Taylor & Francis Newsroom

, Philadelphia.

Western diet increases Alzheimer’s risk

Globally, about 42 million people now have dementia, with Alzheimer’s disease as the most common type of dementia. Rates of Alzheimer’s disease are rising worldwide. The most important risk factors seem to be linked to diet, especially the consumption of meat, sweets, and high-fat dairy products that characterize a Western Diet. For example, when Japan made the nutritional transition from the traditional Japanese diet to the Western diet, Alzheimer’s disease rates rose from 1% in 1985 to 7% in 2008, with rates lagging the nutrition transition by 20-25 years. The evidence of these risk factors, which come from ecological and observational studies, also shows that fruits, vegetables, grains, low-fat dairy products, legumes, and fish are associated with reduced risk. “Using Multicountry Ecological and Observational Studies to Determine Dietary Risk Factors for Alzheimer's Disease,” a review article from the Journal of the American College of Nutrition presents the data.

In addition to reviewing the journal literature, a new ecological study was conducted using Alzheimer’s disease prevalence from 10 countries (Brazil, Chile, Cuba, Egypt, India, Mongolia, Nigeria, Republic of Korea, Sri Lanka, and the United States) along with dietary supply data 5, 10, and 15 years before the prevalence data. Dietary supply of meat or animal products (minus milk) 5 years before Alzheimer’s disease prevalence had the highest correlations with Alzheimer’s disease prevalence in this study. The study discussed the specific risk each country and region faces for developing Alzheimer’s disease based on their associated dietary habits.

Residents of the United States seem to be at particular risk, with each person in the U.S. having about a 4% chance of developing Alzheimer’s disease, likely due in part to the Western dietary pattern, which tends to include a large amount of meat consumption. The author, William B. Grant, states, “reducing meat consumption could significantly reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s disease as well as of several cancers, diabetes mellitus type 2, stroke, and, likely, chronic kidney disease.”

He concludes, “Mounting evidence from ecological and observational studies, as well as studies of mechanisms, indicates that the Western dietary pattern -- especially the large amount of meat in that diet -- is strongly associated with risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease and several other chronic diseases. Although the traditional Mediterranean diet is associated with about half the risk for Alzheimer’s disease of the Western diet, the traditional diets of countries such as India, Japan, and Nigeria, with very low meat consumption, are associated with an additional 50% reduction in risk of Alzheimer’s disease.”

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* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/07315724.2016.1161566

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.   From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information please contact:
Samantha Puleo
Journals Marketing Assistant
Email: Samantha.Puleo@taylorandfrancis.com

, Philadelphia.

Concussions and brain injury - can omega-3 intake aid in brain health recovery?

The treatment of concussions and traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a clinical challenge. Clinical studies thus far have failed to identify an effective treatment strategy when a combination of targets controlling aspects of neuroprotection, neuroinflammation, and neuroregeneration is needed.  According to emerging science and clinical experience, aggressive intake of omega-3 fatty acids (n-3FA) seems to be beneficial to TBI, concussion, and post-concussion syndrome patients. This research is presented in "Concussions, Traumatic Brain Injury, and the Innovative Use of Omega-3s", a review article from the Journal of the American College of Nutrition, official publication of the American College of Nutrition.

Research suggests that early and optimal doses of omega-3 fatty acids (n-3FA) have the potential to improve outcomes from traumatic brain injury. The article reviews preclinical research and cites three brain injury case studies that resulted from a mining accident, a motor vehicle accident, and a drowning accident. Each instance showcased evidence of safety and tolerability, wherein the patients who sustained life-threatening brain injuries recovered brain health with the aid of omega-3 fatty acids (n-3FA).

Growing clinical experience by numerous providers is that the brain needs to be saturated with high doses of n-3FA in order for the brain to have the opportunity to heal. Without an optimal supply of omegas, healing is less likely to happen. It is well recognized that n-3FAs are not a drug and not a cure and every situation is different. Clinically, some patients respond better than others. However, there is no downside to providing optimal levels of nutrition in order to give a patient the best opportunity to regain as much function as possible following a TBI.

NOTE TO JOURNALISTS
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* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/07315724.2016.1150796

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.   From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information please contact:
Samantha Puleo
Journals Marketing Assistant
Email: Samantha.Puleo@taylorandfrancis.com

, Oxford.

Education not to blame for increasing childlessness in Europe

The increasing proportion of the population who prefer to remain childless is a major social problem for many European countries. However this trend has not (so far) been the result of the expansion of education. This is the conclusion of new research, published in the journal Population Studies.

The researchers, Eva Beaujouan, Zuzanna Brzozowska and Kryštof Zeman of the Vienna Institute of Demography, looked at trends in childlessness among women born in the period 1916-65 in 13 European countries. They found that after the baby boom that followed the Second World War, the proportion of women who remained childless rose continuously in Western Europe. In the state-socialist countries the proportion started to rise after the end of the Communist era. Initially, there was a difference in the proportion who were childless between the least educated and those who held a secondary school diploma, but the difference gradually disappeared as most women became diploma-holders. That largely explains why the expansion of education did not affect overall childlessness levels.

For the period covered by the study, women graduates were always much more likely than other educational groups to remain childless, but until recently the proportion of women who were graduates was too low to affect the overall level of childlessness. The recent massive increases in this proportion may have a more general effect. On the other hand, it is possible that as the proportion grows, the level of childlessness among women graduates will decline towards that of less educated women.

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* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00324728.2016.1206210

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.   From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information please contact:
Mark Robinson
Taylor & Francis Journals
Email: mark.robinson@tandf.co.uk

, Oxford.

Do the tools to quantify addiction help to define it?

Understanding what counts as an addiction, and what can be done to address it is the work of researchers across many disciplines. But what tools are used to ‘measure’ addiction, and are these capable of legitimising an addiction or improving our knowledge of it?

These are the questions being addressed by a team of researchers based at the Australian National Drug Research Institute, Curtin University, Australia, who have analysed the tools used to identify substance abuse and addiction to understand how they contribute to or stabilise the realities of addiction.

The researchers, Dr Robyn Dwyer and Dr Suzanne Fraser, writing in the journal Health Sociology Review, identify five key processes by which the tools used to screen or diagnose addiction which help to establish, standardise and normalise an addiction within an individual. They conclude that some of the tools may contribute to establishing an addiction, and suggest further research into the choice of tools used.

Dwyer and Fraser identify five key processes by which these tools can be analysed and considered to establish or standardise an addiction; reduction, expression, quantification, normalisation and populationisation.

They believe that through these processes more and more individuals can be considered ‘addicted’, thereby inflating assumed rates of addiction, or that tools can be applied without discrimination to individuals, reinforcing assumptions about the scale and character of addiction and shaping individual experiences of addiction.

By using this analysis to identify such limitations and characteristics of the tools used to define an addiction, the researchers do not intend to suggest that a perfect catch-all tool could be developed allowing a perfect window into the reality of an individual’s addiction. However, they do hope that by questioning how knowledge of addiction is gained, better or different ways of understanding it might be obtained.

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* Read the full article online:http://tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/14461242.2016.1184581

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information, please contact:
Imogen Catling
Marketing Executive, Taylor & Francis Sociology & Law Journals 
Email: imogen.catling@tandf.co.uk

, Oxford.

Fighting the stigma of albinism

People with albinism face major health problems, including skin cancer, involuntary eye movements, and poor eyesight. According to a new study in the journal Anthropology & Medicine, many of them also suffer severe discrimination and social stigmatization.

To understand just what they go through, Giorgio Brocco of the Freie Universität Berlin spoke with several people with albinism in Tanzania, a country with a much higher than average prevalence. Worldwide the condition affects roughly 1 in 20,000 people, but in Tanzania, that figure is 1 in 1429.

Brocco writes: “The majority of people with albinism in Tanzania live in marginalized social conditions and a state of economic vulnerability because, apart from having a different physical appearance and suffering from visual impairments, they cannot actively take part in agrarian work due to their sensitivity to the sun, and this effectively excludes them from engaging in the major productive activity in most rural areas.”

In the north west of the country, many people with albinism have suffered an even worse fate than poverty. In the mid to late 2000s, some so called ‘traditional healers’ and a small group of criminals, began to target people with albinism in order to kill them and use their bones and blood to make good-luck charms.

Pressure from the UN and the EU in response to the killings raised public awareness and led the Tanzanian government to take action. International NGOs and the broadcast media now play a large part in trying to raise the standard of living for those affected by the condition, principally by fighting stigma through education. 

Brocco’s informants are open about the issues they have faced. One struggled in business, because no one in her village would buy food or drinks touched by a person with albinism; another’s husband threatened to sell her body to traditional doctors for ‘a huge amount of money’; still others have struggled to find suitable work or education, making daily life a struggle.

Despite his focus solely on Tanzania, Brocco’s study illustrates the effect that family ties, globalization and religion can have on the lives of people with albinism worldwide. Albinism, like other illnesses, diseases and other congenital conditions, can make people more vulnerable and affect their social and economic status. But there is hope. Religious views which see the condition as simply ‘God’s will’ coupled with the work of charities towards normalizing the condition and family/social support can help people with albinism develop their own sense of identity, overcome the stigma and lead normal lives.

NOTE TO JOURNALISTS
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* Read the full article online:http://tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13648470.2016.1184009

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.  From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

Luke Antieul – Marketing Executive, Engineering Journals, Taylor & Francis Group.
Email: luke.antieul@tandf.co.uk
Tel: +44 (0)20 7551 9777

, Oxford.

China’s honey bee losses are low compared with West

Since concern about widespread honey bee colony losses began ten years ago, there have been surveys carried out to assess winter losses in North America and many European countries. So far, the picture in China, the largest beekeeping country in the world, has been unclear. Now for the first time, information about winter losses from a large-scale survey carried out from 2010-13 has been published.

In a new paper published in Journal of Apicultural Research, Zhiguang Liu and Wei Shi from the Institute of Apicultural Research, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing and colleagues, report on a three-year survey using standard questionnaires developed by the international COLOSS Association. In total, they received 3,090 responses, including 485 from part-time beekeepers, 2,216 from sideline beekeepers, and 389 from commercial beekeepers. Between them these beekeepers managed some 140,000 colonies, that is about 2.4 % of China’s six million colonies.

The results showed that colony losses were generally low (on average 10.1%), compared to published results from Europe and the USA. There were however variations between years (ranging from 8.5 to 12.0 %), between provinces (ranging from 2.5 to 19.0%), and between different sizes of beekeeping operation (ranging from 7.6 to 12.1%).

The authors speculate that reasons for the lower losses compared to those of other countries may be due to a high genetic diversity in their honey bees, regular replacement of queen bees by the beekeepers, and because the average size of beekeeping operation is small, meaning that beekeepers can pay close attention to their hives, in particular to the way they control the parasitic varroa mite. The authors also discuss why losses may be consistently higher in certain regions.

IBRA Science Director Norman Carreck says: “For the first time we now have a good picture of honey bee colony losses in China, the world’s biggest beekeeping country. Further studies of why losses there appear to be relatively low may assist our understanding of widespread colony losses elsewhere”.

NOTE TO JOURNALISTS
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* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00218839.2016.1193375

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life. As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information please contact:

Deirdre Kilbride
Marketing Executive, Taylor and Francis Journals
Email: Deirdre.Kilbride@tandf.co.uk
Visit our newsroom at: http://newsroom.taylorandfrancisgroup.com/
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About the International Bee Research Association

IBRA

The International Bee Research Association (IBRA) founded in 1949 is the world's longest established apicultural research publisher and promotes the value of bees by providing information on bee science and beekeeping worldwide. IBRA publishes and sells books on bee science, bee conservation and beekeeping and also provides bee information services.  IBRA is a Registered Charity, and its Council of Trustees boasts some of the world’s leading bee scientists.

For more information please contact:

Norman Carreck, Science Director, IBRA 

+44 (0)791 8670169

Email: carrecknl@ibra.org.uk

, Oxford.

How do we become who we are?

What might it feel like to be born? What does ‘I love you’ really mean? Why do we repeat the patterns of our parents’ and grandparents’ lives without realising it? The Stages of Life provides the ‘big picture’ of the human lifespan that is often missing in developmental psychology courses. The author explores how our personalities evolve in response to both genetic and social influences, how and why individuals differ, and how some problems tend to develop at particular stages of the life course.

“My hope in writing this book” states the author, Hugh Crago, an Adjunct Fellow in the School of Social Sciences and Psychology at Western Sydney University “was to address the experience of life’s stages ‘from the inside’, rather than simply describing them from the outside."

Exploring the theories and research findings that have helped explain the complexities of human personality and human relational problems, The Stages of Life shows how some genetically-linked traits are often ‘bundled’ together. These traits of fearfulness, sensitivity and reactivity produce children and adults who are more at risk of encountering problems during their life course. Featuring examples from the lives of composer Joseph Haydn, artist Vincent van Gogh and novelists Charles Dickens and the Brontës, Crago illustrates how ‘thin-skinned’ individuals may be more creative, empathic and original than their ‘thicker skinned’ peers.

“Human development becomes vivid and memorable when we see it playing out in individual lives and in history.” explains Hugh. “How did Margaret Thatcher become ‘the iron lady’? Was Patton really the tough, aggressive soldier he seemed? Why did Enid Blyton do to her own children what her mother had done to her? These are the questions that I answer.”

Academic and general readers will find that The Stages of Life illuminates puzzles in their own lives and opens a road to understanding and acceptance of both themselves and others.

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.   From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information please contact:
Natalie Turner
Associate Marketing Manager
Email: natalie.turner@tandf.co.uk

Follow us on Twitter @routledgepsych

, Philadelphia.

NCSL International and Taylor & Francis begin partnership in 2016

Taylor & Francis and the NCSL International (established in 1961 as the National Conference on Standards Laboratories) are pleased to announce their new partnership from 2016 to publish the Society’s prestigious journal NCSLI Measure. The NCSLI is an organization serving the world of measurement, promoting cooperative efforts for solving the common problems faced by measurement laboratories. NCSLI Measure is a scholarly journal, recognized as one of the leading journals in measurement science, and has been publishing primary and secondary measurement standards and techniques quarterly since 2006.

Taylor & Francis supports the mission of the NCSL International, and this partnership demonstrates our shared commitment to laboratory standards and establishing metrology standards which can be recognized internationally and across disciplines, ensuring quality in research. Both Taylor & Francis’s science team and NCSL International’s editorial team are excited to be working together on the ambitious plans they have developed for the journal’s future.

Hy D. Tran, PhD, PE, Editor-in-Chief of NCSLI Measure, comments, “There are many benefits to NCSLI and to Taylor & Francis’s new partnership. NCSLI is the leading organization for calibration laboratories, which spans not only the scientific metrology community, but also the business side of metrology and the metrology practitioner. Taylor & Francis, as a leading science and engineering publisher, helps us with not only the production workflow but also with providing the larger community with the awareness of how pervasive good metrology is in science, business, and society.”

Anthony F. Trioli, Editorial Director of US Science, Technology, and Medicine Journals at Taylor & Francis, adds, “We are extremely proud and excited to enter this publishing partnership with NCSL International. NCSLI Measure is a well-respected journal in the field of metrology, and will be a flagship publication in our program. We look forward to working closely with the NCSL International Board of Directors and Measure Editorial team to help support its mission and further grow its reputation among the measurement science community.”

The first issue of NSCLI Measure published by Taylor & Francis is available now (and is free to access) at www.tandfonline.com/ujms.

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.   From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information please contact: 
Amanda Patterson 
Journals Marketing Associate 
Email: amanda.patterson@taylorandfrancis.com

Follow us on Twitter @tandfnewsroom

, Philadelphia.

TerraPop: Changing the way we manage geospatial data

The Journal of Map & Geography Libraries is pleased to announce the winner of the 2016 Best Paper Award: “Terra Populus: Workflows for Integrating and Harmonizing Geospatial Population and Environmental Data,” by Tracy A. Kugler, David C. Van Riper, Steven M. Manson, David A. Haynes II, Joshua Donato, and Katie Stinebaugh.

Researchers in sociology, geography, history, economics, ecology, forestry, food systems, computer science, and public health alike all rely on spatially detailed, multidecadal data sets to understand changes to the earth's social and ecological systems. Managing, curating, and preserving the data necessary for understanding complex human-environment interactions present a number of challenges. That’s where TerraPop comes in. In the words of the authors, “The goal of TerraPop is to enable research, learning, and policy analysis by providing integrated spatiotemporal data describing people and their environment.”

The paper describes TerraPop's collection strategies, details the geospatial workflows involved in preparing data for ingest into the project database and those used to transform data across formats for dissemination, and discusses the system used to capture and manage provenance metadata throughout the project. A key aspect of the project is the development of global current and historical administrative unit boundaries that can be linked to census data.

The Journal of Map and Geography Libraries’ Best Paper Award is presented annually to the best paper published in the previous year. The evaluation criteria for the award are the papers’ quality of research and writing, interest in the topic by current and future readers, and the likely influence of the article on future research.

NOTE TO JOURNALISTS
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* Read the full article online:http://tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/15420353.2015.1036484

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.   From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.  For more information please contact:

Tara Golebiewski, Journals Marketing Associate

email: tara.golebiewski@taylorandfrancis.com

, Oxford.

Simple, streamlined peer review: Taylor & Francis announce new trial with Peerage of Science

Taylor and Francis today announce a new trial with Peerage of Science, offering a simpler, transparent peer review process across its portfolio of Botany, Ecology and Zoology journals.

Peerage of Science is now available across 30 journals within this portfolio, including the Journal of Natural History, International Journal of Acarology, and Climate and Development. The journals included in the initiative will enjoy more efficient publishing process, enabling peer review of articles prior to authors submitting to a specific journal. It encourages greater transparency, with submitted articles being made instantly available for review to any of the qualified registered peers. Peer reviews are also themselves reviewed, increasing and quantifying the quality of the overall process.

Peerage of Science was created for researchers by researchers, facilitating greater engagement between authors and journal editors. Authors can submit their manuscript to the service, set their own deadlines for review, and track its progress. Once peer review is complete, the service enables both authors to choose which journal best suits their manuscript, and editors to select articles they feel are suitable for their journal. 

The resource aims to speed up the whole publishing process, provide consistent, rigorous and fair reviewing practice, while continuing to offer authors and journal editors the freedom to choice of where and what to publish.

"In the brief history of the Peerage of Science, the addition of 30 new direct destinations with full editorial access at once is the largest single expansion to date”, says Janne-Tuomas Seppänen, Co-Founder and Managing Director of Peerage of Science. “I am excited to launch a collaboration with Taylor & Francis with this milestone, and see tremendous potential for more in the future. Also, I am particularly happy to welcome the editors of so many highly specialized high-quality journals into Peerage of Science, in several subject areas that together cover a large portion of our current community. I know many scientists prefer to publish their research in outlets just like these, curated specifically for and by their own core international research communities. With this expansion, the ‘just right’ destination journal is directly available for so many more articles, making Peerage of Science that much more useful for the scientific community."

Deborah Kahn, Editorial Director, Taylor & Francis commented, “I am delighted that Taylor & Francis are partnering with Peerage of Science. Their excellent and innovative peer review services will be welcomed by authors and editors across our journals portfolio in biology, ecology and natural history”.

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information please contact:
Jodie Bell, Communications Manager (Media Relations)
email: jodie.bell@tandf.co.uk

Follow us on Twitter: @tandfnewsroom