ participation in the sport. Significant sponsorship has increased coverage and opportunities for women in football and improved legitimacy of the sport and women’s abilities on and off the field. At community level, women and girls are receiving greater access to facilities.

On an individual level, the sport is seeing subtle changes in families and traditional roles, fathers and brothers accepting domestic responsibility to enable female family members to train. Girls’ increased confidence on the pitch has transferred to the classroom and educational opportunities have increased. Could this be an end to the spiral of female poverty, inequality and powerlessness?

Ogunniyi concludes “Large scale alterations to the hegemonic masculinity…do not occur in a short time period. Change takes time and occurs predominantly on an individual and household level with few advances in gender equality transforming the (higher) levels of society…Participation in football has provided opportunities for the females in this study to counteract the dominant masculinities and femininities prevalent in society and sport.”

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* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/21528586.2014.989783

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.   From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information please contact:
Rebecca Bray
Taylor & Francis Journals
Email: rebecca.bray@tandf.co.uk

, Oxford.

New information about stingless bee diversity in El Salvador

Traditional beekeeping using stingless bees originated in the ancient Maya culture. However, this practice has recently declined due to greater use of the more easily managed western honey bee. As a result, there has hitherto been little information available about stingless bees in El Salvador. A new study published today in the Journal of Apicultural Research for the first time provides us with comprehensive information about stingless bee diversity in the country.

Stingless bees (Meliponinae) are a very diverse group of social bees native to areas of the world, (the Americas and Australia) where the more common social Apis honey bees are not naturally found.

In this new study, Dr Carlos Iraheta and colleagues from the University of El Salvador studied bee diversity in each department of the country, the smallest in Central America. They located both wild and managed colonies of stingless bees. Greatly exceeding any previous records, they concluded that at least 20 species of stingless bees are found in the country. They found that the most common wild species was Tetragonisca angustula, known locally as Jetaí, and the most common managed species was Melipona beecheii, known locally as Xunan Kab or the Royal Lady bee.

They found that the stingless bee species richness was associated with the vegetation cover, increasing with increased coniferous forest and fruit trees, also increasing with temperature, but decreasing with altitude. The authors found that coastal areas deforested for agriculture in the 1930s had no stingless bees present, whether wild or managed.

IBRA Science Director Norman Carreck says: “It is clear that populations of stingless bees are often fragile and easily influenced by land use changes. This new paper increases our knowledge of the native stingless bees present in this important country. We can only develop efficient strategies for conserving bee diversity if we have reliable information about present abundance."

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* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00218839.2015.1029783

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

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Caroline Blake, Taylor & Francis Group

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IBRA

IBRA - International Bee Research Association

The International Bee Research Association (“IBRA”) founded in 1949 is the world's longest established apicultural research publishers and promotes the value of bees by providing information on bee science and beekeeping worldwide.

In association with the Taylor & Francis Group, IBRA publishes the peer-reviewed scientific journal the Journal of Apicultural Research, founded by IBRA in 1962. It includes original research articles, theoretical papers; scientific notes and comments; together with authoritative reviews on scientific aspects of the biology, ecology, natural history, conservation and culture of all types of bee. It is published five times a year. The ISI Impact Factor (2013) is 1.363 and the ISI 5-year Impact Factor is 1.662

International Bee Research Association. Company limited by guarantee. Registered in England and Wales. Reg. No. 463819 Registered Office: Hendal House, Hendal Hill, Groombridge, East Sussex, TN3 9NT, UK. Registered Charity No: 209222 Web-site: www.ibra.org.uk Email: mail@ibra.org.uk

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION AND INTERVIEWS PLEASE CONTACT
Norman Carreck, Science Director, IBRA +44 (0)791 8670169 Email: carrecknl@ibra.org.uk

, Oxford.

Researchers design ‘placenta-on-a-chip’ to better understand pregnancy

Researchers design ‘placenta-on-a-chip’ to better understand pregnancy

NIH team and colleagues believe microdevice may improve upon existing placenta models

National Institutes of Health (NIH) researchers and their colleagues have developed a 'placenta-on-a-chip' to study the inner workings of the human placenta and its role in pregnancy. The device was designed to imitate, on a micro-level, the structure and function of the placenta and model the transfer of nutrients from mother to fetus. This prototype is one of the latest in a series of organ-on-a-chip technologies developed to accelerate biomedical advances.

The study, published online in The Journal of Maternal-Fetal & Neonatal Medicine, was conducted by an interdisciplinary team of researchers from the NIH’s Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), the University of Pennsylvania, Wayne State University/Detroit Medical Center, Seoul National University and Asan Medical Center in the Republic of South Korea.

“We believe that this system may be used to address questions which are difficult to answer with the current placenta model systems and serve to enable research in pregnancy and its complications,” said Dr. Romero, Chief of the Perinatology Research Branch of the Division of Intramural Research of NICHD.

The placenta is a temporary organ that develops in pregnancy and is the major interface between mother and fetus. Among its many functions is to serve as a 'crossing guard' for substances traveling between mother and fetus. The placenta helps nutrients and oxygen move to the fetus and helps waste products move away. At the same time, the placenta tries to stop harmful environmental exposures, like bacteria, viruses and certain medications, from reaching the fetus. When the placenta doesn’t function correctly, the health of both mother and baby suffers.

Researchers are trying to learn how the placenta manages all this traffic, transporting some substances and blocking others. This knowledge may one day help clinicians better assess placental health and ultimately improve pregnancy outcome.

However, studying the placenta in humans is challenging: it’s time-consuming, subject to a great deal of variability, and potentially risky for the fetus. For those reasons, previous studies on placental transport have relied in large on animal models and on laboratory-grown human cells. These methods have yielded helpful information, but are limited as to how well they can mimic physiological processes in humans.

The researchers created the placenta-on-a-chip technology to address these challenges, using human cells in a structure that more closely resembles the placenta’s maternal-fetal barrier. The device consists of a semi-permeable membrane between two tiny chambers, one filled with maternal cells derived from a delivered placenta and the other filled with fetal cells derived from an umbilical cord.

After designing the structure of the model, the researchers tested its function by evaluating the transfer of glucose (a substance made by the body when converting carbohydrates to energy) from the maternal compartment to the fetal compartment. The successful transfer of glucose in the device mirrored what occurs in the body.

“The chip may allow us to do experiments more efficiently and at a lower cost than animal studies,” said Dr. Romero “With further improvements, we hope this technology may lead to better understanding of normal placental processes and placental disorders.”

 

**Figure: A placenta-on-a-chip microdevice: A) The device’s upper (blue) and lower (red) chambers are separated by a semi-permeable membrane. B) Researchers placed maternal cells in one chamber and fetal cells in the other. They then added glucose to the maternal-cell chamber and observed how it traveled through the membrane to the fetal-cell chamber.

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* Read the full article online:http://informahealthcare.com/doi/full/10.3109/14767058.2015.1038518

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.   From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information please contact:
Elaine Roberts
Taylor & Francis Journals
Email: elaine.roberts@tandf.co.uk

, Oxford.

Survey reveals the polarized public perceptions of the polar regions

Writing in Polar Geography, Lawrence Hamilton, Senior Fellow at the Carsey School of Public Policy, University of New Hampshire, examines the results of a series of New Hampshire state surveys conducted from 2011 to 2015 that tracked public knowledge of some basic polar facts.  

Hamilton’s analysis indicates that these facts subjectively fall into two categories; those that are, and those that are not directly connected to people’s beliefs about climate change.

Although there is a broad consensus among scientists on the reality of human-caused climate change, this idea remains politically disputed and divisive among US politicians and the public. Indeed, beliefs around climate change correlate so strongly with ideology that some analysts view both as indicators of the same thing.

Hamilton asked five key questions about the poles. How would you respond?

  1. Which of the following three statements do you think is more accurate? Over the past few years, the ice on the Arctic Ocean in late summer – covers less area than it did 30 years ago; declined but then recovered to about the same area it had 30 years ago; or covers more area than it did 30 years ago.
  2. If the Arctic region becomes warmer in the future, do you think that will have – no effects on the weather where you live; minor effects on the weather where you live; or major effects on the weather where you live?
  3. Which of the following possible changes would, if it happened, do the most to raise sea levels? – melting of land ice in Greenland and the Antarctic; melting of glaciers in the Himalaya and Alaska; or melting of sea ice on the Arctic Ocean. 
  4. Which of these best describes the North Pole? – ice a few feet or yards thick, floating over a deep ocean; ice more than a mile thick, over land; or a mainly rocky, mountainous landscape.
  5. Which of these best describes the South Pole? – ice a few feet or yards thick, floating over a deep ocean; ice more than a mile thick, over land; or a mainly rocky, mountainous landscape.

Responses to climate-linked factual questions, such as whether Arctic sea ice area has declined compared with 30 years ago, were politicized as if we were asking for climate-change opinions. Political divisions are less apparent with factual questions that do not infer climate change, such as whether the melting of Greenland and Antarctic land ice, or of Arctic sea ice, could potentially do the most to raise sea levels.

Only 30 percent of respondents answered the sea-level question correctly; Greenland and Antarctic land ice have much greater potential to raise sea level than Arctic sea ice, which is already floating on the ocean. Just 38 percent knew that the North Pole is on thin ice floating above a deep sea; an equal number thought it was on thick ice over land.

At odds with the low levels of factual knowledge, most respondents reported that they had a “moderate amount” or a “great deal” of understanding about climate change, where polar change has been a major area of interest.

A combination of low knowledge and high self-assessed understanding characterizes almost half of the sample, and correlates with political views. The low knowledge/high understanding combination is most prevalent among Tea Party supporters, where it reaches 61 percent. (Democrats, Independents and Republicans appear roughly similar at 41–47 percent). This pattern suggests that their sense of understanding about climate change more often has an ideological basis.

Hamilton concludes by noting that the varied combinations of self-confidence and knowledge found in these surveys suggest that different science-communication strategies are needed to reach different groups; simply providing more information is only likely to work for some people.

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About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

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Alan Crompton, Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group

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, Oxford.

One size doesn’t fit all

Gender and personality differences in cancer-related pain severity for geriatric patients

With 75% of cancer patients in the UK over 60, and the costs of innovative drugs soaring, how to best identify and hopefully manage cancer-related pain in the elderly is a key issue. A new study published in the Journal of Gender Studies looks into this complex matter and, in claiming gender and personality significantly affect the experience of suffering, questions a 'one size fits it all' approach to pain management.

While there is a wealth of literature documenting how gender and temperament impact on our ability to cope with physical discomfort, the way "gender moderates the association between pain and personality" needs to be investigated further, claim the authors of the study. Determined to shed light on this neglected matter, the researchers collected data from a sample of 150 adults (86 women and 64 men above 55 years of age) receiving cancer treatment in Florida (US) in 2011. Their principal objective was to identify gender and character differences – the latter scored against the Five Factor Model of personality – in the reported pain severity amongst participants, as well as establish if psychosocial factors could be predictors of cancer-related pain severity for the group.

After a thorough analysis of the figures collected, significant differences emerged in regards to personality. Females presented significantly higher neuroticism compared to men, and gender was a key ‘predictor of pain severity’, as well as a moderator in the association between the personality trait of neuroticism and average pain severity. Interestingly, while higher anxiety in women was associated with lower reported pain severity, differences in neuroticism between genders could be imputable to social stereotypes too, explain the academics. It’s not a secret that, traditionally, anxious traits are considered more socially acceptable in women than in men. Low extraversion also appeared to be a significant predictor of greater pain severity in women, but not in men, suggesting social roles – women as dependent and less apt to autonomously cope – may weigh on how pain is managed by women. In addition to gender and character traits, psychosocial factors, such as age for women, and education for men, were also identified as strong predictors of pain severity amongst participants, with social status and power balance being crucial components.

In claiming pain severity may be gender-specific, as well as dependent on personality and social-psychological factors, this study warns of the dangers of a ‘one size fits all’ approach and calls for a diversification of clinical procedures to cancer-related pain management in the elderly. In doing so, it greatly contributes to our understanding of the pain experience amongst the elderly.

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* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09589236.2015.1041463

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.   From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information please contact:
Rebecca Bray
Taylor & Francis Journals
Email: rebecca.bray@tandf.co.uk

, Philadelphia.

In an Advanced Placement class? Better take the AP test

Each year over 2 million high school students take over 4 million Advanced Placement (AP) tests in an attempt to earn college credit. The number of AP students in the United States is growing each year, but a new study from Utah Valley University questions the usefulness of AP courses for students who don’t take AP tests.

“There seem to be no academic benefits to students taking AP classes, unless they prepare for and take the corresponding AP test,” says Dr. Russell T. Warne, the leader of the research group. “Some people believe that all students would learn more if they took AP courses, but our study shows that merely sitting in an AP course does not help students academically.”

The article, 'The Impact of Participation in the Advanced Placement Program on Students' College Admissions Test Scores' by Russell T. Warne, Ross Larsen, Braydon Anderson, and  Alyce J. Odasso was part of Utah Valley University’s engaged learning initiative to provide undergraduate students with learning experiences in their major. The Journal of Educational Research published the study, which is freely available online to anyone as an open access article.

The researchers divided high school students into four groups. One group of students had never taken an AP course. The other three groups were students enrolled in AP courses: students who had never taken their course’s AP test, students who took the test but didn’t pass it, and students who took the test and passed it. After controlling for over 70 variables, the researchers found that the non-AP students and the AP students who never took the AP test obtained equal scores on the ACT. Instead, students who took the AP tests earned higher ACT scores—especially if they also passed their course’s AP test. The ACT is a college admissions test like the SAT that measures what students learned in high school.

“Students who didn’t pass the AP test scored about .25 to .50 points higher on the ACT than non-AP students. The students who passed the AP exam scored an additional 1 to 2.8 points higher,” Warne explained. “That may not sound like a lot, but with a grading scale ranging from 1 to 36, a 1- or 2-point boost for some students can mean the difference between getting accepted by their dream college and attending somewhere else.”

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About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

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Emily Matthias - Senior Marketing Associate, Taylor & Francis Group.
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Tel: (215) 606-4238

, Philadelphia.

Kappa Delta Pi wins REVERE award for Kappa Delta Pi Record

Award from Association of American Publishers (AAP) honors Kappa Delta Pi for excellence in educational products.

Kappa Delta Pi International Society in Education is pleased to announce that the Kappa Delta Pi Record was presented an award for Professional Magazines at the REVERE Awards Gala on June 3. The award was given for the 'Telling Stories' department of the journal, which was designed to share universal lessons through personal narratives.

The REVERE (Recognizing Valuable Educational Resources) Awards recognize creative resources that engage 21st century teachers and learners. Produced by the Association of American Publishers (AAP) PreK-12 Learning Group, the awards are the only of their kind to distinguish learning resources in all media, for all ages, and covering a wide array of educational subject areas and learning environments.

“We created the 'Telling Stories' department of the Kappa Delta Pi Record, which is published in partnership with Routledge of Taylor & Francis, more than a decade ago because stories are such a powerful medium,” stated Kathie-Jo Arnoff, Managing Editor and Director of Publications at Kappa Delta Pi. “The personal, heartfelt stories not only relay a memorable message about teaching and learning, but also provide inspiration, help teachers retain key lessons in effective instruction, and balance the quarterly journal’s content on evidence-based teaching strategies, reviews of current policy initiatives, examples of applied theories, and reports of original research.”

The Award was given in the Professional Magazines category, which recognizes newspapers, journals, blogs, podcasts, webcasts and other regularly published media.

“This year’s winners present an impressive slate of learning resources across all educational settings. While it was difficult to choose just one winner in the Professional Magazines category for Editorial Departments, we were excited to present a REVERE Award to the Kappa Delta Pi Record,” said REVERE Awards Judge and Awards committee chairperson, Eric Hamilton, Assistant Director, NCSLET Administration at the American Museum of Natural History.

Award winners were evaluated through in-person events and remote judging by 100 evaluators in the education and publishing industries. Key principles that drove the evaluation of winners were quality content and design, audience engagement and appropriateness, usability and originality and effectiveness along with comments and recommendations given by judges. For a full list of winners, click here. Also visit the Awards Gallery which features 2015 winners and finalists.

Follow or join the conversation about the REVERE Awards on Twitter using @REVEREAwards and #REVEREAwards.

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information, please contact:

Emily Matthias - Senior Marketing Associate, Taylor & Francis Group.
Email: emily.matthias@taylorandfrancis.com
Tel: (215) 606-4238

, Oxford.

Anxiety about terrorism: do scapegoating and revenge offer resolution?

After 9/11 US national security was high on the agenda, and people were fearful; 72% of US citizens reporting anxiety over perceived imminent attacks. Later bombings in Madrid and London and the rise of al Qaeda from centralised group to ‘amorphous’ network added to the collective disquiet. In her recent article in Critical Studies on Security, Caron Gentry explores the role of anxiety in society, politics, counter-terrorism and the construction of Western self vs. radical Islamist ‘other’.

Anxiety: an emotion which can split or unify society to form ‘insider’ and ‘outsider’ groups signifying ‘self’ and ‘other’. Post-9/11, emotions ran high and political anxiety began ‘the global economy of fear’ and a notion of liberal progressive West vs. radical irrational Muslim terrorist. In the war on terror, radical Islamists became the object of blame; scapegoats on whom to reap justifiable and violent revenge.

The ultimate ‘other’ was Osama bin Laden, a ‘master terrorist’ epitomising the ‘known unknown’ intangible threat of al Qaeda; a terrorist net underlined by religion posing big challenges to national security. Desire for vengeance, justice and a resolution to anxiety was all placed on his head but after his assassination and victorious celebrations, anxiety persists and the threat from an evasive enemy remains. 

The enduring image of a ‘terrorist’ conjures instant parallels to fanatical Muslims, fundamentalism and jihad. Anxieties over high risk in the face of an unquantifiable threat have influenced government into pro Neo-Orientalist aggressive strategies.  The assassination of bin Laden signified anxiety driven revenge but was futile in arresting further acts of terror. To conclude, Gentry refers to the philosophy of Levinas, “terrorism must be conscientiously dealt with – not reacted to. Levinas’ liturgy ends (the useless) retaliation and revenge by asking for a different conceptualization of a powerful self and a re-humanizing of the scapegoated Muslim other.”

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* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/21624887.2015.1027600

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life. As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, e-books and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.  From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information please contact:
Joseph Couchman, Marketing Executive
Journals Marketing
email: joseph.couchman@tandf.co.uk