Taylor & Francis Newsroom

, Oxford.

A spoonful of sugar? Swapping sugary drinks for water and dairy seems the best medicine.

New research by Andersen et al, published in the International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition, may have an impact on the sugar tax debate.  The research team observed overall changes in dietary patterns in overweight children, including a decrease in consumption of sugary drinks, when additional water or milk is added to their diet.  

Since 2011 the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition has recommended plain water as the best source of fluid for children, to promote fullness, reduce calorie intake and subsequently stabilise weight. Until now though, little evidence has proven the link between children’s choice of beverage, dietary habits and weight. Using a sample of 173 overweight Danish adolescents, Andersen et al explored the effect of providing 1 l/d of either water or milk over a 12 week period on the overall diet. They studied effects on calories, nutrients, food types and general dietary patterns. The children were encouraged to eat without restraint during the study, except for the addition of the test drink. Would the addition of milk or water have a favourable effect on participants’ health?

The results showed participants recorded on average a lower intake of food per kilogram of body weight during the trial. Furthermore, consumption of convenience foods, notably sugary drinks, was significantly lower in both water and milk study groups. The water group showed a decrease in calories consumed during the intervention. This might be a positive step towards maintaining a healthy diet and maybe also a healthy weight. The authors note The main strength of this study is the…inclusion of the whole dietary approach of well measured foods and dietary patterns ... Moreover, the investigation was designed with no restriction of diet ... This imitates how dietary changes may be adapted into usual life and supports free-living behaviour, which increases the interpretation of results in relation to public health.”

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* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.3109/09637486.2016.1150435

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

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Caroline Blake, Taylor & Francis Group

Email: caroline.blake@tandf.co.uk

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, Philadelphia.

Article exploring memories of sport in childhood wins SHAPE America Research Council’s 2015 Writing Award

SHAPE America's Research Council Writing Award Committee has announced that the article 'I just remember rugby': Re-membering Physical Education as More Than a Sport has been selected from the 86th volume of Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport (RQES) as the winner of the Research Council's 2015 Writing Award. This award is designed to identify outstanding contributions of scholarship from papers published in each volume of the RQES. The article's authors, Ashley Casey and Mikael Quennerstedt, were presented with the award during the Annual C.H. McCloy Research Lecture and Breakfast on April 7 during the SHAPE America National Convention & Expo in Minneapolis, MN.

Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport publishes research in the art and science of human movement that contributes significantly to the knowledge base of the field as new information, reviews, substantiation or contradiction of previous findings, development of theory, or as application of new or improved techniques. The goals of RQES are to provide a scholarly outlet for knowledge that: contributes to the study of human movement, particularly its cross-disciplinary and interdisciplinary nature; impacts theory and practice regarding human movement; stimulates research about human movement; and provides theoretical reviews and tutorials related to the study of human movement.

Routledge is proud to partner in publishing with SHAPE America, the largest organization of professionals involved in physical education, physical activity, dance and school-based health education. Explore the complete collection of SHAPE America titles and learn more about the organization at shapeamerica.tandfonline.com

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* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/02701367.2014.977430

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

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Emily Matthias - Senior Marketing Associate, Taylor & Francis Group.
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Tel: (215) 606-4238

, Oxford.

‘The end of western civilization’? Trump, Clinton, and the 2016 presidential election

In a new article from The Israel Journal of Foreign Affairs, author and former Director of the Center for Culture and Security at the Institute of World Politics, Dr. Juliana Geran Pilon, gives a frank assessment of the state of US politics and finds a cause for concern.

Publishing within IJFA, the official publication of the Israel Council on Foreign Relations (ICFR), she describes a presidential campaign that ‘unfolds embarrassingly’ before an increasingly troubled global populace, and reminds readers that though Trump may be the campaign’s worst spectacle, Hillary Clinton too has left many questions unanswered, both to the public, and the FBI.

Dr. Pilon goes on to suggest that both candidates are in fact the product of an immense "civilizational angst", the result of years of undelivered promises sold under the "vacuous" mantra of "change". She states that though both Clinton and Trump claim to be able to deliver a better future, in fact their campaigns are not "about the message". She depicts their politics instead as being based on a ‘virulent form of know nothingism’ that is close to nihilism. 

She describes a "mercenary media" that is "subversively misleading" the public, and academics that sit back and "opine in academese". However, they are not the only ones to whom Dr. Pilon attributes blame. The threat of global jihadism has in her view altered the "rational calculus", and the perceived weakness of Obama has left worried US citizens vulnerable to Trump’s perpetual vow to "make America great again".

Dr. Pilon’s article offers a unique perspective on modern US politics, providing rational explanations for what is arguably the most irrational election campaign in recent American history.

The Unbearable Lightness of America's 2016 Presidential Campaign
Juliana Geran Pilon
The Israel Journal of Foreign Affairs

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About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.   From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

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Mel Phillips, Marketing Executive
Taylor & Francis Journals
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, Philadelphia.

Synthetic cannabinoids versus natural marijuana: a comparison of expectations

An article entitled 'Comparison of Outcome Expectancies for Synthetic Cannabinoids and Botanical Marijuana,' from The American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse, studied the expected outcomes of both synthetic and natural marijuana.

186 adults who had previously used both synthetic and natural marijuana, as well as 181 who had previously used only botanical marijuana, were surveyed about their expected outcomes of using either type of cannabinoid. The results showed that the expected negative effects were significantly higher for synthetic marijuana than for natural marijuana across both categories of use history.

Despite the more commonly expected negative effects of synthetic cannabinoids, the most cited reasons for using these compounds were wider availability, avoiding a positive drug test, curiosity, perceived legality, and cost.

Authors concluded, “Given growing public acceptance of recreational and medical marijuana, coupled with negative perceptions and increasing regulation of synthetic cannabinoid compounds, botanical marijuana is likely to remain more available and more popular than synthetic cannabinoids.”

About The American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse
The American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse is an international journal published six times per year and provides an important and stimulating venue for the exchange of ideas between the researchers working in diverse areas, including public policy, epidemiology, neurobiology, and the treatment of addictive disorders. The journal includes a wide range of translational research, covering preclinical and clinical aspects of the field. The Journal covers these topics with focused data presentations and authoritative reviews of timely developments in our field. Manuscripts exploring addictions other than substance use disorders are encouraged. Reviews and Perspectives of emerging fields are given priority consideration.

2015 Journal Citation Reports® ranks The American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse 53rd out of 119 journals in Psychology, Clinical (Social Sciences) and 16th out of 36 journals in Substance Abuse (Social Sciences) with a 2014 Impact Factor of 1.799 and a 5-year Impact Factor of 2.096
© 2015 Thomson Reuters, 2014 Journal Citation Reports®

Editor in Chief: Bryon Adinoff, VA North Texas Health Care System, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center
Print ISSN: 0095-2990  ̶  Online ISSN: 1097-9891   ̶  6 issues per year

For more information please contact:
Caitlin O’Malley, Journals Marketing Associate
Taylor & Francis, 530 Walnut Street, Suite 850, Philadelphia, PA 19106, Tel: 215.606.4341
Email: Caitlin.O’Malley@taylorandfrancis.com

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* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.3109/00952990.2015.1135158

, Oxford.

Too much self-confidence can lead to foreign policy fiascos for Prime Ministers

Finding someone to blame for policy fiascos is part of politics, but a new study of British Prime Ministers suggests that many of them should be pointing the finger squarely at themselves.

Klaus Brummer studied the personality traits and political beliefs of 13 British Prime Ministers to determine the importance of individual decision makers – rather than other factors – in the context of foreign policy fiascos. In particular, he wanted to know whether those PMs who had disasters happen on their watch had different personality traits and beliefs from those who didn’t – and how those traits and beliefs might have contributed.

As he explains in the Journal of European Public Policy: “The idea is that ‘extreme’ manifestations of individual idiosyncrasies, relating to personality traits and/or political beliefs, increase the likelihood of decision-makers to engage in low-quality decision-making processes that in turn increase the likelihood of ending up with policy fiascos as outcomes.”

Brummer assigned six PMs to his foreign policy ‘fiasco’ group (Chamberlain [Appeasement], Eden [Suez], Macmillan and Wilson [EEC], Major [ERM], Blair [Iraq]). To his ‘non-fiasco’ group he assigned seven: Churchill, Attlee, Heath, Callaghan, Thatcher, Brown and Cameron. For his data, Brummer coded and studied almost 370,000 words of political speech, including Hansard and transcripts of interviews, noting seven leadership traits and leaders’ beliefs about the nature and actions of politics.

Brummer’s instincts were right. His results suggest that ‘fiasco’ leaders do exhibit extreme versions of certain personality traits which set them apart from ‘non-fiasco’ PMs, and, as it happens, other world leaders. Specifically, ‘fiasco’ PMs appear to have less need for power and a lower ‘task orientation’ than ‘non-fiasco’ PMs; they also show a significantly higher levels of self-confidence.

“Maybe fiascos are the result of a lack of individual leadership exhibited by prime ministers who fail to provide direction to their decision group (owing to a low need for power) and refrain from changing their approach (owing to high self-confidence),” he suggests.

Brummer’s study also suggests that ‘fiasco’ PMs have a ‘gloomier perception of the political universe’ and follow a more ‘conflictual approach to politics’ than ‘non-fiasco’ PMs, which ‘might predispose them to acting too soon or doing too much’.

The combination of extreme versions of personality traits and beliefs is a recipe for disaster, or at least fiasco. “Leaders with a markedly high level of self-confidence … are more likely to jump to conclusions and subsequently maintain their course of action even in the light of contradictory new information. If such a highly self- or, rather, over-confident leader’s preferred course of action is to pursue goals through conflictual strategies based on a pessimistic, conflict-prone view … the odds are that policy changes will not be forthcoming even though …  the situation on the ground would suggest otherwise.”

In other words, failed PMs also have themselves to blame.

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* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13501763.2015.1127277

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.   From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information please contact:
Mel Phillips, Marketing Executive
Taylor & Francis Journals
Email: melissa.phillips@tandf.co.uk

, Oxford.

Questioning attitudes to dating across the colour line

A new study examines for the first time how both biracial and monoracial daters really feel about dating someone with a different background to theirs. The research, published in Ethnic and Racial Studies, suggests that, in the US at least, a person’s race still plays a big role in who might ask them out for dinner.

Allison R. McGrath of Vanderbilt University, and her colleagues, studied the profiles and racial preferences of 1,200 men and women on the US version of the dating site Match.com. The rationale for their study is that “although the increasing numbers of biracial people seemingly suggest that the United States is becoming a more racially and ethnically diverse nation, by investigating the dating preferences of biracial individuals, we are able to assess whether racial/ethnic boundaries are truly blurring”.

The authors found that roughly 87% of all monoracial daters would date someone outside their own race/ethnicity. An overwhelming majority of these monoracial daters stated a preference for dating whites (91%), followed by Hispanics (81%), ‘other’ (71%), Asians (67%) and blacks (62%).

The figures were similar for biracial daters, with over 87% indicating that they were willing to date someone outside their own racial/ethnic group. Again the overwhelming majority indicated that they were seeking partners who were white (92%), followed closely by respondents who reported they were willing to date Hispanics (81%) and ‘others’ (71%).

However, when broken down, the results revealed that certain racial/ethnic combinations were less inclined than others to date someone who was partly outside of their own race and ethnicity. White biracial individuals (Asian-white, Hispanic-white, and other-white, for example), were less likely to indicate a preference to date outside of their racial/ethnic category compared to the biracial daters as a whole.

To explain this, the authors suggest that “although our findings indicate that biracial individuals are more likely to seek potential partners outside of their same racial/ethnic identity, their dating preferences also reflect a distinct racial hierarchy that may account for why some racial/ethnic categories are more desirable than others”.

As McGrath and her colleagues explain: “Daters essentially ‘trade’ in personal, social, and cultural capital to find a romantic partner with characteristics that they believe will fulfil their own needs and desires. In the case of race, individuals who possess the highest level of perceived status may choose to date across colour lines if they also perceive some form of surplus (e.g. money or education) that would make the ‘romantic exchange’ equitable”.

NOTE TO JOURNALISTS
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* Read the full article online:http://tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/01419870.2015.1131313

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information, please contact:
Imogen Catling
Marketing Executive, Taylor & Francis Sociology & Law Journals 
Email: imogen.catling@tandf.co.uk

, Philadelphia.

Theory Into Practice has published a new special issue on “Psychological Science at Work in Schools and Education”

When the public thinks about psychology, it likely connects the term with therapy or mental health (Mills, 2009). Although that association is indeed correct, it reflects an overly restrictive view. Psychology began as a science of learning, mental processes, and behavior. Many APA presidents in the early years, including John Dewey, Carl Seashore, and E.L. Thorndike, studied these topics. In fact, the American Psychological Association's (APA's) first president, G. Stanley Hall, was renowned for his work on childhood development and inheritance of behavior.

The aim of this special issue, and the additional section describing other CPSE education related projects and resources, is to help PreK-12 education practitioners in the critically important work they undertake each day to help students learn and develop. We look forward to hearing from readers about these projects and resources and any suggestions they may have for future education-related endeavors that might be undertaken by the psychology and education community.

To view the complete special issue and access free content, visit www.tandfonline.com/HTIP

Theory Into Practice is the peer reviewed, scholarly journal owned by The Ohio State University's College of Education and Human Ecology, and published by Taylor & Francis.

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* Read the full article online:www.tandfonline.com/HTIP

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information, please contact:

Emily Matthias - Senior Marketing Associate, Taylor & Francis Group.
Email: emily.matthias@taylorandfrancis.com
Tel: (215) 606-4238

, Philadelphia.

Am I Drinking Enough? Yes, No, and Maybe. Measuring Adequate Fluid Intake

A study from the Journal of the American College of Nutrition discusses fluid intake adequacy in detail and a simple tool is reviewed that may help healthy, active, low-risk populations answer the question, “Am I drinking enough?”.

Adequacy of fluid intake for replacing meaningful water losses (dehydration) can be assessed simply, inexpensively, and with reasonable fidelity among healthy, active, low-risk individuals. A wide range of fluid intakes are compatible with euhydration (drinking enough), whereby total body water varies narrowly from day to day by 600 to 900 mL (<1% body mass). One measure of fluid intake adequacy involves enough fluid to prevent meaningful body water deficits outside this euhydration range (i.e., dehydration). A second measure of fluid intake adequacy involves enough fluid to balance the renal solute load, which can vary widely inside the euhydration range. The subtle but important distinction between the two types of adequacy may explain some of the ambiguity surrounding the efficacy of hydration status markers.

The results show that adequate fluid intake can be dually defined as a volume of fluid (from water, beverages, and food) sufficient to replace water losses and provide for solute excretion.  Fluid needs can differ greatly among individuals due to variation in the factors that influence both water loss and solute balance; thus, adequacy is consistent with a wide range of fluid intakes and is better gauged using hydration assessment methods.  Therefore adequacy of fluid intake for replacing meaningful water losses (dehydration) can be assessed simply among low-risk individuals. Adequacy of fluid intake for solute excretion per se can also be assessed among individuals but is more difficult to define and less practical to measure.

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About Journal of the American College of Nutrition
Frequency increase in 2016 – now published eight times per year, the Journal of the American College of Nutrition continues to provide original and innovative research in nutrition with useful application for researchers, physicians, and other health care professionals. Journal Citation Reports® ranks Journal of the American College of Nutrition in the category of Nutrition & Dietetics (Science) with an Impact Factor of 1.453 and a 2.867 5-Year Impact Factor (© 2015 Thomson Reuters, 2014 Journal Citation Reports®).

About the American College of Nutrition®
The American College of Nutrition® has been dedicated since 1959 to enhancing clinical nutrition. The College strives to stimulate nutrition research and publication, elevate nutrition knowledge among researchers and clinicians, and provide practical guidance on clinical nutrition.

Follow the American College of Nutrition on Twitter @AmColNutrition.

Society Contact
Michael Stroka, JD, MBA, MS, CNS, Executive Director, American College of Nutrition
Tel: 727-446-6086
Email: mstroka@americancollegeofnutrition.org

NOTE TO JOURNALISTS
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* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/07315724.2015.1067872#.VxpKLXZwaUk

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life. As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information please contact:
Caitlin Sheeder-Borrelli, Journals Marketing Assistant, Taylor & Francis
Email: caitlin.sheeder-borrelli@taylorandfrancis.com

, Philadelphia.

A 7-Year Longitudinal Trial of the Safety and Efficacy of a Calcium Supplement Used to Enhance Bone Mineral Density

A recent study from the Journal of the American College of Nutrition (JACN) examines the safety and efficacy of a vitamin/mineral enhanced plant-sourced calcium supplement [AlgaeCal  (AC)] in female consumers who had taken the supplement from 1 to 7 years.

Consumers who had completed at least one dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) bone mineral density (BMD) scan (N = 172) and/or blood chemistry test (N = 30) and purchased AlgaeCal (AC) from 1 to 7 years were contacted and offered complimentary repeat tests. Safety and efficacy were examined by annualized changes in a 45-measurement blood chemistry panel and changes in BMD.

No adverse effects or safety concerns were found in any of the annualized within-group annualized changes in the 45 blood chemistries or in between-group changes in a similar control group (n = 5070) who completed the same measurements. With regard to BMD, consistent and statistically significant within-group increases were found for the 7-year study period and when compared to expected BMD changes in 3 large databases or the combination (N = 25,885) of the 3 databases. Data from this study suggest that AlgaeCal (AC) supplement was associated with a significant annualized and linear increase in BMD of 1.04% per year, 7.3% over the 7-year study period. These results stand in marked contrast to normative or expected changes of −0.4%/y from 3 different databases or in a combination of all 3 databases (N = 16,289).

The results showed that no evidence was found in cardiovascular risk as measured by adverse changes in blood lipids, nor was any evidence found of a diminished efficacy over the 7-year study period because gains in BMD were consistent and linear over the 7-year study period, averaging 1.04% per year over the 7-year study.

The results are also consistent with earlier short-term studies suggesting that the AlgaeCal (AC) supplement can facilitate significant increases in total body BMD in contrast to studies suggesting that calcium supplements can only slow down age-related declines in BMD.

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About Journal of the American College of Nutrition
Frequency Increase in 2016 – Now published eight times per year, the Journal of the American College of Nutrition continues to provide original and innovative research in nutrition with useful application for researchers, physicians, and other health care professionals. Journal Citation Reports® ranks Journal of the American College of Nutrition in the category of Nutrition & Dietetics (Science) with an Impact Factor of 1.453 and a 2.867 5-Year Impact Factor (© 2015 Thomson Reuters, 2014 Journal Citation Reports®). Submit manuscripts at http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/JACN

About the American College of Nutrition
The American College of Nutrition has been dedicated since 1959 to enhancing clinical nutrition. The College strives to stimulate nutrition research and publication, elevate nutrition knowledge among researchers and clinicians, and provide practical guidance on clinical nutrition. Follow the American College of Nutrition on Twitter @AmColNutrition

Society Contact
Michael Stroka, JD, MBA, MS, CNS, Executive Director, American College of Nutrition
Tel: 727-446-6086
Email: mstroka@americancollegeofnutrition.org

NOTE TO JOURNALISTS
When referencing the article: Please include Journal title, author, published by Taylor & Francis and the following statement:

* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/07315724.2015.1090357

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life. As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information please contact:
Caitlin Sheeder-Borrelli, Journals Marketing Assistant, Taylor & Francis
Email: caitlin.sheeder-borrelli@taylorandfrancis.com

, Philadelphia.

Midwest Sociological Society to partner with Routledge from 2017

Routledge, part of the Taylor & Francis Group, and the Midwest Sociological Society are pleased to announce their new partnership from 2017 to publish the Society’s prestigious journal The Sociological Quarterly. Established in 1936, the Society is one of the largest American regional sociological associations with around 1,300 members from the Midwest region and elsewhere. The Sociological Quarterly is a scholarly, ranked journal, recognised as one of the leading generalist journals in sociology, and has been publishing cutting-edge research and theory since 1960.

Routledge have been supporters of the Midwest Sociological Society and its Annual Meeting for many years, and this partnership is a natural development in our history, demonstrating our shared commitment to developing publications which advance the field of sociology. Both Routledge’s sociology team and The Sociological Quarterly’s editorial team are excited to be working together on the ambitious plans they have developed for the journal’s future.

Doug Hartmann, President of the Midwest Sociological Society, comments, “We weren't looking to make a change, but Routledge, a long-time supporter of the Midwest Sociological Society, pursued The Sociological Quarterly passionately, with an ambitious plan for enhancing our journal's ranking in the upper echelon of sociological research and publishing worldwide. We were blown away and couldn't be more excited.”

Kevin Bradley, President of Taylor & Francis US Journals, comments, “Routledge, Taylor & Francis is proud to embark on its publishing partnership with the Midwest Sociological Society. The Sociological Quarterly brings with it an impressive history of high-quality primary research; we are honored to become the purveyors of this fine scholarly publication.”

More information on this transition, including details for subscribers and readers, will be available later this year. In the meantime, Routledge are looking forward to welcoming the Society to the Taylor & Francis Group from 2017.

About the Midwest Sociological Society

The Midwest Sociological Society was founded in 1936 and is a membership organization of academic and applied sociologists as well as students of the discipline. About two thirds of the 1,300 members live in the Midwest, but membership is open to all; and about one third of the members are from other parts of the nation and the world. The Society publishes The Sociological Quarterly¸ holds a four-day annual meeting each spring, and supports a minority fellowship, several grant and award programs, and research by the Society’s members.

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life. As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information please contact:
Caitlin Sheeder-Borrelli, Journals Marketing Assistant, Taylor & Francis
Email: caitlin.sheeder-borrelli@taylorandfrancis.com