Taylor & Francis Newsroom

, Oxford.

New study shows benefits of internet-based therapy in overcoming childbirth fear

Women expecting their first child but who are experiencing severe fear of childbirth (FOC) stand to dramatically benefit in reducing their anxieties with cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) delivered via the internet, according to the results of new research.

FOC can have a devastating impact on a nulliparous woman's life, disrupting her work and home routines and even extending to social situations and relationships with people as she is overly consumed by a fear of delivering her first child. Some women suffering from the condition seek out Caesarean sections as an answer to their fears, and up to 25% of pregnant woman have FOC, according to a number of studies. In some cases, the fear is so overpowering it can be defined as an all-out phobia of delivering the baby.

For the new study, researchers took 28 Swedish-speaking women who were expecting their first baby and suffering from severe FOC. The women then actively took part in an internet-based CBT programme that lasted for eight weeks and included elements of psycho-education, breathing retraining, imaginary exposure and cognitive restructuring.

The participants were given homework that had to be submitted weekly and also gave a measurement of their level of fear about delivering their first child – using the Wijma Delivery Expectancy/Experience Questionnaire, at enrolment, during the therapy and after giving birth. A therapist then gave each woman feedback via a secure online system.

The outcome of the feasibility study, which appears in the Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics & Gynaecology, showed a statistically significant decrease in the anxieties of the nulliparous women following the online therapy. However, the authors caution that before CBT can be determined as the definitive solution to severe FOC, the results must first be confirmed in randomised controlled studies.

Katri Nieminen, co-author of an article on the study that was published in the journal, said the findings showed that women can gain significant relief from FOC by using CBT and that it could become an effective treatment in dealing with the problem and allowing women to give birth naturally without being consumed by what are mostly irrational fears.

“This study indicates new treatment possibilities for pregnant women suffering from severe fear of childbirth” she said.

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About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.   From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

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Elaine Roberts
Taylor & Francis Journals
Email: elaine.roberts@tandf.co.uk

, Oxford.

MPs more likely to secure top jobs in safe seats

On the eve of the English parliamentary elections, Elad Klein & Resul Umit’s paper in The Journal of Legislative Studies commands attention. The authors study UK House of Commons data from 1992-2015 to establish the relationship between local elections and government ministerial appointments. Do the electoral interests of MPs and party leaders influence the strategic process of government selection?

Traditionally, electing MPs and appointing government ministers have been two separate processes. There is little evidence to show whether electoral performance of an MP affects their likelihood of ministerial selection. Political science points to a ‘rational choice’ approach whereby prudent and logical decisions based on party loyalty or policy preference, are made for maximum agency within the party. But could a landslide win or history of repeated wins in local elections increase the chances of ministerial selection? Klein & Umit believe so; whilst MPs aim for re-election and future promotion to government, party leaders aim to boost MP numbers, stay in power and pursue their ideals. Hence, there is an ‘electoral connection’ between the power of the electorate to select MPs and decision making amongst government ranks in ministerial selection. The authors state, “The party leader needs to offer the offices to the right parliamentarians … to achieve the desired policy outcomes. At the same time, he needs to ensure that his decision does not cost his party votes, and thus seats, in the next election.” Could the party leaders be playing it safe with MPs and constituencies when appointing ministers?

Klein & Umit compiled statistics for newly appointed ministers in the last five electoral terms, considering post allocations, age, gender and most significantly electoral majority and seat safety. Overall, their findings suggest a strong correlation between electoral safety and ministerial appointment. MPs previously in office had a significantly higher chance of reselection and those with higher vote share were more likely. Women too had a higher chance of selection but junior MPs were less likely pending the cultivation of a following in the constituency. Conversely more senior MPs with large following need not rely on a safe constituency for ministerial selection but could count on reputation alone. Most significantly ministerial selection was linked to safe constituencies even when MPs lacked experience in office prior to government appointment. The authors conclude “these findings highlight the meaningful weight of the re-election ambition both for parties and parliamentarians, and show that safety comes first... When the prospect of re-election is in danger, vote ambition outweighs other ambitions… As a result, elections might be more than the dual mechanism of choosing a legislative representative and a party leader in parliamentary systems... electorates can affect the allocation of ministerial positions as well.”

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About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.   From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information please contact:
Mel Phillips, Marketing Executive
Taylor & Francis Journals
Email: melissa.phillips@tandf.co.uk

, Oxford.

Taylor & Francis Group launch TandFChina.com: its online hub for Chinese customers and partners

Taylor & Francis Group launch TandFChina.com: its online hub for Chinese customers and partners

Launching today, TandFChina.com is Taylor & Francis’ online hub for the scholarly community in China. It offers key resources for authors, researchers, journal editors, research librarians and learned societies in Mandarin, as well as being a gateway to all Taylor & Francis content, both books and journals and from all imprints (Routledge, Taylor & Francis, CRC Press and Garland Science).

More than 70,000 China-based researchers published in Taylor & Francis journals in 2015, almost five times the figure in 2010, and accounting for 16% of authors published that year. This number continues to grow, with over 25,000 published so far in 2016. Taylor & Francis already provides guidance for aspiring, new and experienced researchers but the launch of TandFChina.com brings this to Chinese authors in Mandarin, with key information on such areas as publishing a book, selecting and submitting to a journal, promoting research, and Open Access publishing. With links to English language editing services and videos and infographics in Mandarin, TandFchina.com will help visitors better understand and navigate the publishing process.

Dedicated sections for journal editors, research librarians and learned societies support each of these publishing partners, while links to Taylor & Francis Online, Taylor & Francis ebooks and CRC Netbase are quick to navigate to. Latest news from the Group will also offer regional updates and insights on the scholarly publishing landscape within China. Previewed at Taylor & Francis events in Hong Kong and Beijing, Xin Jin, Editor of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science Letters, commented,

“This Chinese website of Taylor & Francis Group will greatly enhance the interaction between publishers, editors and authors; enable Chinese editors to catch up with the latest news from Taylor & Francis Group and the overall publishing industry … Congratulations and thanks!”

Of the launch, Roger Horton (Chief Executive, Taylor & Francis Group) said,

“During my 20 years at Taylor & Francis I have been delighted to see us develop to become a truly global academic publisher. Recently I have taken a great pleasure and pride in helping Taylor & Francis establish a greater presence in Asia, and particularly in China. It is vital that we connect with all our academic partners in China, and this initiative is another important step on the journey we wish to take in China over the coming years.”

Eng Guan Ang, Managing Director, Taylor & Francis China said:

“I am excited for the future of Taylor & Francis in China. Whether you are a librarian, an author of book or journal article, editor or academic society, I believe your partnership with us will increase the awareness of global audiences of the increasingly important role Chinese scholarship is playing internationally. This website will make our partnership even more efficient and easier.”

Visit the Taylor & Francis China website at TandFChina.com.

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About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life. As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information please contact:
Lorna Berrett, Head of Communications, Taylor & Francis
Email: lorna.berrett@tandf.co.uk

, Philadelphia.

Zika Virus and Health Systems in Brazil: From Unknown to a Menace

Health Systems & Reform presents the article “Zika Virus and Health Systems in Brazil: From Unknown to a Menace,” a commentary by Professor Marcia C. Castro, Department of Global Health and Population, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, on the Zika Virus epidemic in Brazil and the Americas. On February 1, 2016, a World Health Organization (WHO) emergency committee declared clusters of birth defects suspected of being linked to an epidemic of Zika virus in the Americas as a Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC). 

An association between Zika infections during pregnancy and the birth of babies with microcephaly (a birth defect in which an infant’s brain does not develop properly resulting in a smaller than normal head) was first suggested by Brazilian physicians in August 2015, and in November microcephaly cases potentially associated with Zika started to be recorded; three months later WHO made its announcement. In Brazil, the country hit hardest by the epidemic so far, there have been 6,906 suspected cases of microcephaly as of April 2, 2016. The exact number of Zika infections in Brazil is not known, but autochthonous transmission of the virus has been confirmed in all 27 states in Brazil. In addition, as of April 7 autochthonous transmission of Zika virus has been confirmed in 34 countries/territories of the Americas.

According to the commentary, “the unfolding story of Zika virus in the Americas is much more than a mosquito-borne disease that may affect fetal development. It is the story of a disease that exposed problems and raised challenges that the affected health systems and governments cannot ignore.” Based largely on lessons provided by Brazil’s Zika epidemic, Castro discusses five critical problems and challenges and reflects on opportunities to remedy them.

The article concludes that “the challenges currently faced by the Brazilian health system from the Zika virus epidemic, as well as the solutions being implemented to overcome some of these challenges, highlight actions that other countries in Latin America and the Caribbean, with active transmission of Zika virus, should be considering. With a universal health care system, and a successful primary health care strategy, Brazil is in a better position than its neighboring countries to handle the chaotic situation that has emerged with the Zika virus epidemic. The struggle in Brazil shows that the fight against the Zika virus, and against other diseases transmitted by Ae. aegypti (dengue and chikungunya), cannot be won if the only fighter is the health sector, if the weapons are limited and/or inappropriate, and if the battle plan does not address the basic needs and rights of the population. Otherwise, besides losing this fight against Zika, it is just a matter of time until the next menace arrives.”

 

About Health Systems & Reform

Health Systems & Reform is the first peer-reviewed journal that is dedicated to bridging research, theory and analysis with knowledge and experience in health systems and reform, and aims at becoming a global platform for sharing positive and normative lessons in this field. Most health systems around the world are at various stages of reform cycles.  Aging, chronic diseases, persistent infectious diseases, and new healthcare technologies are among mounting challenges that require innovative and cost-effective approaches to healthcare delivery and reform. On the other hand, there is no international journal that is dedicated to catalyzing cross-national knowledge transfer and translation in health systems and reform. Health Systems & Reform will fill this gap. Health Systems & Reform receives all manuscript submissions electronically via their eJournal Press website located at: http://hsr.msubmit.net.

Editor-in-Chief: Joseph Antoun, University of Chicago
Editor-in-Chief: Michael R. Reich, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

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Caitlin Sheeder-Borrelli, Journals Marketing Assistant, Taylor & Francis
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, Philadelphia.

Assessment of Total Choline Intakes in the United States

Choline is an essential nutrient and plays a critical role in brain development, cell signaling, nerve impulse transmission, liver function, and maintenance of a healthy metabolism. The article “Assesment of Total Choline Intakes in the United States” by Taylor C. Wallace PhD, CFS, FACN & Victor L. Fulgoni III PhD, from the Journal of the American College of Nutrition, analyzes the usual intakes of choline and compares them with the dietary reference intakes for U.S. residents aged ≥2 years. Choline can be found naturally in foods including eggs, liver, beef, salmon, shrimp, cauliflower, spinach, Brussels sprouts, and breast milk. Symptoms of a choline deficiency may include low energy levels, memory loss, cognitive decline, muscle aches, nerve damage, and mood changes or disorders.

The National Cancer Institute method was used to assess usual intakes of choline from foods according to data for participants in the 2009–2012 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES; n = 16,809). The results showed that suboptimal intakes of choline are prevalent across many life-stage subpopulations in the United States. Only 10.8 ± 0.6% of 2009–2012 NHANES participants aged ≥2 years (15.6 ± 0.8% of males and 6.1 ± 0.6% of females) achieved the adequate intake (AI) for choline. Children aged 2–3 years were the most likely to exceed the AI (62.9 ± 3.1%), followed by children aged 4–8 years (45.4 ± 1.6%) and children aged 9–13 years (9.0 ± 1.0%), compared to adolescents aged 14–18 years (1.8 ± 0.4%) and adults aged ≥19 years (6.6 ± 0.5%). When comparing by age and gender, males consumed significantly more choline than females for all age groups.

These data indicate that there is a need to increase awareness among health professionals and consumers regarding potential suboptimal intakes of choline in the United States, as well as the critical role that choline plays in health maintenance throughout the lifespan. Food scientists and the food and dietary supplement industries should consider working collectively with government agencies to discuss strategies to help offset the percentage of the population that does not meet the adequate intake. Revision of the dietary reference intakes for choline should include replacement of the adequate intake with an estimated average requirement and a recommended dietary allowance, so that more accurate population estimates of inadequate intakes may be calculated.

About Journal of the American College of Nutrition
Frequency Increase in 2016 – Now published eight times per year, the Journal of the American College of Nutrition continues to provide original and innovative research in nutrition with useful application for researchers, physicians, and other health care professionals. Journal Citation Reports® ranks Journal of the American College of Nutrition in the category of Nutrition & Dietetics (Science) with an Impact Factor of 1.453 and a 2.867 5-Year Impact Factor (© 2015 Thomson Reuters, 2014 Journal Citation Reports®). Follow the American College of Nutrition on Twitter - @AmColNutrition

About the American College of Nutrition®
The American College of Nutrition® has been dedicated since 1959 to enhancing clinical nutrition. The College strives to stimulate nutrition research and publication, elevate nutrition knowledge among researchers and clinicians, and provide practical guidance on clinical nutrition. Society Contact: Michael Stroka, JD, MBA, MS, CNS, Executive Director, American College of Nutrition, email: mstroka@americancollegeofnutrition.org

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Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life. As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

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Caitlin Sheeder-Borrelli, Journals Marketing Assistant, Taylor & Francis
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, Oxford.

Can thinking about your pet help you cope with social rejection?

Do animals have a unique ability to comfort people, or are they just distractions from social pain?

A recent study reveals that people who are more likely to assign human-like qualities to animals or inanimate objects may benefit from just thinking about animals when feeling socially rejected.

In three separate studies, participants were asked to relive past experiences of social rejection. After this, they were then asked to name photographed animals and their feelings were analysed again. Participants who thought of names for animals reported less negative emotions and feelings of rejection than those who did not. Thinking about naming a human did not produce the same effect; with the study showcasing evidence that thoughts about a pet can provide a soothing stimulus for humans.

The lead author of the study, Christina M. Brown, said: “Those who are more predisposed to attribute entities with human like-characteristics would benefit from even the most minimal engagement with animals.”

Anthropomorphism may be an effective and powerful way to eradicate and combat the negative feelings that result from social rejection.

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Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life. As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, e-books and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.  From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

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Steven Turner, Marketing Coordinator
Journals Marketing
email: steven.turner@tandf.co.uk

, Oxford.

The name’s Jamesbondia: new group of Caribbean plants named after James Bond

An article published in Plant Biosystems formally proposes the existence of a new subgenus of plants, Jamesbondia, an infrageneric group of the Neotropical flowering genus known as Alternanthera. It has officially been called Jamesbondia after the notable American ornithologist James Bond, whose name Ian Fleming is known to have used for his eponymous spy series.

The four Jamesbondia plant species are mostly found in Central America and the Caribbean Islands. Authors I. Sánchez-del Pino and D. Iamonico have built on the research of J.M. Mears, who identified a group of Caribbean plant species as “Jamesbondia” from 1980 to 1982 in unpublished annotations on Alternanthera specimens. Molecular phylogenetic analyses and observations of the flower morphology justify the official separate naming of this group.

The name Jamesbondia has never previously been validly published. Respecting the annotations of Mears, the authors named the subgenus in honour of the American ornithologist. Sánchez-del Pino and Iamonico suspect that Mears’ choice of name relates to the geographic distribution of the species: “‘Jamesbondia is clearly dedicated to the ornithologist James Bond (1900–1989), who focused his research on birds in the same Caribbean areas that are the primary home of the four putative species of subgenus Jamesbondia.”

Ian Fleming, a keen bird watcher, adopted the name for his series of spy novels about a fictional British Secret Service and is quoted as saying, ''It struck me that this brief, unromantic, Anglo-Saxon and yet very masculine name was just what I needed, and so a second James Bond was born.”

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About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

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Deirdre Kilbride
Marketing Executive, Taylor and Francis Journals

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, Oxford.

A spoonful of sugar? Swapping sugary drinks for water and dairy seems the best medicine.

New research by Andersen et al, published in the International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition, may have an impact on the sugar tax debate.  The research team observed overall changes in dietary patterns in overweight children, including a decrease in consumption of sugary drinks, when additional water or milk is added to their diet.  

Since 2011 the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition has recommended plain water as the best source of fluid for children, to promote fullness, reduce calorie intake and subsequently stabilise weight. Until now though, little evidence has proven the link between children’s choice of beverage, dietary habits and weight. Using a sample of 173 overweight Danish adolescents, Andersen et al explored the effect of providing 1 l/d of either water or milk over a 12 week period on the overall diet. They studied effects on calories, nutrients, food types and general dietary patterns. The children were encouraged to eat without restraint during the study, except for the addition of the test drink. Would the addition of milk or water have a favourable effect on participants’ health?

The results showed participants recorded on average a lower intake of food per kilogram of body weight during the trial. Furthermore, consumption of convenience foods, notably sugary drinks, was significantly lower in both water and milk study groups. The water group showed a decrease in calories consumed during the intervention. This might be a positive step towards maintaining a healthy diet and maybe also a healthy weight. The authors note The main strength of this study is the…inclusion of the whole dietary approach of well measured foods and dietary patterns ... Moreover, the investigation was designed with no restriction of diet ... This imitates how dietary changes may be adapted into usual life and supports free-living behaviour, which increases the interpretation of results in relation to public health.”

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Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

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Caroline Blake, Taylor & Francis Group

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, Philadelphia.

Article exploring memories of sport in childhood wins SHAPE America Research Council’s 2015 Writing Award

SHAPE America's Research Council Writing Award Committee has announced that the article 'I just remember rugby': Re-membering Physical Education as More Than a Sport has been selected from the 86th volume of Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport (RQES) as the winner of the Research Council's 2015 Writing Award. This award is designed to identify outstanding contributions of scholarship from papers published in each volume of the RQES. The article's authors, Ashley Casey and Mikael Quennerstedt, were presented with the award during the Annual C.H. McCloy Research Lecture and Breakfast on April 7 during the SHAPE America National Convention & Expo in Minneapolis, MN.

The research study found that when boys recall memories of PE that move away from  playing or the multi-activity discourse and move toward an educative discourse where the “how” and “why” replace the “what,” then remembering becomes richer. This is something both research and practitioners of PE should pay attention to. If this reactualization of experience is “paid forward” (in other words, if students experience PE positively), then the impact could be significant for future generations. In seeking to shift the cultural norms, it is necessary to explore what people do and say in PE’s name—both those currently involved in the field and those who influence them. This starts with the positioning of PE within the individual and cultural memories of our societies.

Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport publishes research in the art and science of human movement that contributes significantly to the knowledge base of the field as new information, reviews, substantiation or contradiction of previous findings, development of theory, or as application of new or improved techniques. The goals of RQES are to provide a scholarly outlet for knowledge that: contributes to the study of human movement, particularly its cross-disciplinary and interdisciplinary nature; impacts theory and practice regarding human movement; stimulates research about human movement; and provides theoretical reviews and tutorials related to the study of human movement.

Routledge is proud to partner in publishing with SHAPE America, the largest organization of professionals involved in physical education, physical activity, dance and school-based health education. Explore the complete collection of SHAPE America titles and learn more about the organization at shapeamerica.tandfonline.com

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About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

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Emily Matthias - Senior Marketing Associate, Taylor & Francis Group.
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Tel: (215) 606-4238

, Philadelphia.

Bloodstream infection pathogens becoming more resilient

A recently published special issue of Virulence, "Bloodstream Infections", focuses on the resilience of bloodstream infections (BSI) and is endorsed by the European Study Group for Infections in Compromised Hosts of the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Guest Editor Dr. Claudio Viscoli, a Professor of Infectious Disease at the University of Genoa, outlines in an editorial "Bloodstream Infections: The Peak of the Iceberg" why a special issue was created focusing extensively on BSI.

Dr. Viscoli states, “BSI remain a formidable challenge for the infectious disease physician, but may become a mission impossible if we will not efficiently contrast the development of resistance.” He highlights how the pattern of types of BSI infecting pathogens has been changing and growing more resilient, while also more concerning is the decreasing efficacy of many antibiotics. The articles contained within the BSI special issue further inform and illuminate these concerns. The BSI special issue contains a wide spectrum of clinical settings, with articles addressing patient populations of those at high risk of infections and also those who occasionally interrelate with BSI. Microbiological problems, especially antibiotic resistance, were also examined within the special issue.

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Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.   From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

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