Taylor & Francis Newsroom

, Oxford.

The Foundation and Future of Instructional Communication

Communication Education, one of the National Communication Association’s 11 scholarly journals, is celebrating the association’s 100th anniversary with a special issue devoted to  the foundation and future of the study of communication in the classroom. The issue is dedicated to James C. McCroskey, whose seven-decade career and prolific writing made him one of the most well-known teachers in the Communication discipline.

“Teaching was a primary interest among early Communication scholars,” said Ann Bainbridge Frymier, Associate Dean of the Graduate School at Miami University and guest editor of the special issue. “The Communication discipline has grown to encompass many contexts, topics, methodologies, and paradigms, but it has always maintained its focus on teaching.”

The special issue includes retrospectives on research published since the journal’s launch in 1952, when it was known as The Speech Teacher, as well as forward-looking articles that present new areas for Communication scholars to explore. Articles include:

  • Virtual Invisibility: Race and Communication Education
  • When Disgruntled Students Go to Extremes: The Cyberbullying of Instructors
  • Securing the Future of Communication Education: Advancing an Advocacy and Research Agenda for the 21st Century
  • Perspectives on Instructional Communication's Historical Path to the Future
  • Inception: Beginning a New Conversation about Communication Pedagogy and Scholarship

“NCA’s members spend a significant portion of their professional lives in the classroom,” said Nancy Kidd, NCA Executive Director. “This special issue celebrates the centrality of teaching to the Communication discipline and is an excellent resource for young scholars and veteran teachers alike.”

Access this Special Issue and read selected featured articles for free until the end of December 2014.

http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/rced20/63/4

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.   From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.  For more information please contact:

Marita Eleftheriadou, Marketing Executive, Journals

email: Marita.Eleftheriadou@tandf.co.uk

, Oxford.

We’re embracing change say young researchers in latest analysis

As another successful Open Access Week passes, analysis released today reveals younger researchers are embracing change in scholarly communication. Just under 8,000 researchers from around the world responded to the 2014 Taylor & Francis Open Access Survey, giving their views on everything from the benefits of open access to licence preferences, peer review to the future of academic publishing. The overall results showed that whilst positivity was growing, uncertainty remained. But among the youngest respondents this uncertainty seems to be diminishing, as they embrace open access and the different options that are now available to them when they publish their research.    

Those in the 20-29 year old age group were most likely to agree that open access journals have a larger readership than subscription journals (58% either strongly agreed or agreed with this statement) and that open access journals are more heavily cited. Across all other age groups agreement with these statements decreased with age, with just 15% of those who were 70 or over expressing the same level of agreement on citations. Authors in their sixties and seventies offered the opposite opinion to those in their twenties, being the least likely to agree that open access publication increased readership and citations, and most likely to agree with the statement that there is ‘no fundamental benefit to open access’.  

Researchers were also asked to state their preference on different types of peer review, from rigorous peer review to post-publication review. Those in their twenties were least inclined to say ‘a rigorous assessment of the merit and novelty of their article’ is ‘always’ a suitable form of peer review for their research, and showed the most support for ‘accelerated peer review with fewer rounds of revision’, with 48% saying this would be always, or nearly always, acceptable for their work. Authors in their sixties showed the highest preference for rigorous peer review, although the number selecting ‘always’ (39%) was only 5% above the average for all age groups.

And what of their future intentions on publishing gold or green open access? Younger authors are consistently the highest proportion of any age group saying they would choose to publish their work open access, whether gold (37%) or green (51%). When it comes to being mandated to publish open access though, those in their twenties were the most unsure, with 61% unclear on whether they would be mandated to publish gold open access in the future.

But challenging current forms of scholarly communication only went so far for those who responded, with just one in ten believing that academic papers would no longer be the main output of research in ten years’ time. This remained static across all age groups. Of those who thought there might be a future alternative, the respondents suggested everything from interactive multimedia to blogging, greater use of repositories to more applied research, social media to the continued rise of open access. It seems the future is very much up for debate.    

The full analysis by age is now available on Taylor & Francis Online, including an infographic of the key findings.

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Note to editors

For the full survey: http://www.tandfonline.com/page/openaccess/opensurvey/2014

Response base was 7,936 in 2014 (9% response rate).

6% were in 20-29 age group

28%: 30 – 39 age group

27%: 40-49 age group

22%: 50-59 age group

13% 60-69 age group

3% were 70 or over

US and Canada were the largest group of respondents (38%). Authors based in Europe were the second largest group (32%).

For more information please contact:

Elaine Devine, Communications Manager (Author Relations),

Taylor & Francis Group

Tel: 07827 993760 / 020 7551 9181

elaine.devine@tandf.co.uk

, Philadelphia.

Lose the Weight, Not the Potatoes

A new study demonstrates that people can eat potatoes and still lose weight. Potatoes, Glycemic Index, and Weight Loss in Free-Living Individuals: Practical Implications is now available through free access from the Journal of the American College of Nutrition, the official publication of the American College of Nutrition and a publication from Routledge.

The study, a collaborative effort between the University of California at Davis and the Illinois Institute of Technology, sought to gain a better understanding of the role of calorie reduction and the glycemic index in weight loss when potatoes are included in the diet.  “Some people have questioned the role of potatoes in a weight loss regimen because of the vegetable’s designation as a high glycemic index food,” explained Dr. Britt Burton-Freeman, PhD, the lead investigator of the study. “However, the results of this study confirm what health professionals and nutrition experts have said for years: it is not about eliminating a certain food or food groups, rather, it is reducing calories that count,” said Burton-Freeman.

Ninety overweight men and women were randomly assigned to one of three groups: (1) reduced calorie/high GI, (2) reduced calorie/low GI, (3) control group with no calorie or GI restrictions. All three groups were provided potatoes, healthful recipes, and instructions to consume 5-7 servings of potatoes per week. At the end of the 12-week study period, the researchers found that all three groups had lost weight and there was no significant difference in weight loss between the groups.  

“There is no evidence that potatoes, when prepared in a healthful manner, contribute to weight gain. In fact, we are seeing that they can be part of a weight loss program,” said Burton-Freeman. 

Interestingly, even the control group reduced their caloric intake and lost weight despite not being provided with a specific calorie restriction. “The fact that all groups, even the control group, lost weight is a curious finding and provides cause for future research,” said co-investigator Dr. Tissa Kappagoda, MD, PhD. The study results are good news for potato lovers and any consumer who craves the satisfaction of wholesome yet healthy meal options.  One medium-size (5.3 ounce) skin-on potato contains just 110 calories per serving, boasts more potassium (620g) than a banana, provides almost half the daily value of vitamin C (45 percent), and contains no fat, sodium or cholesterol. This study was funded by the United States Potato Board (www.PotatoGoodness.com).

About Journal of the American College of Nutrition - www.tandfonline.com/r/jacn
Published six times per year, the Journal of the American College of Nutrition continues to provide original and  innovative research in nutrition with useful application for researchers, physicians, and other health care professionals. 2013 Journal Citations Report® ranks  Journal of the American College of Nutrition  55th out of 78 journals in Nutrition & Dietetics with a  2013 Impact Factor of  1.676 and a 5-Year Impact Factor of 3.176 (© 2014 Thomson Reuters, 2013 Journal Citation Reports®).  Follow the American College of Nutrition on Twitter - @AmColNutrition

About the American College of Nutrition® - www.americancollegeofnutrition.org
The American College of Nutrition® has been dedicated since 1959 to enhancing clinical nutrition. The College strives to stimulate nutrition research and publication, elevate nutrition knowledge among researchers and clinicians, and provide practical guidance on clinical nutrition. Society Contact: Michael Stroka, JD, MBA, MS, CNS, Executive Director, American College of Nutrition, Tel: 727-446-6086 or Email: mstroka@americancollegeofnutrition.org

About the United States Potato Board - www.PotatoGoodness.com
The United States Potato Board (USPB) is the nation’s potato marketing and research organization.  Based in Denver, Colorado, the USPB represents more than 2,500 potato growers and handlers across the country. The USPB was established in 1971 by a group of potato growers to promote the benefits of eating potatoes. Today, as the largest vegetable commodity board, the USPB is proud to be recognized as an innovator in the produce industry and dedicated to positioning potatoes as a nutrition powerhouse—truly, goodness unearthed.

NOTE TO JOURNALISTS
When referencing the article: Please include Journal title, author, published by Taylor & Francis and the following statement:

* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/07315724.2013.875441

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information please contact:
Michael Hobson, Marketing Assistant, Journals
Email: michael.hobson@taylorandfrancis.com

, Oxford.

Taylor & Francis and the IMarEST launch new publishing partnership

Taylor & Francis Group and the IMarEST (Institute of Marine Engineering, Science & Technology) are pleased to announce a new publishing partnership for 2015. Beginning in January, Taylor & Francis will publish and distribute the IMarEST’s highly regarded journals: Journal of Marine Engineering & Technology (JMET) and Journal of Operational Oceanography (JOO).

Published three times a year, Journal of Marine Engineering & Technology contains peer reviewed papers covering research, theory, and scientific studies concerned with all aspects of marine engineering and technology. Journal of Operational Oceanography is published biannually and publishes papers from the commercial sector and the academic sector in this rapidly expanding field of research. Both publications are listed in the Thomson Reuters Journal Citation Reports (JCR).

David Loosley, Chief Executive of the IMarEST, said: “We are delighted to work with Taylor & Francis to further enhance the Institute’s technical journals that have provided our membership with such rich technical information for many years. Our journals carry the latest research in Marine Engineering and Operational Oceanography, and this partnership will ensure that these are distributed to a much wider audience for the benefit of the maritime community.”

Dr David Green, Global Journals Publishing Director at Taylor & Francis, added: “We are delighted to enter a new publishing partnership with the IMarEST from 2015. We are excited to see two highly prestigious journals join us and look forward to working closely with the IMarEST in publishing world class research, serving members, authors and subscribers. We look forward to bringing the tangible benefits of improved access and reach, rapid production, high quality services to authors, and an industry-leading publishing platform to this important collaboration.”

About the IMarEST

The IMarEST is an international membership body and learned society for all marine professionals. It is the first Institute to bring together marine engineers, marine scientists and marine technologists into one international multi-disciplinary professional body. It is the largest marine organisation of its kind with a worldwide membership of around 15,000 based in over 100 countries.

Working with the global marine community, the IMarEST promotes the scientific development of marine engineering, science and technology, providing opportunities for the exchange of ideas and practices and upholding the status, standards and expertise of marine professionals worldwide.

The IMarEST is a respected authority in every maritime country. It is a Non-Governmental Organisation with consultative status at the International Maritime Organization (IMO), observer status at the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission and International Hydrographic Organization (IHO), and it has special consultative status with the Economic and Social Council of the United Nations (ECOSOC), which facilitates its access to other international  intergovernmental meetings where its specialized marine expertise is of particular use, e.g., the United Nations meetings on Areas Beyond National Jurisdiction, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and the work of the International Seabed Authority on marine mining. It is a nominated and licensed body of the Engineering Council (UK), a member of the Science Council and has significant links with many other maritime organisations worldwide.

The IMarEST runs a series of industry leading and technically excellent events and conferences as well as publishing the internationally recognised publication, The Marine Professional.
 

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.  From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

Luke Antieul – Marketing Executive, Engineering Journals, Taylor & Francis Group.
Email: luke.antieul@tandf.co.uk
Tel: +44 (0)20 7551 9777

, Oxford.

The First Amendment: should a Facebook “like” constitute free speech to be protected?

A billion Facebook users generate 2.7 billion “likes” per day equating to 1,875,000 every minute.  Increasingly social media has become a form of social and political engagement and 47% of FB users have “liked” comments on a political cause they believe in.  Protected free speech is a luxury the Western world has long enjoyed.  Does clicking the universally understood thumbs-up “like” constitute actual speech?  It conveys a message understood by most but should it demand constitutional protection?  This article in First Amendment Studies explores legal precedents surrounding this form of communication and surveys FB users’ attitudes.

In the case of Bland V. Roberts, an employee was fired for “liking” a campaign lobbying against his boss.  The employee claimed the right to free speech but the judge ruled that in the absence of “sufficient” speech the case could not proceed to trial.  The employee was not reinstated.  In today’s context of morphing methods of communication, is the law not keeping up?  An ensuing debate revealed that large numbers concur and felt this judgement would lead to fear and inhibition and deter free expression of ideas and opinions online; the chill factor.  Ironically the First Amendment protects symbolic language, even rude gestures such as “the finger”. If it can stretch this far then surely it is not unfeasible to expect coverage for the FB thumbs up. The authors developed a study of Facebook users and devised a First Amendment Scale to examine the value of computer source code communication and its relation to free speech.

440 participants took part.  More than half had “liked” political content in the past.  4 hypotheses were tested and all proved true; that “like” users most certain of who would see their “like” expected recipients to understand their meaning, those who felt they had sent a message with a “like” are sure that recipients understood.  Participants believed when using “like” on political content that their posts were constitutionally protected.  Finally those using “like” to convey a message believed that this should be protected by the First Amendment.  The most common interpretation for “like” amongst participants was “agree”, “support” and generally to endorse a person, place or idea.  Overall participants believed that a “like” is akin to speech as detailed in the First Amendment.

The twist in the tale is that on appeal the Bland V Roberts judgement was reversed, ruling that the thumbs up indeed qualified for protection. As the authors note, “In both offline and online domains, each community of social practice negotiates its own language conventions and creates its own democracy of meaning. The parsing of the First Amendment will continue to be influenced by these communities.” They finish by urging further research on the “chill factor” and its potential negative effect on freedom of speech online.

NOTE TO JOURNALISTS
When referencing the article: Please include Journal title, author, published by Taylor & Francis and the following statement:

* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/21689725.2014.962557

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.   From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.  For more information please contact:

Marita Eleftheriadou, Marketing Executive, Journals

email: Marita.Eleftheriadou@tandf.co.uk

, Oxford.

Just how ‘open’ are you? Examining authors’ attitudes to licences, reuse and distribution

Just how ‘open’ are you? Examining authors’ attitudes to licences, reuse and distribution

Understanding how others can use your work and making decisions on the licence you want to apply to your published research is crucial for any author. The open access movement strongly advocates liberal reuse and distribution of content and there has also been a move by UK funders to mandate use of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) licence when public funds are used to pay for open access publishing. But how does this fit with individual researchers’ attitudes and opinions on licences? Do their preferences vary by gender, age, career stage or discipline? And are the voices advocating liberal reuse and distribution changing the opinions of today’s research community? 

The 2014 Taylor & Francis Open Access Survey sought to answer some of these questions, surveying authors on their licence preferences as part of wider research on open access. Analysis released today further breaks down these initial findings by region, country, discipline, gender, age, and career stage.

Initial results showed that the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND) remained the most preferred licence, with the traditional choices of Exclusive Licence to Publish and Copyright Assignment following behind, at the cost of the remaining Creative Commons Licences. This year’s results did however show a softening of attitudes towards CC BY when compared to the 2013 Taylor & Francis Open Access Survey. Although still the least popular licence, CC BY (the least restrictive Creative Commons licence, permitting “unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited”) only attracted around a third (35%) of least preferred licence selections in 2014, as opposed to over half (52%) in 2013.

When analysed by career stage, this overall preference for more restrictive or traditional licences remains the same, whether it was those with fewer than 5 years’ experience responding or more than 20 years.  Would this differ by age though, with younger researchers more accepting of liberal reuse and distribution? Surprisingly, authors who responded to this survey picked similar choices, with those from their 20s to their 50s following the overall preference for CC BY-NC-ND. For those in their 60s and 70s Exclusive Licence to Publish overtook CC BY-NC-ND as the most popular choice, and for those in their 70s a sharp drop in the popularity of CC BY-NC-ND is matched by a rise in the support for CC BY-NC (Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial).  

These preferences reflect authors’ overall views when asking about commercial versus non-commercial reuse, with 65% saying it was unacceptable for their work to be used for commercial gain (down slightly from 67% in 2013). When asked about their attitude to their work being used for non-commercial gain though, 71% believed this was acceptable, an increase of 3% from 2013.   

Such responses create an interesting quandary for the open access movement, with even authors from the science, technical and medical fields showing an increase in their preference for the more restrictive and traditional licences. In this survey, only computer scientists showed any significant support for the less restrictive Creative Commons options. According to these responses, reuse and distribution continues to be a challenging subject across the research community, with much work to be done before individuals are comfortable with the most liberal options.  

The full analysis on licence preferences is now available on Taylor & Francis Online, with the complete dataset on Figshare.

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Notes to editors

Full analysis on licence preferences: http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/explore/Open-Access-Survey-2014-Supp-1.pdf

Full survey results: http://www.tandfonline.com/page/openaccess/opensurvey/2014

Methodology:

As part of the overall Taylor & Francis 2014 Open Access Survey, authors were given a choice of six licence options; four Creative Commons choices (CC BY, CC BY-ND, CC BY-NC and CC BY-NC-ND) and two traditional choices (Exclusive Licence to Publish and Copyright Assignment ). They were asked to rate their most preferred, second most preferred and least preferred choice, with an industry standard definition for each option plus links to the Creative Commons suite on the Creative Commons website.

Creative Commons licence definitions: https://creativecommons.org/licenses

Response base was 7,936 in 2014 (9% response rate). In 2013 this was 14,768 in 2013 (19%). US and Canada were the largest group of respondents (38% - an increase of 6% on 2013). Authors based in Europe were the second largest group (32%, down 2% on 2013).

Join in the conversation on Twitter @TandFOpen #oasurvey2014. 

For more information, please contact:

Elaine Devine
Communications Manager- Author Relations
Elaine.Devine@tandf.co.uk
Tel: 020 755 19181 / 07827 993 760
 

, Oxford.

Recognising emotion in text :-S the business benefits :-)

Researchers have advanced the field of affective computing (AC) – the creation of computer systems that recognize, express and process human emotions – by proposing a new way to recognize emotion in text. Their development has significant potential for business applications.

In a world full of blog posts, tweets and emails, the implications for businesses able to identify emotions contained in written communications are clear: a greater understanding of their customers’ behaviours, motivations, and satisfaction. By making use of AC in their ‘enterprise systems’, businesses that pay attention to ‘affective’ factors and build relationships with their customers may also obtain a competitive advantage. The current trend of ‘emotional marketing’ already acknowledges the important role emotions play in our decision-making processes. The research may also have implications for the analysis of human factors in other business functions and processes, such as supply chains.

Writing in the journal Enterprise Information Systems, Changqin Quan and Fuji Ren describe their approach – ‘multi-label textual emotion recognition’. It differs from other approaches to emotion recognition by taking into account the full emotional context of a sentence, rather than being purely ‘lexical’. Uniquely, Quan and Ren’s method allows its users to recognize indirect emotions, emotional ambiguity, or multiple emotions in the subject text.

As they explain: ‘Our model generates an emotion vector for each emotional word in a sentence by analysing semantic, syntactic, and contextual features. The emotion vector records basic emotions contained in the word.’ Each word is given an ‘emotional state’ represented by eight binary digits, each corresponding to one, or more, of eight key emotions: expectation, joy, love, surprise, anxiety, sorrow, anger, and hate. The final ‘result’ is based on ‘the state of combined expressions of emotions’ in the sentence as a whole.

This article is a fascinating insight into an expanding area of research. It also lays a path for future research into the subject, including how speech and facial emotion analysis might also be thrown into the analytical mix. Marketing and customer service may never be the same again.

NOTE TO JOURNALISTS
When referencing the article: Please include Journal title, author, published by Taylor & Francis and the following statement:

* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17517575.2014.948935

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information, please contact:

Ben Hudson, Taylor & Francis Group

Email: Benjamin.Hudson@tandf.co.uk

, Oxford.

United Versus City: who established Manchester’s footballing identity?

Manchester has one of the biggest rivalries in English Premiership Football and research by Gary James and Dave Day published in Soccer & Society has established who was responsible for giving Manchester the title as one of the biggest footballing cities in the world. In their article, “FA Cup Success, Football Infrastructure and the Establishment of Manchester’s Footballing Identity”, the authors discovered how the city’s first FA Cup success generated interest in the sport that then established Manchester as a true footballing city. “Football in Manchester was not embedded in the city’s life prior to the 1904 FA Cup success. It was mostly the dedicated followers of the city’s teams who paid notice to the game. But that all changed when Manchester City beat Bolton in the 1904 FA Cup final and the game established itself as part of the Mancunian way of life.”

The research identifies that this public interest was converted into football involvement in the weeks, months, and years that followed. Manchester’s clubs had a broad range of admission prices, meaning there was an appropriate offering for every class of fan, and that the clubs improved their venues to accommodate the new found interest. The number of football leagues and teams in the city grew at a rapid rate in the immediate aftermath of the 1904 FA Cup success, while pitch provision also improved. “When I set out I didn’t anticipate identifying how affordable the game was to Mancunians at this point but the further I explored the more I realised that Manchester’s football could only develop if the circumstances were right.….Football was open and available to all and that 1904 success led to the city being recognised for its strength of support and passion for the game. Over time both Manchester’s clubs were able to build on this and lay the foundations for Manchester’s position in the football world today.”

The research concludes that it is the current champions Manchester City who score the winner for launching Manchester’s success as one of the leading footballing cities in the world.

Gary James and Dave Day are members of the Sports & Leisure History Group at Manchester Metropolitan University.

NOTE TO JOURNALISTS
When referencing the article: Please include Journal title, author, published by Taylor & Francis and the following statement:

* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/14660970.2014.961378

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information please contact:
Leah Stanley, Marketing Executive
email: leah.stanley@tandf.co.uk

, Philadelphia.

Special Issue on Bullying and Cyberbullying from the Autumn 2014 Issue of Theory Into Practice, Vol 53, No. 4

Guest Edited by Sheri Bauman, University of Arizona, and Jina Yoon, Wayne State University

Bullying and victimization in schools have been linked to decreased academic performance*, increased absenteeism**, and negative psychosocial adjustment.***

Cyberbullying has emerged as an additional weapon in the arsenal of those who seek to harm others.  Because of unique characteristics of this new form of bullying, including perceived anonymity, online disinhibition effects encouraging increased cruelty, absence of time/space limitations, enormous size of potential audience, absence of nonverbal clues to message intent, and the permanence of content, experts believe that the consequences from victimization by cyberbullying may be even more severe than those of conventional victimization.

To access the Special Issue, visit: www.tandfonline.com/HTIP

The concern about bullying in schools, perhaps inflamed by the popular media, has encouraged many authors and groups to produce curricula and develop programs, often without consideration of the theoretical support the approach may have.  We believe that educators should consider both the empirical evidence and the theoretical basis on which the program was built.  We hope the articles in this issue help readers solidify the elements they look for in any programs they consider, and that doing so will result in the development of innovative programs that will result in significant reductions in bullying and victimization in our schools.

Theory Into Practice is the peer reviewed, scholarly journal owned by The Ohio State University’s College of Education and Human Ecology, and published by Taylor & Francis.

*Glew, Fan, Katon, Rivara, & Kernic, 2005; Holt, Finkelhor, & Kantor, 2007; Schwartz, Gorman, Nakamoto, & Tobin, 2005

** Dake, Price, & Telljohann, 2003; Forero, McLellan, Rissel, & Bauman, 1999; Kearney, 2008; Kochenderfer & Ladd, 1996

***Card, Stucky, Sawalani, & Little, 2008; Crick & Bigbee, 1998; Haynie et al., 2001; Smith, 2004

NOTE TO JOURNALISTS
When referencing the article: Please include Journal title, author, published by Taylor & Francis and the following statement:

* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/HTIP

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.

From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.

For more information, please contact:

Emily Matthias - Senior Marketing Associate, Taylor & Francis Group.
Email: emily.matthias@taylorandfrancis.com
Tel: (215) 606-4238

, Oxford.

Using feminist theory to understand male rape

Decades of feminist research have framed rape and sexual assault as a ‘women’s issue’, leaving little room for the experiences of male victims. But a new study published in the Journal of Gender Studies suggests that feminist theory, with its focus on the gendered nature of rape, can also help us understand the stigmas, social constructions, and realities associated with male rape.

Aliraza Javaid of the University of York writes: ‘Feminism conceptualises rape as a violent act which, along with a consideration of hegemonic masculinity, may help us understand why male rape has been widely overlooked and discover whether social and gender expectations facilitate this neglect.’

He adds: ‘How a man perceives himself as a man and in what ways masculinities are formed within a social and cultural setting are vital to understanding male rape.’

To illustrate these points, Javaid refers to the work of key feminist scholars throughout his article, highlighting how some of the central notions – power, control, hegemonic masculinity and patriarchy – can produce difficulties for understanding male rape. Crucially, a focus on men as aggressors has meant less time spent focusing on men as victims and the consequent neglect of male victims as a subject for empirical study. The emphasis on rape as a women’s concern has also created practical problems for male victims, such as a shortage of male police officers trained to help them and fewer means of support.

Javaid discusses in detail how cultural ‘expectations’ of men and masculinity pose challenges for dealing with male rape. The widespread belief that men cannot be raped – either by women or other men – as well as the expectation that men do not show emotion, may contribute to the fact that men report rape at much lower rates than women. Falling victim to a crime that generally affects women challenges notions of ‘hegemonic masculinity’ and male power: male rape victims are 'judged, and judge themselves’ to be ‘failed men’ for not fighting off perpetrators.

Javaid concludes that the widespread neglect of male sexual assault by scholars ‘functions to maintain and reinforce patriarchal power relations and hegemonic masculinities’. But even worse than that, such neglect of the male experience of rape undermines the cause of gender equality for which so many strive.

This article is essential reading for Gender Studies scholars as well as those involved in supporting victims of rape – of either sex.

NOTE TO JOURNALISTS
When referencing the article: Please include Journal title, author, published by Taylor & Francis and the following statement:

* Read the full article online:http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09589236.2014.959479

About Taylor & Francis Group

Taylor & Francis Group partners with researchers, scholarly societies, universities and libraries worldwide to bring knowledge to life.  As one of the world’s leading publishers of scholarly journals, books, ebooks and reference works our content spans all areas of Humanities, Social Sciences, Behavioural Sciences, Science, and Technology and Medicine.   From our network of offices in Oxford, New York, Philadelphia, Boca Raton, Boston, Melbourne, Singapore, Beijing, Tokyo, Stockholm, New Delhi and Johannesburg, Taylor & Francis staff provide local expertise and support to our editors, societies and authors and tailored, efficient customer service to our library colleagues.  For more information please contact:

Harriet Canavan, Marketing Executive, Journals
email: harriet.payne@tandf.co.uk