Taylor & Francis Newsroom

, Philadelphia.

People using social media while viewing political debates learn less about candidates

A study published in Political Communication has found that knowledge of candidates gained by watching televised debates is compromised by simultaneous use of social media.

The study was based on three waves of a six-wave Annenberg Public Policy Center survey, each including at least 1,216 interviews with U.S. adults. Two waves were based on debates between President Barack Obama and Mitt Romney, and the third took place post-election.

More than one in five people who watched at least some of the 2012 presidential election debates reported simultaneously following reactions on social media. Debate viewing-social media multitaskers actually learned less about the candidates, particularly their preferred candidate. “Overall,” said lead author Jeffrey Gottfried, “debates are still an incredibly powerful forum in which people can learn about the candidates. But social media seem to be distracting viewers from learning.”

Social media’s popularity as a news source is growing exponentially, especially among younger demographics - 44 percent of 18 to 29-year-old respondents used social media while watching the third presidential debate, compared to only ten percent of those ages 50 and up.

The findings suggest that watching a debate with or without simultaneous social media use is more informative than not watching a debate at all, and social media use correlates overall with increased knowledge of campaign issues and facts. Still, the increasing prevalence of social media use over subsequent election cycles carries the potential to diminish positive effects of debate viewing.

“If you want to learn as much as you can about the candidates’ stands,” advised co-author Bruce Hardy, “don’t simultaneously use social media.”

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* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/10584609.2016.1154120

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information please contact:
Michael Hobson, Marketing Assistant, Journals
Email: michael.hobson@taylorandfrancis.com

, Philadelphia.

Winning weather photography announced

Winning weather photography announced

Photos came in from around the country, but in the end, there was only one Grand Prize winner in Weatherwise Magazine’s 2016 Photo Contest: Fred Wasmer of Gainesville, Florida, won for his picture of a jet aircraft flying underneath a bank of mammatus clouds.

According to Margaret Benner Smidt, editor of Weatherwise, “The judges were impressed by this year's particularly robust selection of photos - there were many that could have made the grade as winners.” The panel of judges, which consists of Bob Ryan, former president of the American Meteorological Society; Stanley David Gedzelman, a retired professor of meteorology at the City College of New York; and Doyle Rice, Weather Editor at USA Today, had a tough time selecting the winners. In the end, Benner Smidt says, they chose the fourteen photos that “best exemplify the power, beauty, and excitement of weather. The photos selected balance quality of image with rarity of the phenomenon photographed”.

Some of the best photos this year were of crepuscular and anti-crepuscular rays, auroras, funnel clouds, dust devils, banner clouds, lenticular clouds, arc clouds, mammatus, coronas, and halos.

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* Read the full article online:http://tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00431672.2016.1210946

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.   From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information please contact: 
Jillian O’Hara – Science and Technology Journals Marketing Assistant
e-mail: jillian.ohara@taylorandfrancis.com

Follow us on Twitter @tandfnewsroom

, Singapore.

Stronger turbine blades will reduce carbon dioxide emissions

New research in Science and Technology of Advanced Materials discovers that molybdenum silicides can improve the efficiency of turbine blades and reduce fuel consumption.

Gas turbines are the engines that generate electricity in power plants. The operating temperatures of their combustion systems can exceed 1,600 °C. The nickel-based turbine blades used in these systems melt at temperatures 200 °C lower and thus require air-cooling to function. Turbine blades made out of materials with higher melting temperatures would require less fuel consumption and lead to lower CO2 emissions.

Materials scientists at Japan’s Kyoto University investigated the properties of various compositions of molybdenum silicides, with and without additional ternary elements.

Previous research showed that fabricating molybdenum silicide-based composites by pressing and heating their powders – known as powder metallurgy – improved their resistance to fracturing at ambient temperatures but lowered their high-temperature strength, due to the development of silicon dioxide layers within the material.

The Kyoto University team fabricated their molybdenum silicide-based materials using a method known as “directional solidification,” in which molten metal progressively solidifies in a certain direction.

The team found that a homogeneous material could be formed by controlling the solidification rate of the molybdenum silicide-based composite during fabrication and by adjusting the amount of the ternary element added to the composite.

The resulting material starts deforming plastically under uniaxial compression  above 1,000 °C. Also, the material’s high-temperature strength increases through microstructure refinement. Adding tantalum to the composite is more effective than adding vanadium, niobium or tungsten for improving the strength of the material at temperatures around 1,400 °C. The alloys fabricated by the Kyoto University team are much stronger at high temperatures than modern nickel-based superalloys as well as recently developed ultrahigh-temperature structural materials, the researchers report.

 

Figure: Electron micrographs of directionally solidified (DS) ingots of binary composites. (right): Temperature dependence of yield stress of DS MoSi2/Mo5Si3 eutectic composites and some high-temperature materials.
©2016 Hirotaka Matsunoshita, Yuta Sasai, Kosuke Fujiwara, Kyosuke Kishida and Haruyuki Inui.

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* Read the full article online:http://tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/14686996.2016.1218248

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.   From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

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Aletheia Heah, Taylor & Francis Group
Marketing Executive
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National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS)

NIMS

National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS) is an institution specializing in research in organic and inorganic materials.

Visit the NIMS homepage: http://www.nims.go.jp

 

For further information please contact:
Mikiko Tanifuji
Publishing Director
Science and Technology of Advanced Materials
National Institute for Materials Science
Email: TANIFUJI.Mikiko@nims.go.jp

, Oxford.

#allmalepanels – how to break the cycle of discrimination

It might seem that equal rights have come a long way, but how far are we from true diversity and equality? New research by Cardiff University's Marysia Zalewski in the International Feminist Journal of Politics broaches the issue of endemic discrimination by looking at the all too common phenomena of ‘all male panels’.

Zalewski describes how superficial solutions to this ‘all male’ event, such as the last minute addition of a ‘minority’ popped into your panel, creates an illusion of diversity. She recalls Miss Triggs - a caricature board member whose valuable input is ignored unless repeated by her male colleagues. This epitomizes the problem of old-fashioned - but very much alive - discriminatory practises. As Zalewski notes, simply ‘adding’ a woman to make up the numbers is not enough to cast gender inequality into history. So how do we break the cycle of discrimination? 

Zalewski proposes a radical shake up of the gender order underpinning our supposedly equality driven liberal institutional practices. She notes there are many measures in place, such as pay audits and obligatory equality/diversity policies. These institutionalised equality practices tend to obscure the depth, and even shore up the problem as apparently there is nothing left to complain about.

Zalewski concludes: “The intention of feminism is hard to maintain especially in the corporate world in which, as academics, we are all embroiled….how prepared are we to know how to say why and to act? Perhaps it is time to become more critically radical (again), and to be more explicit.”

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About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.   From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information please contact:
Mel Phillips, Marketing Executive
Taylor & Francis Journals
Email: melissa.phillips@tandf.co.uk

About Cardiff University

Cardiff University

Cardiff University is recognised in independent government assessments as one of Britain’s leading teaching and research universities and is a member of the Russell Group of the UK’s most research intensive universities. The 2014 Research Excellence Framework ranked the University 5th in the UK for research excellence. Among its academic staff are two Nobel Laureates, including the winner of the 2007 Nobel Prize for Medicine, University Chancellor Professor Sir Martin Evans.  Founded by Royal Charter in 1883, today the University combines impressive modern facilities and a dynamic approach to teaching and research. The University’s breadth of expertise encompasses: the College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences; the College of Biomedical and Life Sciences; and the College of Physical Sciences and Engineering, along with a longstanding commitment to lifelong learning. Cardiff’s flagship Research Institutes are offering radical new approaches to pressing global problems. www.cardiff.ac.uk

For more information please contact:
Victoria Dando, Senior Communications Officer
Email: DandoV2@cardiff.ac.uk

, Oxford.

Routledge Historical Resources: History of Feminism features primary sources digitised for the first time

Routledge Historical Resources: History of Feminism features primary sources digitised for the first time

The first digital resource to launch as part of Routledge Historical Resources, History of Feminism is a curated collection of primary and secondary resources from the Taylor and Francis collection relating to the long Nineteenth Century of feminism (1776-1928).

Created with the help of academic editor Professor Ann Heilmann, History of Feminism provides the ideal starting point for students and researchers who are studying this period of history as well as providing key pieces of primary content to aid research.

This resource features thousands of chapters of primary source materials digitised for the first time alongside 1,000 chapters of secondary book content, one hundred journal articles from a range of Taylor and Francis journals and sixteen newly commissioned thematic essays by experts in the field.

Images from LSE Women’s Library help to bring the resource to life as well as creating a fully comprehensive resource of this much studied era of gender history.

Examples of articles from History of Feminism:

The Campaign for Women’s Suffrage in Britain
Feminism and Literature in the Long Nineteenth Century
Sexuality (1880–1928)
A Woman's Work is Never Done? Women and Leisure in the Nineteenth Century and Beyond

NOTES FOR EDITORS
For more information, or to request a free trial, please contact Emma Hinde (details below).
When referencing the product, please include: Routledge Historical Resources: History of Feminism, published by Routledge (Taylor & Francis Group).

*Learn more about Routledge Historical Resources: History of Feminism at: www.routledgehistoricalresources.com/feminism

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.  From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

Emma Hinde – Associate Marketing Manager, Routledge.
Email: Emma.Hinde@tandf.co.uk
Tel: +44 (0) 207 017 3778

Follow us on Twitter @tandfnewsroom and @routledgehist

, Philadelphia.

Sweet news: Review of literature indicates sucralose is not linked to cancer

In a society where obesity is increasingly recognized as a risk factor for disease, low- and no-calorie ingredients are logical choices for those wishing to manage their weight.  However, some people have concerns that sucralose, a no-calorie sweetener, may be linked to cancer.  A new article published in Nutrition and Cancer: An International Journal may finally put those fears to rest; a comprehensive review of studies testing the safety and carcinogenicity of sucralose has confirmed that the artificial sweetener does not cause cancer, and is safe to ingest.

“This latest review of sucralose studies should reassure those who choose sucralose, and can be particularly useful to scientists and healthcare professionals, who may be asked for information on low calorie sweetener safety,” says lead author of the study, Professor Dr. Sir Colin Berry, Emeritus Professor of Pathology at the University of London.

Sir Berry and his fellow researchers conducted a review of studies assessing sucralose carcinogenicity potential, and placed them in the context of the types of studies relied upon by national and international regulatory agencies to make recommendations on the safety of new food ingredients.  These studies are designed to maximize the possibility of detecting potentially adverse effects, and as such, adverse outcomes are expected to occur at some point.

To that end, many of the studies observe the results of dosages hundreds to thousands of times greater than any reasonable level of consumption.  For example, the studies reviewed include observations on consumption of sucralose in quantities equivalent in sweetness to 74 to 495 pounds of sugar per day for an average weight (e.g., 75 kg) adult.

The Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI) for sucralose, established by the Joint Food and Agricultural Organization/World Health Organization Expert Committee on Food Additives, is 0 to 15 mg/kg body weight/day.  In the studies reviewed, even when exposure levels were several orders of magnitude greater than the recommended ADI, sucralose did not demonstrate carcinogenic activity.

“Concerns are raised from time to time on what components of our lifestyle affect the rates of cancer,” continues Sir Berry.  “Smoking and sunlight are on all our lists and obesity is beginning to be recognised as a major factor. So low calorie sweeteners, which are important to many in managing their weight, need to be examined carefully in terms of lifetime use.”

Disclaimer:  Funding for both the independent literature review, which formed the basis for the current paper, and the preparation of the manuscript, was provided by McNeil Nutritionals (creator of Splenda, since sold to Heartland Food Products).  All study authors were employees of, or consultants to, McNeil Nutritionals at the time the manuscript was prepared.  Some of the studies on sucralose’s safety reviewed in this study were also funded by the artificial sweetener industry.

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* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/01635581.2016.1224366

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science and Technology, and Medicine.  From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

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Claire McKenzie
Senior Marketing Associate
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, Oxford.

“See it before it’s gone”: the paradox of ‘last chance tourism’ on the Great Barrier Reef

Many of the tourists now flocking to see Australia’s Great Barrier Reef (GBR) are hoping to ‘see it before it’s gone’ – in the latest example of what’s come to be known as ‘Last Chance Tourism (LCT)’.

Annah Piggott-McKellar and Karen McNamara from the University of Queensland (Australia) explain the concept of ‘LCT’ in the current issue of the Journal of Sustainable Tourism.

They write: “LCT is a niche tourism market focused on witnessing and experiencing a place before it disappears. This tourism market can also be referred to as climate change, disappearing or vanishing, doom, dying, endangered or ‘see it before it’s gone’ tourism.”

As Piggott-McKellar and McNamara note, at the heart of LCT is a paradox: the tourists scrambling to visit a particular site ‘before it’s gone’ are themselves contributing to its destruction. Population pressure, on-site activities associated with access and carbon emission related to travel can cause a site to deteriorate further, thus raising its ‘destination status’ by being in greater danger and creating more demand for visits.

To investigate this paradox, and learn more about what motivates tourists to travel to the GBR, the pair questioned over 230 visitors to the site last year.

Overall, the data suggested that just under 70% of respondents were ‘strongly motivated’ to see the Reef ‘before it’s gone’ – the first concrete evidence of the GBR having become an LCT destination.

‘Last chance tourists’ were found to be predominantly ‘older, more environmentally conscious females who are visiting the region for the first time and who have travelled greater distances, both
on a domestic and international scale.’

Those seeking a ‘last chance experience’ were also more likely to be concerned about the health of the reef – in particular coral bleaching and climate change, both of which, incidentally, would have an effect on a tourist’s experience of the site.

“This finding was of interest,” they write, “as it emphasizes the paradox involved in LCT, in that tourists are travelling greater distances to view the destination that is in danger, contributing higher levels of emissions and thus exacerbating the impacts of climate change.”

In contrast, the tourists surveyed only had moderate to low concern about the impact of the tourist industry or other destructive factors on the reef itself. That tourists do not associate their own travel to the reef with damage is part of the paradox of LCT. 

This study provides an important baseline for further research into travel to the GBR. It also provides insight into the need to improve tourists’ awareness of real threats to the reef, which includes the tourists themselves, among a host of other threats.

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* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09669582.2016.1213849

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information please contact:
Lannette Heast, Marketing Manager
email: Lannette.Clifford@tandf.co.uk

Follow us at @RoutledgeTravel

About the University of Queensland

University of Queensland

For more than a century, The University of Queensland has educated and partnered with outstanding people to create change through delivering knowledge leadership for a better world.

UQ is one of Australia¹s Group of Eight, a charter member of edX and a founding member of Universitas 21.
The University of Queensland ranks in the world¹s top universities, as measured by several key independent rankings, including the Performance Ranking of Scientific Papers for World Universities (45), the US News Best Global Universities Rankings (52), QS World University Rankings (51), Academic Ranking of World Universities (55), and the Times Higher Education World University Rankings (60).

, Oxford.

Feeding a Mars mission: the challenges of growing plants in space

Feeding a Mars mission: the challenges of growing plants in space

Plants will play a critical role in the survival of human beings on long-duration space missions, such as a mission to Mars. However, as a paper published in Botany Letters shows, many challenges need to be addressed if astronauts are to successfully grow enough food on board spacecraft and on other planets.

Lucie Poulet and colleagues from the University of Clermont-Ferrand, Auvergne outline in their review that while healthy plants can be grown in space, the long-term effects of the space environment on plant growth and reproduction are not yet well known.

Since the 1960s, experiments conducted in space stations and research rockets have shown that plants can grow normally in microgravity provided factors such as confinement, lack of ventilation and elevated radiation levels are taken into account. 

However, microgravity can reduce cell growth, alter gene expression and change the pattern of root growth – all aspects which critically affect plant cultivation in space.

Seeds produced in orbit also seem to have different composition and developmental stages from seeds grown on Earth. As well as affecting the performance and nutritional content of space seeds, this could damage the flavour of plants produced in space, which might become a problem for crews reliant on plant-based diets during long space missions.

While there appears to be no major obstacle to plant growth in space, large-scale tests for food production in reduced gravity are still lacking, and a number of viable technologies for space agriculture need to be developed.

These include efficient watering and nutrient-delivery systems, precise atmospheric controls for temperature, humidity and air composition, and low-energy lighting which could include sun collection systems that take advantage of sunlight on the surface of planets and moons.

Selecting the right crops to grow in space is also essential. Given the limited amount of room available on board a spacecraft, plants with reduced size but high yields need to be developed: for example, dwarf varieties of wheat, cherry tomato, rice, pepper, soybean and pea have been successfully grown in orbit and in simulated planetary habitats.

Lucie Poulet said: “Challenges remain in terms of nutrient delivery, lighting and ventilation, but also in the choice of plant species and traits to favour. Additionally, significant effort must be made on mechanistic modelling of plant growth to reach a more thorough understanding of the intricate physical, biochemical and morphological phenomena involved if we are to accurately control and predict plant growth and development in a space environment.”

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* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/23818107.2016.1194228

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life. As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information please contact:

Deirdre Kilbride
Marketing Executive, Taylor and Francis Journals
Email: Deirdre.Kilbride@tandf.co.uk
Visit our newsroom at: http://newsroom.taylorandfrancisgroup.com/
Follow us on Twitter @tandfnewsroom

, Oxford.

Do the writing styles of Hillary’s memoirs mirror her greatest political struggle?

Do the writing styles of Hillary’s memoirs mirror her greatest political struggle?

The memoir has long formed an important part of politicians’ careers, no more so when they are positioning themselves for a run to the highest level of office. Carnegie Mellon University’s David S. Kaufer and the University of Maryland’s Shawn J. Parry-Giles have reviewed Hillary Clinton’s two political memoirs:  Living History (2003), spanning Clinton’s childhood through her years as First Lady, and Hard Choices (2014), recounting her tenure as Secretary of State. They reveal that while there are contrasts in narrative style between the two memoirs, a common theme is Clinton’s guardedness – which may mirror how she is perceived more generally as a politician in the forthcoming U.S. presidential election. The authors discuss their findings in a new study published in the Quarterly Journal of Speech, a National Communication Association journal.

Traditionally, the two approaches to life writing are seen as the Plutarchian (Plutarch argued that memoirs should be confined to the leader’s performance in the public domain) and the Boswellian (James Boswell championed burrowing below the public domain and into the leader’s intimate thoughts). The authors discuss how Clinton changes from the Boswellian style in Living History, to the Plutarchian record of her term in office in Hard Choices, and how both memoirs feature additional Clinton identities that shed light on her strategies for a future presidential run and reveal the identity problems she has faced as a woman vying for the presidency.

The differences between the approaches are more than ideological – they require radically different styles of writing, and the researchers believe they are fraught with additional challenges for female politicians. Clinton has been attacked for being too much of a “policy wonk” and not revealing enough about her personal life in her memoirs, but Kaufer and Parry-Giles argue that this is a by-product of the “double bind” women face in politics. The potential backlash means women in politics often find they can’t be too intellectual or too emotional; nor can they be too serious or too jovial.

As the authors state:

“Because of the constraints they live under, female candidates can find it difficult to inspirit the same level of passion in voters as their male counterparts. They must closely monitor their vocal qualities, their facial expressions, their intellectual displays, their clothing choices, their hair styles, and their emotional expressions. A woman candidate’s constant need to stay ‘correct’ places serious constraints on her ability to inspire. Because of the binds they face, it is easy for women candidates to be pushed back into pragmatism to remain ‘appropriate.’”

The authors conclude that given this backdrop, it is unsurprising that Clinton seems personally guarded in her memoirs, and that she has struggled to write personally in the true Boswellian style, while also keeping her privacy under wraps. This perhaps explains her steepest political challenge – creating an identity that is authentic and trustworthy.

About the authors:
David S. Kaufer is a professor in the Department of English at Carnegie Mellon University. Shawn J. Parry-Giles is a professor in the Department of Communication at the University of Maryland.

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* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00335630.2016.1221529

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life. As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information please contact:

Marita Eleftheriadou, Senior Marketing Executive, Journals
Email: Marita.Eleftheriadou@tandf.co.uk

About the National Communication Association

NCA - National Communication Association

The National Communication Association (NCA) advances Communication as the discipline that studies all forms, modes, media, and consequences of communication through humanistic, social scientific, and aesthetic inquiry. NCA serves the scholars, teachers, and practitioners who are its members by enabling and supporting their professional interests in research and teaching. Dedicated to fostering and promoting free and ethical communication, NCA promotes the widespread appreciation of the importance of communication in public and private life, the application of competent communication to improve the quality of human life and relationships, and the use of knowledge about communication to solve human problems.

For more information, visit natcom.org, follow us on Twitter at @natcomm, and find us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/NationalCommunicationAssociation.

, Oxford.

‘Brexit’ appealed more to the ‘losers’ of globalization than its ‘winners’

‘Brexit’ appealed more to the ‘losers’ of globalization than its ‘winners’

Voters’ hopes and fears about globalization were a key factor in June’s vote for ‘Brexit’ – and will continue to challenge the political establishment for years to come, according to a new study.

Writing in the Journal of European Public Policy, Sara B. Hobolt of the London School of Economics and Political Science analyses campaign and survey data to understand the shock result – and what it might mean for the future of Europe.

Although the choice was a simple one – between ‘in’ or ‘out’ – the British public was divided about what the main referendum issue was. Concern about the loss of economic stability and the economic benefits of EU membership resonated with Remain voters, while Leave voters highlighted issues relating to immigration and national identity.

Looking at the data, Hobolt writes: “Fears of immigration and multiculturalism are more pronounced among voters with lower levels of education and in a more vulnerable position in the labour market. Such voters also voted most decisively for Leave, whereas the ‘winners’ of globalization – the younger and highly educated professionals – were overwhelmingly in favour of Remain.”

In Hobolt’s view, there is no immediate danger of ‘contagion’ from the Brexit vote spurring on membership referenda in other European countries – in fact, it’s probably made them less likely – but the outlook isn’t entirely rosy.

She observes: “Across Europe we find similar divisions between the so-called winners of globalization and those who feel left behind. While the former tend to embrace European integration and multiculturalism, the latter feel threatened by the changes that globalization and European integration have brought about.”

It’s clear that the challenges the EU now faces go beyond any economic and political fallout from Brexit: many voters now see the EU as part of the problem, rather than the solution, when it comes to protecting them from the consequences of globalization. 

Commenting on her study earlier this month, Hobolt said: “The outcome of the Brexit vote came as a shock to the political establishment in Britain and across Europe. Yet, the electoral success of anti-establishment and anti-immigration messages is not unique to this referendum, but fuel the support for populist parties in the continent as well. The growing divide between winners and losers of globalization explains much of this appeal.”

Her study concludes: “The challenge for European leaders, both domestically and at the European level, is to find a way of addressing the concerns of the many citizens who have not felt the economic benefits of free trade and globalization, and who feel that their distinct national identity and culture is under threat from immigration and European integration.” 

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* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13501763.2016.1225785

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