Taylor & Francis Newsroom

, Oxford.

Because it’s not worth it: deceptive claims in cosmetics advertising

If you’re sceptical about the claims made by cosmetics firms about the attributes of their lotions and potions, you’re not alone. A study by US academics just published in the Journal of Global Fashion Marketing shows how little truth there seems to be in those glossy magazine ads – as well as how unlikely we are to believe them anyway.

Jie G. Fowler, Timothy Reisenwitz and Les Carson examined 289 full-page cosmetics ads from the April 2013 issues of seven fashion titles such as Vogue, Glamour and Marie Claire. The ads studied covered a wide range of product categories, such as make-up, facial skincare, body products, fragrance, hair and nail products.

The researchers first divided the claims made in the glossy ads into categories, including ‘environmental claims’ (‘no testing on animals’), endorsement claims (‘recommended by dermatologists’) and ‘scientific claims’ (‘clinically proven’). A panel of three judges then classified the claims made into one of four categories of truthfulness: ‘outright lie’, ‘omission’, ‘vague’ and ‘acceptable’.

In the end, only 18% of all claims made by the cosmetics companies were deemed ‘acceptable’ by the panel. Just 14% of ‘scientific’ claims were deemed acceptable, as opposed to 50% of those made about a product’s environmental attributes. Even more troubling for women worried about their wrinkles, the panel judged only 25.1% of performance claims to be acceptable, with 23% deemed to be an ‘outright lie’.

In addition to how unlikely consumers seem to be persuaded by the claims made in glossy magazines, the research also draws attention to the quirks of the regulatory processes by which ‘grey-area’ products like cosmeceuticals are considered to be a drug or a cosmetic – which in turn influence how a product can be marketed. “Categorization as a drug subjects the product to extensive regulatory requirements for new drugs,” the authors write, “so, ironically, cosmeceutical marketers do not want to prove the efficacy of their product, since drug regulation would then apply. Consequently, cosmeceutical advertising needs to attract consumers, but not regulators.”

The authors also note that given their results and the clear disbelief expressed by the judges regarding the cosmetic claims put before them, consumers (at least as represented by the judges) are already sceptical of product claims and are likely to consider them lies, omitting important information, or too vague to be of use.  Their observations thus have implications for advertisers, who, it seems, need to promote their products to customers increasingly distrustful that miracles can really be found in a jar.

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* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/20932685.2015.1032319

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

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Louise Phillips, Marketing Executive, Taylor & Francis Journals

email: louise.phillips@tandf.co.uk

, Oxford.

When plane spotting is more than just a hobby - CIA detention and torture in Europe and the tracking of rendition aircrafts

International human rights law is one of the greatest achievements of the human race. Yes, it is often infringed. But while we expect autocratic regimes to violate civil liberties, what if democracies were breaching them too? A new study from Taylor & Francis examines the tracking of the CIA’s rendition aircrafts and claims human rights have been violated in the very heart of Europe by a number of countries in connivance with the US secret services.

Published in The International Journal of Human Rights, the research reveals the tracking of rendition aircrafts carrying suspect terrorists has been integral to shed new light on to the CIA’s retention, detention and interrogation (RDI) programme. Examining findings from The Rendition Project, a collaboration between academics at Kent and Kingston universities and the NGO Reprieve, the study uncovers the involvement of a number of European states in providing vital logistical support to the US secret services, demonstrating the analysis of covert operations can further human rights research.

On July 2014, the European Convention of Human Rights (ECtHR) found Poland guilty of contravening international human rights by allowing the US secret services to hold and torture suspect terrorists on its soil. For the first time ‘a court had established … that European territory had been used in the War on Terror to house so-called “black sites”’, a network of secret prisons run by the CIA with support from local governments, explain the academics leading the study. These black sites were part of a wide system of detention facilities connected by hundreds of rendition flights used to transfer prisoners through sites, and either operated by commercial companies, or the CIA itself, in the early 2000s. Identifying these aircrafts was crucial to map the evolution of the RDI programme over the years and held perpetrators to account.

Thanks to a group of human rights investigators and journalists who started to record the movements of suspicious aircrafts using flight data, a first picture of the CIA’s secret detention programme in Europe started to emerge; this led to the identification of Romania and Lithuania, in addition to Poland, as crucial European nodes for the operation. But it was only after 2010, following the collaboration between The Rendition Project and the NGO Reprieve, that the inquiry really gained momentum and culminated with the publication of The Rendition Flight Database in 2013: the most comprehensive public account of the CIA’s covert activities, including over 60 identified rendition operations and over 11,000 flights by over 200 aircrafts. This data, triangulated with first-hand accounts, memoranda and declassified government documents, brought to the reconstruction of meaningful flight circuits, as well as to the identification of the pattern and practice of rendition flights in the War on Terror.

Whereas further research into this matter is still needed, this study is key in showing that tracking rendition aircrafts can truly help to identify human rights violations and secure legal remedy. Moreover, in underlining the value of collaborations between scholars and human rights investigators in uncovering abuse, it puts them at the very heart of the fight to protect worldwide democracy and freedom.

Tracking rendition aircraft as a way to understand CIA secret detention and torture in Europe
Sam Raphael, Crofton Black, Ruth Blakeley & Steve Kostas
The International Journal of Human Rights

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Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life. As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, e-books and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.  From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

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Joseph Couchman, Marketing Executive
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email: joseph.couchman@tandf.co.uk

, Oxford.

What are the causes and effects of increased gaming in adolescent girls and boys?

Technological innovations, multiple genres, online gaming and mobile apps have led gaming to become big business.  Call of Duty Black Ops sold 1.4 million copies and registered 2.6 million Xbox Live players on launch day.  Adolescents increasingly use gaming for a significant part of their leisure time.  New research in the Journal of Youth Studies examines World Health Organisation data on adolescent well-being collected from over 4,000 children aged 11-15 to determine why some adolescents gaming habits are escalating.  The author reflects on gender, age, policy, parental influences and outcomes for adolescents.

About half of all adolescents are gaming for two or more hours per day, spending more time at home and less time out socialising. There are well-documented risks to social development, physiology, sleep, mental health and school performance.  Further hypotheses of reduced empathy and propensity for aggression remain unproven.  On the plus side gaming is shown to benefit motivational skills, tenacity, problem solving and strategic thinking.  So how much is too much? Why are some adolescents exceeding healthy levels of gaming? 

Policy recommendations for use of electronic media are two hours per day in the US, UK and Australia.  Parental monitoring methods are increasingly recognised as a significant factor. Many parents monitor ‘co-play’, partly to scrutinise content the child is exposed to.  Children whose parents regularly monitor usage were less likely to go above two hours.  Those whose parents were very controlling became defiant, pushing up usage, but many reported no parental input at all. 

Children with mixed gender friend groups game for longer, an indicator of the increase in sociable group gaming.  Early adolescents game longer than 15 year olds, a likely pointer to educational stage and development.  Gender affects time spent gaming; boys are three times more likely than girls to spend over six hours gaming per week.   Across both genders gaming provides an escape from stress; in boys from bullying and girls from discontentment.  Boys with higher levels reported frequent hunger at bedtime, which may be evidence of gaming interfering with meal times.  The author concludes “gendered interventions may be necessary to address successfully those who are engaging in very high levels of gaming with the associated negative consequences to their overall well-being”.

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* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13676261.2015.1048200

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.   From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information please contact:
Rebecca Bray
Taylor & Francis Journals
Email: rebecca.bray@tandf.co.uk

, Oxford.

Could camouflage be the secret to success in football?

Researchers conclude that while use of camouflage and intelligent colour have proven to be vital in the army for more than a century, football kit colours are still not acknowledged as a possible success factor.

Two separate studies concerning the relationship between the colour of a team’s shirt and visibility were recently conducted, leading to striking conclusions that were published in 'Science and Medicine in Football', the regular supplement of Journal of Sports Sciences.

In the first experiment, students were asked to try and make a correct assessment of the positions of computer-animated football players who were dressed in different colours.  It was shown that a white uniform resulted in the best location assessment. As white outfits were significantly better assessed than green outfitted players’ in a virtual football environment in 5.2% of the trials, it may follow that the ability to successfully pass a ball to a teammate relies directly to the colour of the jerseys of the team. Therefore, it seems a possibility that a team completes more successful passes when wearing high-visible kits.

In the second study, derived from an analysis of the relationship between seasonal results and away outfit’ colours of nine Premier League teams over 17 years, the researchers found that two Premier League clubs’ results: Manchester City and Newcastle United, correlated with a certain degree of visibility of shirts. The researchers argue that the found correlations are ‘preliminary’ outcomes, the results support that the application of smart use of colour may support a team’s style of play.

“…wearing low contrast, camouflaging uniforms may lead to an increase in defensive abilities of teams with a predominant defensive strategy”

Based on their findings, the researchers hypothesize that teams with an attacking style of play such as the former Champions League winner Real Madrid and World Cup champions Germany may have benefitted from the increased visibility of teammates through wearing highly visible (white) kits.

On the contrary, wearing low contrast, camouflaging uniforms may lead to an increase in defensive abilities of teams with a predominant defensive strategy. This hypothesis lead to the striking conclusion that, for attacking-style teams unable to reign on the pitch (such as the England national football team last year), wearing white uniforms may have be a distinct disadvantage.

The authors reason that one can acquire important clues for the application of intelligent colour use in football from the majestic evolutions in the animal kingdom: “Take for example the biological ingenuity seen in stick-insects; as they lack large claws and teeth or venom, they make sure that they blend in perfectly with the environment, so that they can thrive when overlooked by the larger predators.”

While further research is needed to elaborate on the new perspectives, managers seeking opportunities to improve their teams by that crucial few percent may wish to explore the possibilities of applying the gained insights into their new 15-16’s season colours.

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* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/02640414.2015.1064156

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Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

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James Collyer, Marketing Executive, Taylor & Francis Group.
Email: James.Collyer@tandf.co.uk

, Oxford.

Statistics crown Colin Montgomerie as Ryder Cup king

The Ryder Cup has been the Holy Grail for elite golfers since 1927, originally held biennially between the United States, and first Great Britain, now Europe, it inspires patriotism and sporting excellence in equal measure.  In this study published in Journal of Applied Statistics, Baker & McHale implement a model to assess strengths and rankings of Ryder Cup competitors over recent years to answer the vital question – who is the best Ryder Cup golfer?

Such a ranking exercise is difficult. There are many models available but a ‘one size fits all’ approach is not sufficient here due to asymmetrical data and complexities such as estimated strengths, different numbers of appearances, and different levels of volatility in results.  The Ryder Cup comprises singles match play, four balls and foursomes.  To allow for these characteristics, the authors use a modified version of the Bradley-Terry model, allotting strength parameters to each player’s probability of winning a hole.  Adjustments were made in the rankings to counteract the inflation of players who win by large margins.  Data was collected for all matches, results and players over the last 40 years, comprising 924 matches and 327 players.  Interestingly there is little cross-over between top Ryder Cup players (based on points) and top players on point-win percentage (in at least 10 matches).  The Bradley-Terry model is a key benefit here as opponent strength is considered in addition to statistics.

Overall results indicate Colin Montgomerie, Tom Kite and Ian Poulter as the 3 strongest Ryder Cup golfers of all time, standard errors indicating minimal difference in strengths of players at the top.  As a gauge of overall golfer strength, Baker & McHale assessed their results over the 4 major golfing competitions; US Masters, US Open, British Open and USPGA.  The authors found that overall strength of a Foursomes pair reflected that of the strongest player, a useful finding for team captains, pundits and fans alike.  The authors conclude “Further work might look for a large sample approximation to the methodology presented here so that numerical integration was not necessary. Of course, for those interested in sport, applying this type of model to obtain rankings elsewhere will be a potential source of debate and discussion. We hope the results presented here will achieve such a thing for golf fans.”

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About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

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Ben Hudson, Taylor & Francis Group

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, Philadelphia.

Achieving Equity in Higher Education: Developing student values in the new generation

In this retrospective account of their scholarly work over the past 45 years, Achieving Equity in Higher Education: The Unfinished Agenda, Alexander and Helen Astin show how the struggle to achieve greater equity in American higher education is intimately connected to issues of character development, leadership, civic responsibility, and spirituality.  The authors advocate that colleges and universities focus greater attention on developing student values and other personal qualities that will produce a new generation of citizens who are committed to creating a more just and equitable society.

“When Alexander and Helen Astin speak on higher education, people listen.  In previous studies in the Journal of Higher Education and the Chronicle of Higher Education,  Alexander Astin was noted as the most frequently cited author in the field of higher education. This article is especially relevant today not only because it is a critical review of past research on moral education viewed through the lens and the work of the authors, but because it is also a critique of the current status of higher education and an argument for the need to focus more intentionally on equity and fairness. The stakes are high because the fate of our nation depends upon whether we succeed in cultivating worthy moral and civic leaders.”
---Jon Dalton and Pam Crosby, editors, Journal of College and Character

The article, Achieving Equity in Higher Education: The Unfinished Agenda is published in the new issue of Journal of College and Character, a professional journal that examines how colleges and universities impact the moral and civic character development of students. The journal publishes scholarly articles and applied research on issues concerning ethics, values, character development, and spiritual growth in the higher education setting.

About NASPA–Student Affairs Administrators in Higher Education
NASPA is the leading association for the advancement, health, and sustainability of the student affairs profession.  We serve a full range of professionals who provide programs, experiences, and services that cultivate student learning and success in concert with the mission of our colleges and universities.  Established in 1918 and founded in 1919, NASPA is comprised of 13,000 members in all 50 states, 25 countries, and 8 U.S. Territories.  For more information about NASPA and full membership details, please visit: http://www.naspa.org/

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* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/2194587X.2015.1024799

, Philadelphia.

Assessment of Complex Thinking: a new special issue from Theory Into Practice

'Assessment of Complex Thinking' is the theme of Theory Into Practice, Summer 2015, Volume 54, Number 3, guest edited by Kadriye Ercikan, University of British Columbia.

This issue of Theory Into Practice focuses on the topic of assessment of complex thinking. The contributors discuss challenges and provide models of assessments of complex thinking in disciplinary areas as well as intersections of these disciplines. During the last two decades, there have been great developments in research on how students learn in different subject areas, and the progression of knowledge and competencies.¹  

This research has emphasized complex thinking as part of desirable learning outcomes in many areas in education. These include problem solving in mathematics,² higher order thinking in reading,³ inquiry and knowledge integration in science,⁴  and historical reasoning and thinking in history education.⁵  However, complex thinking is often neglected in assessments of student learning and there is limited research to guide designing and validating assessment of complex thinking.⁶  

The special issue gives an interdisciplinary perspective on connections between cognition and assessment, discusses challenges in developing assessments of complex thinking, provide models of such assessments for formative and summative assessments and discuss validation investigations.

¹(Bransford, Brown, & Cocking, 2000; Ercikan, 2006; Pellegrino, Glaser & Chudowsky, 2001)
²(Daro, Mosher, & Corcoran, 2011; Schoenfeld, 1985)
³(Afflerbach, 2012)
⁴(Linn & Eylon, 2011)
⁵(Seixas, 2009; Wineburg, 2001)
⁶(Ercikan, 2006; Ercikan & Seixas, 2011; Reich, 2009; Schraw & Robinson, 2011)

ACCESS A FREE ARTICLE FROM THE NEW ISSUE: Summative and Formative Assessments in Mathematics Supporting the Goals of the Common Core Standards by Alan H. Schoenfeld  

Theory Into Practice is the peer reviewed, scholarly journal owned by The Ohio State University’s College of Education and Human Ecology, and published by Taylor & Francis.  For further information on subscription and back issue orders for Theory Into Practice contact:

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* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00405841.2015.1044346

, Oxford.

Selfies: a depiction of female narcissism or a platform for political empowerment?

A cultural social media phenomenon of recent years, ‘selfie’ was declared the Oxford English Dictionary 2013 Word of the Year. Since then it has become a powerful means of self-expression, particularly for young women in their teens and early twenties. But do selfies merely represent shallow online narcissism? New research published in Consumption Markets & Culture explores "the political urgency at the heart of the selfie phenomenon".

Though he acknowledges that selfies are often perceived to be negative depictions of an ever-increasing consumerist society, Derek Conrad Murray suggests an alternative where selfies offer opportunities for political engagement and community building while also acting as a means with which to resist misrepresentation.  

In his article, Murray remarks on the contradiction of the selfie, contrasting the extent to which the term has been accepted and embedded into cultural consciousness with the social condemnation of the act itself as the "butt of the joke". 

Murray locates the phenomenon in the context of post-feminism, exploring how young feminists have moved away from Second and Third-Wave feminism in the search for a platform for political action. He concludes with the suggestion that the "selfie is an instinct of self-preservation: a survivorship reflex".

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About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.   From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information please contact:
Rebecca Bray
Taylor & Francis Journals
Email: rebecca.bray@tandf.co.uk

, Oxford.

How to engage the population with climate change? Frame it as a public health issue

How to engage the population with climate change? Frame it as a public health issue

Recent research in Environmental Communication examines the powerful influence of mass media portrayal of climate change and subsequent public identification with the issue.  Climate change is often reported as an environmental issue, this depiction arguably lacks personal relevance to individuals.  Weathers and Kendall study US reportage of climate change in a public health frame; a more powerful presentation for motivating public engagement and action against climate change? 

The majority of the US public are known to largely gain their understanding of climate change from the mass media. Previous climate change communications have largely been from a scientific and environmental perspective, leaving audiences disaffected.  Little coverage has raised public health consequences of climate change such as higher incidence of asthma, allergies, disease and heat stroke amongst many.  Would US citizens alter consumer decisions and seek solutions to climate change if they realised the implications for human health in their own communities as well as the Arctic?  The authors conduct a multi-year content analysis of 270 US climate change news reports in a public health context to assess quantity and style of reporting delivered to Americans. 

A 2007 Gallup poll of US citizens revealed 41% to be personally worried about climate change.  In 2010 this dropped to 28%.  Is this correlated to media coverage? Consumer demand for dramatized news has dictated less coverage on climate change over the study period, but did the style of presentation change? Climate change articles were classified into public health related issues; general health, heat, weather, respiratory problems, water/food borne disease and vermin borne disease. 

Despite a drop in coverage, those framed in a public health context sharply increased, especially in relation to heat and general health, evidence of  public health framing as an effective means to communicate climate change.  The authors urge increased coverage of climate change in a public health context to bridge the knowledge gap between the public health community and the general public to encourage mitigating steps.  Weathers and Kendall note “here is one starting point for examining, tracking, and critically assessing the story of climate change in public health terms—a project that deserves further attention from communication, environment, and public health scholars.”

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About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information, please contact:
Andy Hall
Taylor & Francis Journals
Email: Andy.Hall@tandf.co.uk

, New York.

Public Interest Design Practice Guidebook: SEED methodology, case studies, and critical issues

Public Interest Design Practice Guidebook: SEED methodology, case studies, and critical issues

This innovative new title is the first book to declare public interest design to be a distinct profession of interdisciplinary design practice.

The first professional standard for public interest design, the Public Interest Design Practice Guidebook provides clear professional standards of practice, following SEED (Social Economic Environmental Design) methodology.  With an ‘Issues Index’ focused on 75 critical social, economic, and environmental issues (each illustrated with a built project representing 15 countries and 5 continents) readers learn that every human issue is a design issue.

Contributions from Thomas Fisher, Heather Fleming and David Kaisel, Michael Cohen, Michael P. Murphy Jr. and Alan Ricks, and over twenty others cover topics such as professional responsibility, public interest design business development, design evaluation, and capacity building through scaling, along with many more.  In addition, this comprehensive manual contains a methods guide, locator atlas, and an annotated reading list. 

For anyone working in the fields of architecture, urban planning, industrial design, landscape architecture, or communication design, the Public Interest Design Practice Guidebook gives design professionals all the information they need to create community-centered environments, products, and systems.

'Bryan Bell and Lisa Abendroth have dedicated their respective careers to igniting the spirit of public interest design that exists within all of us who are charged with creating the constructed legacy of our time. If you have ever had the inclination to work on behalf of others whose needs are far greater than our own, then you will find the instruction, wisdom and inspiration contained within this book invaluable.' - R. Steven Lewis, SEED Network founding member, USA

About the Editors

Lisa M. Abendroth is a professor at Metropolitan State University of Denver in Colorado, USA. She is a SEED Network founding member, a SEED Evaluator coauthor, and a 2013 recipient of the SEED Award for Leadership in Public Interest Design.

Bryan Bell is the founder of Design Corps in North Carolina, USA, and cofounder of the SEED (Social Economic Environmental Design) Network. Bell was awarded a National AIA Award and was a National Design Award Finalist. His work has been exhibited at the Venice Biennale and the Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum.

Public Interest Design Practice Guidebook: SEED Methodology, Case Studies, and Critical Issues
Edited by Lisa M. Abendroth & Bryan Bell
Published June 22nd, 2015
http://www.routledge.com/books/details/9781138810358/

To request a review copy or an interview with the editors, please contact: Christopher Hardin, Senior Marketing Manager, at Christopher.Hardin@taylorandfrancis.com.

About Routledge/Taylor & Francis Group

Routledge is the world's leading academic publisher in the Humanities and Social Sciences. We publish thousands of books and journals each year, serving scholars, instructors, and professional communities worldwide. Our current publishing programme encompasses groundbreaking textbooks and premier, peer-reviewed research in the Social Sciences, Humanities, and Built Environment. We have partnered with many of the most influential societies and academic bodies to publish their journals and book series. Readers can access tens of thousands of print and e-books from our extensive catalogue of titles. Routledge is a member of Taylor & Francis Group, an informa business.

For more information, please contact:

Christopher Hardin
Senior Marketing Manager
711 Third Ave. | New York | NY 10017 | USA
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Email: christopher.hardin@taylorandfrancis.com